FCE 2021 Test 2 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

2/24/2021 1:55:00 PM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

Mount Fuji

For the Japanese, Mount Fuji has long been the ultimate symbol of beauty. It is incredibly beautiful when seen from any at all times of day and in any season. But the mountain does not only a major part in the landscape — it has also inspired poets and artists for centuries, and has come to be identified with Japan itself. From the top, the sides of the mountain away, then flatten out before reaching the ground. Here, at ground , the foot of the mountain forms an almost perfect circle. To the north of Mount Fuji the famous 'Five Lakes'. The lakeside area is a sea of colour in spring, when the fruit trees are flowering, and it is also a stunning in autumn, when the leaves turn first brilliant red, then many shades of brown. , many of the best views of Mount Fuji are from these lakes, whose still waters reflect the mountain's beautifully symmetrical outline like a mirror. Both Mount Fuji and its lakes are volcanic in and that is probably why traditional stories say that Mount Fuji appeared overnight; and, for the same reason, it may one day vanish just as suddenly! 

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

SAVING THE TIGER

In 1973, when the tiger appeared to be facing extinction, the World Wide Fund for Nature and Indian Government agreed to set 'Operation Tiger’ -  a campaign to save this threatened creature. They started by creating nine special parks that tigers could live in safety. The first was at Ranthambhore, a region which was quickly turning into a desert too much of the grass was being eaten by the local people’s cattle. At the time there were just fourteen tigers left there. The government had to clear twelve small villages, which meant moving nearly 1,000 people and 10,000 cattle so the land could be handed back to nature.

Today, Ranthambhore is a very different place, with grass tall for tigers to hide in, and there are now at least forty of them in the park, wandering freely about. Other animals have also benefited. For example, there are many deer and monkeys than before. The people were moved are now living in better conditions. They live in new villages away from the tiger park, with schools, temples and fresh water supplies. There are now sixteen such tiger parks in India and the animals future looks little safer.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

THE LONDON UNDERGROUND MAP 

The London Underground map is extremely well designed. Simple, easy to understand and (ATTRACT), it performs its primary task of guiding both inhabitants and tourists round the underground System in London very well. The man behind this great achievement was called Henry Beck, an (EMPLOY) of the London Underground Drawing Office, who designed the map in 1931. The design of the map showed great (ORIGINAL) because it represented a complex network of communication (UNCLEAR). This design was later used by most of the world's underground Systems. The map used before 1931 was (MESS) and unclear. So Beck decided to sketch out a better one using a diagram rather than a (TRADITION) map. This new map was an enormous (SUCCEED) with the public when, in 1933, it made its first (APPEAR) on underground platforms and at station entrances.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

If Cheryl doesn't train harder, she'll never get into the swimming team. (does)

=> Cheryl will never get into the swimming team more training.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Could you look after my cat while I'm away on holiday? (care)

=> Would you mind my cat while I'm away on holiday?

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

He described the hotel to us in detail. (detailed)

=> He of the hotel.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

The TV programme was so complicated that none of the children could understand it. (too)

=> The TV programme was the children to understand.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

As a result of the strong wind last night, several tiles came off the roof. (because)

=> Several tiles came off the roof so strong last night.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Luke knocked over the old lady's bicycle by accident. (mean)

=> Luke knock over the old lady's bicycle.

You are going to read an extract from a short story. Choose the answer which you think fits best according to the text.

We always went to Ireland in June. Ever since the four of us began to go on holidays together we had spent the first fortnight of the month at Glencorn Lodge in County Antrim. It's a large house by the sea, not far from the village of Ardbeag. The English couple who bought the house, the Malseeds, have had to add to the building, but everything has been done most discreetly.

It was Strafe who found Glencorn for us. He'd come across an advertisement in the days when the Malseeds still felt the need to advertise. 'How about this?' he said one evening and read out the details. We had gone away together the summer before, to a hotel that had been recommended by friends, but it hadn't been a success because the food was so appalling.

The four of us have been playing cards together for ages, Dekko, Strafe, Cynthia and me. They call me Milly, though strictly speaking my name is Dorothy Milson. Dekko picked up his nickname at school, Dekko Deacon sounding rather good, I suppose. He and Strafe were at school together, which must be why we call Strafe by his surname as the teachers used to. We're all about the same age and live quite close to the town where the Malseeds were before they decided to make the change from England to Ireland. Quite a coincidence, we always think.

