FCE 2021 Test 1 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

2/24/2021 1:50:00 PM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

PAPER

'Just imagine a day without paper,' reads one advertisement for a Finnish paper company. It adds, 'You almost see our products every day.' And they're right. But in most industrial countries, people are so to paper - whether it's for holding their groceries, for drying their hands or for them with the daily news - that its role in their daily lives passes largely unnoticed.

At one paper was in short supply and was used mainly for important documents, but more recently, growing economies and new technologies have a dramatic increase in the amount of paper used. Today, there are more than 450 different grades of paper, all designed for a different purpose.

Decades ago, some people predicted a 'paperless office'. , the widespread use of new technologies has gone hand-in-hand with an increased use of paper. Research into the relationship between paper use and the use of computers has shown that the general trend is likely to be one of the growth and interdependence.

However, the costs in paper production, in terms of the world's land, water and air resources, are high. This some important questions. How much paper do we really need and how much is wasted?

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

Hollywood

How was it that Hollywood came to be the place everyone associates with the American film industry?

In 1887, Harvey Wilcox, a property developer, bought a house and all the surrounding land on a hillside in southern California. His wife overheard a woman talking on a train about her summer house, she called 'Hollywood'. Mrs Wilcox like the name much that she decided to give her new home the same name. Mr Wilcox then built other houses on his land and used the name for the whole community. 

In normal circumstances, most people never have heard of Hollywood. But between 1908 and 1913 something else happened. Many small independent film companies began moving to southern California two main reasons. Firstly, they were having problems with the larger, more powerful studios in New York. Secondly, they were attracted by the sunny climate, which let them film throughout the year the need for expensive lighting.

Only one studio actually set in Hollywood itself, because the local people took legal measures to prevent any more from arriving. The other studios that came to the area were all built outside Hollywood. Nevertheless, by 1915 'Hollywood' become familiar as a term for the movie business a whole.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

A job with risks

Have you ever got really caught up in the excitement and emotion of a good film, and wondered in amazement how film stars manage to perform (DANGER) acts like jumping off building or driving at great speed? Of course, it is only a momentary feeling as it is no secret that the real (PERFORM) are almost invariably stuntmen or women, who can earn a very good (LIVE) by standing in for the stars when necessary. The work is (INCREDIBLE) demanding, and before qualifying for this job they have to undergo a rigorous training program and (PROOF) their ability in a number of sports including skiing, riding and gymnastics.

Naturally, the (SAFE) of the stunt performer is of the utmost importance. Much depends on the performer getting the timing exactly right so everything is planned down to the (TINY) detail. In a scene which involves a complicated series of actions, there is no time for careless mistake. A stunt man or woman often has only one chance of getting things right, (LIKE) film stars, who can, if necessary, film a scene repeatedly until it gains the director’s approval.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

It was wrong of you to borrow my jacket without asking. (ought)

=> You before you borrowed my jacket.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

"It was Pierre who left the door unlocked!" said Mary. (accused)

=> Mary the door unlocked.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Scientists say the climate didn't use to be so warm. (than)

=> Scientists say the climate is be.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

There were very few people at the concert last night. (came)

=> Hardly the concert last night.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

I've already planned my next holiday. (arrangements)

=> I've already my next holiday.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

We appear to have been given the wrong address. (as)

=> It we have been given the wrong address.

Read the following passage then choose the best answer to each question below.

Miss Rita Cohen, a tiny, pale-skinned girl who looked half the age of Seymour's daughter, Marie, but claimed to be some six years older, came to his factory one day. She was dressed in overalls and ugly big shoes, and a bush of wiry hair framed her pretty face. She was so tiny, so young that he could barely believe that she was at the University of Pennsylvania, doing research into the leather industry in New Jersey for her Master’s degree.

Three or four tunes a year someone either phoned Seymour or wrote to him to ask permission to see his factory, and occasionally he would assist a student by answering questions over the phone or, if the student struck him as especially serious, by offering a brief tour.

Rata Cohen was nearly as small, he thought, as the children from Mane's third-year class, who'd been brought the 50 kilometers from their rural schoolhouse one day, all those years ago, so that Marie's daddy could show them how he made gloves show then especially Marie's favorite spot, the laying-off table, where, at the end of the process, the men shaped and pressed each and every glove by pulling it carefully down over steam-heated brass hands. "The hands were dangerously hot and they were shiny and they stuck straight up from the cable in a row, thin-looking, like hands that had been flattened. As a little girl, Marie was captivated by their strangeness and called them the "pancake hands".