'How very nice,' Mrs Malseed said, smiling her welcome again this year. Some instinct seems to tell her when guests are about to arrive, for she's rarely not waiting in the large, low-ceilinged hall that always smells of flowers. 'Arthur, take the luggage up,' she commanded the old porter. 'Rose, Tulip, Lily and Geranium.' She referred to the names of the rooms reserved for us. Mrs Malseed herself painted flowers on the doors of the hotel instead of putting numbers. In winter, when no one much comes to Glencorn Lodge, she sees to little details like that; her husband sees to redecoration and repairs.

'Well, well, well,' Mr Malseed said, now entering the hall through the door that leads to the kitchen. 'A hundred thousand welcomes,' he greeted us in the Irish manner. He was smiling broadly with his dark brown eyes twinkling, making us think we were rather more than just another group of hotel guests. Everyone smiled, and I could feel the others thinking that our holiday had truly begun. Nothing had changed at Glencorn, all was well. Kitty from the dining room came out to greet us. 'You look younger every year, all four of you,' she said, causing everyone in the hall to laugh again. Arthur led the way to the rooms, carrying as much of our luggage as he could manage and returning for the remainder.

After dinner we played cards for a while but not going on for as long as we might because we were still quite tired after the journey. In the lounge there was a man on his own and a French couple. There had been other people at dinner, of course, because in June Glencorn Lodge is always full: from where we sat in the window we could see some of them strolling about the lawns, others taking the cliff path down to the seashore. In the morning we'd do the same: we'd walk along the sands to Ardbeag and have coffee in the hotel there, back in time for lunch. In the afternoon we'd drive somewhere.

I knew all that because over the years this kind of pattern had developed. Since first we came here, we'd all fallen hopelessly in love with every variation of its remarkable landscape.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

What did Dekko and the writer have in common?

  • They did not like their names.
  • People used their surnames when speaking to them.
  • They chose their own nicknames.
  • People did not call them by their real names.

What was special about the rooms at Glencorn Lodge?

  • They had been painted by Mrs Malseed herself.
  • There was no paint on the doors.
  • They did not have numbers.
  • There were different flowers in all of them.

What did the writer particularly like about Mr Malseed?

  • He had nice brown eyes.
  • Не always came to welcome them.
  • Не made guests feel like friends.
  • He spoke in the Irish way.

Why did the writer feel contented after Mr Malseed had spoken?

  • Everything was as it had always been.
  • The holiday would start at any moment.
  • A few things had improved at Glencorn.
  • Her friends had enjoyed the holiday.

What did Kitty do which made the friends laugh?

  • She told them a joke.
  • She pretended to insult them.
  • She laughed when she saw them.
  • She paid them a compliment.

The next day the friends would walk to Ardbeag because _______

  • they would be able to walk on the sands.
  • this was what they always did.
  • they wanted to do the same as other people.
  • it was quite a short walk for them.

You are going to read a magazine article about a new hotel. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. For guests, though, it is the other technology offered in their rooms which is most likely to find favour.

B. Being part of the hotel site has huge benefits, both for him and the hotel itself.

C. Extra cables have been laid to handle whatever scientific advances may occur.

D. He expects fifty per cent of the rooms to be occupied in the hotel's first year.

E. Another hi-tech system controls this essential area of comfort.

F. However, for details of his guests' preferences, he relies on the hotel's computer system.

G. The one hundred and forty-five bedrooms, large and well-furnished, are both comfortable and welcoming.

Five-star luxury meets up-to-date technology

The five-star Merrion Hotel, which has just opened, is the result of considerable research into customer requirements and nearly two years' work converting four large eighteenth-century houses in Dublin. Creating a new hotel in this way has allowed the latest technology to be installed. This has been done for the benefit of staff and guests alike.

At the Merrion, General Manager Peter MacCann expects his staff to know the guests by name. It can deal with return clients in the extra-special way that is appropriate to a five-star hotel.

Though the system cost $250,000 to install, it will pay for itself over time, according to MacCann. He praises its efficiency and talks enthusiastically of the facilities it offers. For example, a guest who requests certain music CDs during a first stay will find those same CDs ready for him on a return visit. This is thanks to the guest-history facility which allows staff to key in any number of preferences.

Hotel guests the world over frequently complain about room temperature. Guests have the opportunity to change the temperature themselves within three degrees either side of the normal 18°C but, in addition, each individual room can be adjusted by any amount between 14°C and 25°C at the front desk.

This is particularly true for the business user, and MacCann estimates that up to sixty-five per cent of his business will come from this part of the market. To provide the best service for such needs, the hotel has taken the traditional business centre and put it into individual bedrooms. Each one has three phones, two phone lines, a fax machine that doubles as a photocopier and printer, and a video-conferencing facility.

Technology changes so quickly these days that the hotel has had to try to forecast possible improvements. The televisions are rented rather than bought, so that they can be replaced with more up-to-date models at any time. DVD recorders can also be upgraded when necessary.

Despite the presence of all this very up-to-the-minute equipment in the rooms, MacCann says they have tried hard not to make guests feel threatened by the technology. There are, of course, a swimming pool and gym, six conference rooms, two bars and two restaurants, and a beautiful garden at the heart of it all.

As at all luxury hotels, the food that is offered to guests must be excellent. Chef Patrick Guilbaud's Dublin restaurant already had two Michelin stars when he agreed to move his restaurant business to the Merrion. He has been able to design a new kitchen and take it into the modern age. There are better parking facilities than at the previous address, too. From the hotel's side, they are able to offer a popular and successful place to eat, with no financial risks attached.

Aided by technology and a highly capable staff, the Merrion looks likely to succeed.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

You are going to read an article about guidebooks to London. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

London Guidebooks

Visitors to London, which has so much to offer, need all the help they can get. Alastair Bickley takes his pick of the capital's guidebooks.

Guidebook A
This is the latest in the longest-standing series of budget guides and, unlike its competitors, it is still definitely aimed at young backpackers. Its description of the sights is less detailed than most and the accuracy of some of the information is surprisingly poor for such a regularly updated publication. However, it manages to cram in everything of significance, and is strongly weighted towards practicalities and entertainment.

Guidebook B
This book is beautifully illustrated, with cutaway diagrams of buildings and bird's-eye-view itineraries rather than plain maps. This is a model of the clear, professional design that is the recognisable trademark of this series. Its coverage of the main sights is strong, and visually it's a real treat a delight to own as a practical guide. It's a bit pricey but well worth a look when you visit the bookshop.

Guidebook C
Probably the best-suited for a longish stay in the city. This guide surpasses its competitors in its sheer depth of knowledge and in the detail it provides. It's particularly handy for the thorough stroller with plenty of time on his or her hands, covering virtually every building or monument of any interest — and with well-drawn maps of each area. Its coverage of all types of restaurants, which encourages you to go out and try them, can also be appreciated from the comfort of your armchair. 

Guidebook D
It is astonishing -- and perhaps the greatest tribute one can pay to London as a city - that it's possible to have a high-quality holiday there and scarcely spend anything on admission charges. In this guide, the obvious bargains (National Gallery, British Museum, etc.) are almost lost among an impressive range of places which cost nothing to visit. It should pay more attention to the numerous wonderful churches in the City of London but otherwise this is a must for the seriously budget-conscious or the Londoner who is looking for something different (like me). The book itself isn't quite free, but at £4.95 you have to admit it's not far off it.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Which guidebook is frequently revised?

  • Guidebook A
  • Guidebook B
  • Guidebook C
  • Guidebook D

Which guidebook is quite expensive?

  • Guidebook A
  • Guidebook B
  • Guidebook C
  • Guidebook D

Which guidebook's appearance is similar to other books by the same publisher?

  • Guidebook A
  • Guidebook B
  • Guidebook C
  • Guidebook D

Which guidebook contains some errors?

  • Guidebook A
  • Guidebook B
  • Guidebook C
  • Guidebook D

Which guidebook is reasonably priced?

  • Guidebook A
  • Guidebook B
  • Guidebook C
  • Guidebook D

Which guidebook has always been produced with a particular market in mind?

  • Guidebook A
  • Guidebook B
  • Guidebook C
  • Guidebook D

Which guidebook omits some sights which should be included?

  • Guidebook A
  • Guidebook B
  • Guidebook C
  • Guidebook D

Which guidebook contains more information than other guides?

  • Guidebook A
  • Guidebook B
  • Guidebook C
  • Guidebook D

Which guidebook might appeal to London residents?

  • Guidebook A
  • Guidebook B
  • Guidebook C
  • Guidebook D

Which guidebook's information about places to eat is enjoyable to read?

  • Guidebook A
  • Guidebook B
  • Guidebook C
  • Guidebook D