He heard Rita asking, "How many pieces come in a shipment?" "How many? Between twenty and twenty-five thousand." She continued taking notes as she asked, "They come directly to your shipping department?"

He liked finding that she was interested in every last detail. "They come to the tannery. The tannery is a contractor. We buy the material and they make it into the right kind of leather for us to use. My grandfather and father worked in the tannery right here in town. So did I, for six months, when I started in the business. Ever been inside a tannery?" "Not yet." "Well, you've got to go to a tannery if you're going to write about leather. I'll set that up for you if you'd like that. They're primitive places. The technology has improved things, but what you'll see isn't that different from what you'd have seen hundreds of years ago. Awful work. It's said to be the oldest industry of which remains have been found anywhere. Six-thousand-year-old relics of tanning found somewhere - Turkey, I believe. The first clothing was just skins that were tanned by smoking them. I told you it was an interesting subject once you get into it. My father is the leather scholar; he's the one you should be talking to. Start my father off about gloves and he'll talk for two days. That's typical, by the way: glovemen love the trade and everything about it. Tell me, have you ever seen anything being manufactured, Miss Cohen?" "I can't say I have." "Never seen anything made?" "Saw my mother make a cake when I was a child."

He laughed. She had made him laugh. An innocent with spirit, eager to learn. His daughter was easily 30cm taller than Rita Cohen, fair where she was dark, but otherwise, Rita Cohen had begun to remind him of Marie. The good-natured intelligence that would just waft out of her and into the house when she came home from school, full of what she'd learned in class. How she remembered everything. Everything neatly taken down in her notebook and memorized overnight.

"I'll tell you what we're going to do. We're going to bring you right through the whole process. Come on. We're going to make you a pair of gloves and you're going to watch them being made from start to finish. What size do you wear?"

(Adapted from FCE)

What was Seymour's first impression of Rita Cohen?
  • She reminded him of his daughter.
  • She was rather unattractive.
  • She did not look like a research student.
  • She hadn't given much thought to her appearance.

Seymour would show students round his factory if _____.

  • he thought they were genuinely interested.
  • they telephoned for permission.
  • they wrote him an interesting letter.
  • their questions were hard to answer by phone.
What did Seymour's daughter like most about visiting the factory?
  • watching her father make gloves
  • helping to shape the gloves
  • making gloves for her schoolfriends
  • seeing the brass hands

Seymour says that most tanneries today _____.

  • have been running tor over a hundred years.
  • are located in very old buildings.
  • are dependent on older workers.
  • still use traditional methods.
What does Seymour admire about his father?
  • his educational background
  • his knowledge of history
  • his enthusiasm for the business
  • his skill as a glovemaker

When she was a schoolgirl, Maria _____.

  • made her parents laugh
  • was intelligent but lazy
  • easily forgot what she had learned
  • was hard-working and enthusiastic

You are going to read a magazine article about swimming with dolphins. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. This was a magical experience and, as time in the water is limited, everyone rotates to get an equal share. We spent the next two hours getting in and out of the boat and visiting other pods.

B. An excited shriek led us all to try something that one girl had just discovered, and we all rushed to hang our feet over the front so that the playful creatures would touch them. 

C. A spotter plane circled above the bay, looking for large pods of dolphins to direct us towards. On deck, we watched for splashes on the surface of the water.

D. These include mothers gently guiding their young alongside, either to introduce them to the boat or to proudly show off their babies. Yet, when they become bored with playing, they leave. 

E. After 20 minutes, we sighted our first small pod. The dolphins came rushing towards the boat, swimming alongside and overtaking us until they could surf on the boat's bow waves.

F. However, touching the creatures is strongly discouraged. This is despite the fact that dolphins have a very friendly reputation, and have never been known to be aggressive towards human beings in the wild. 

G. Eventually it was time to leave, and the boat headed back to port. As we slowly motored along, we picked up another pod, which was joined by more and more dolphins until we had a huge escort.

Dolphins in the Bay of Plenty

Swimming with groups of dolphins, known as "pods", is becoming a popular holiday activity for the adventurous tourist. Our travel correspondent reports.

"You must remember that these dolphins are wild. They are not fed or trained in any way. These trips are purely on the dolphins' terms." So said one of our guides, as she briefed us before we set out for our rendezvous.

I was in Whakatane, in the Bay of Plenty in New Zealand, which is Cast becoming the place to visit for those who want a close encounter with dolphins. No skill is required to swim with dolphins, just common sense, and an awareness that we are visitors in their world. Once onboard the boat, our guides talked to us about what we could expect from our trip. 

The common dolphin we were seeking has a blue-black upper body, a grey lower body, and a long snout. We had been told that if they were in a feeding mood we would get a short encounter with them, but if they were being playful then it could last as long as two hours.

Soon we were in the middle of a much larger pod, with dolphins all around us. The first group of six swimmers put on their snorkels, slipped off the back of the boat and swam off towards them. 

After five minutes, that group was signalled back to the boat. I got ready to slide into the water with the next six swimmers, leaving the excited chatter of the first group behind. Visibility was not at its best, but the low clicking sounds and the high-pitched squeaks were amazing enough. The dolphins did not seem bothered by my presence in the water above them. Sometimes, they would rush by so close that I could feel the pressure-wave as they passed. 

I personally found it more rewarding to sit on the bow of the boat and watch as the surface of the sea all around filled with their perfectly arching dolphin backs. Some of the more advanced snorkellers were able to dive down with these dolphins, an experience they clearly enjoyed. 

In fact, they are very sociable animals, always supporting each other within the pod. The guides are beginning to recognize some of the local dolphins by the markings on their backs, and some individuals appear time after time.

Indeed, the pod we had found, on some hidden signal, suddenly turned away from the boat and headed off in the same direction at high speed. We watched as hundreds of backs broke through the water's surface at the same time, disappearing into the distance. 

They had finally finished feeding and were content to play alongside as they showed us the way home. The sun beamed down, and as each dolphin broke the surface of the water and exhaled, a rainbow would form a few seconds in the mist. It was an enchanting experience.

(Adapted from FCE)

You are going to read a magazine article about students who have travelled the world before going to university. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

Taking off

Five young people remember their 'gap year' experiences when they travelled the world between finishing school and going to university.

A. Tom Baker
After my exams, I read through all the gap year literature, but I'd had enough of having to turn up to lessons every day at school. So I flew to New Zealand, without any structured plans, just to see what happened. I had to live very cheaply, so I didn't use public transport, preferring to hitch-hike the long distances between the towns. I was amazed how generous people were. I was always being picked up by strangers and invited into their homes after nothing more than a conversation at the roadside. My hosts invited me to climb volcanoes, go trekking with them, even play a part in a short film. In a way, I learned just as much about life as I did when I was at university back in the UK. 

B. Robin Talbot
It all began when I was on summer holiday staying at a friend's house in New York. By the autumn, I was convinced I didn't want to leave and I stayed there for a year. I worked three days a week in a bar and two nights in a restaurant, which gave me plenty to live on. The Brazilian band that worked in the bar offered me a room in their apartment, and we played salsa music and had barbecues all summer. I realised eventually that I couldn't be a waiter forever, so I came back to university.

C. Mark Irvin
I couldn't face another three years studying straight after school so, like many of my classmates, I decided to do a round-the-world trip. I wanted to set off at the end of the summer, but it took six months of working before I had enough money. I'd planned my route so that I'd be travelling with friends for part of the way and alone the rest of the time. In Japan, I met some incredibly generous people who invited me into their homes. I found their culture fascinating. But in Australia it was less interesting because it was more difficult to meet the locals, as I could only afford to stay in hostels and these were full of British travellers like me.

D. Simon Barton
Going to Latin America was quite a courageous decision for me, and the first time I had travelled without a fixed route or any companions. I was worried that my last-minute Spanish course would not be enough. I was originally planning to fly to Mexico, then go overland by bus to Belize, but a hurricane intervened and it was too risky. So I went west by bus to Guatemala. The people were very friendly, but as I'm blond-haired and blue-eyed they stared a bit, which didn't bother me. I just smiled. I dutifully kept all my important stuff on me, as suggested in the World Travellers' Guidebook, but I didn't run into any trouble at all. And despite what I thought might happen, I ate anything and everything and didn't have any problems. It was great! I'm already saving for my next trip.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Which student needed not have worried about health problems?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student had to delay the start of his trip?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student was concerned about an aspect of his preparations for the trip?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student gained unexpected benefits from a limited budget?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student found different ways of earning money while he was away from home?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student was unaccustomed to travelling alone?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student wanted to avoid having a fixed programme?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student found accommodation through some colleagues?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student was forced to alter his route?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student disliked the restrictions of a limited budget?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton