FCE Test 3 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

3/4/2021 5:26:00 PM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

THE MUSTARD SHOP

Norwich, a city in the east of English, is a popular shopping center for thousands of people. In particular, visitors love to the small, unusual shops hidden away in Norwich's narrow streets. The Mustard shop is usually high on everybody's of interesting shops to see.

The link between mustard, a type of sauce, and Norwich back to the nineteenth century. Jeremiah Colman began to make mustard in 1814 in a nearby village. The yellow fields, full of mustard flowers whose seeds were required for Colman's factory, soon changed the appearance of the local . The company expanded rapidly and in 1854 it moved to suburb on the of Norwich. By this time, Colman's mustard was famous in many countries. The company is still in and many people continue to enjoy eating mustard with meat, cheese and other food.

In 1973, the company opened The Mustard Shop. It is a careful reproduction of a typical mustard shop of a hundred years ago and sells a wide of mustards. Upstairs there is a small museum where visitors can a collection of old Colman's posters and an exhibition explaining the history of mustard. It is a shop not to be missed when visiting Norwich.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

Dealing with waste plastic

Every year people throw away millions of tonnes of plastic bottles, boxes and wrapping. These create huge mountains of waste that are extremely hard to get of. Now a new recycling process promises to reduce this problem by turning old plastic new.

Scientists have taken a long time to develop their ideas because waste plastic has always been a bigger problem substances like waste paper. You can bury plastic, but it takes many years to break down. If you burn it, it just becomes another form of pollution. A products, for example bottles, can be re-used, but it is expensive or difficult to do this with a lot of plastic products.

Now a group of companies has developed a new method of recycling that could save almost plastic waste. Nearly every type of waste plastic can be used: it does have to be sorted. In addition, labels and ink may be left the products. Everything is simply mixed together heated to more than 400 degrees centigrade so that it melts. It is then cooled, producing a waxy substance that can be used to make new plastic products, including computer hardware. 

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

WHAT SPOILS THE OPERA FOR ME!

As far as I am concerned nothing spoils a visit to the opera more than the (DISGUST) noise made by some members of the audience to express their (APPROVE) of a production. There was a time when applause, and shouts of ‘bravo’, were thought to be sufficient. More (RECENT), however, the practice, which I first met in the United States, of screaming ‘Yo!’ or something similar, has spread to (EUROPE) audiences. It’s a stupid sound, quite (SUIT) for the expression of your appreciation of fine (SING) like the Spaniard, Placido Domingo. l'm not too keen, either, on musicians clapping (SELF) at the end of a performance. They are hardly likely to be fair in their (JUDGE) at that moment. However, I don't imagine either of these fashions is likely to disappear in the near future.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Jim fell off his bike because he wasn't looking where he was going. (paying)

=> If Jim to where he was going, he wouldn't have fallen off his bike.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

The last time I saw Tom was the day he got married in 1995. (wedding)

=> I haven't day in 1995. 

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

A very friendly taxi driver drove us into town. (driven)

=> We a very friendly taxi driver.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

lf we’d arrived a moment later we would have missed the ferry. (in)

=> We arrived the ferry.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Nina's parents said she wasn't to use their new camera. (let)

=>  Nina's parents use their new camera.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

We didn't enjoy our walk along the seafront because it was so windy. (prevented)

=> The strong wind our walk along the seafront.

You are going to read an article about a London tour guide. Choose the answer which you think fits best according to the text.

The best kind of know-it-all

There is an art to being a good tour guide and Martin Priestly knows what it is. 

It's obvious that the best way to explore a city is with a friend who is courteous, humorous, intelligent and — this is essential — extremely well-informed. Failing that, and if it is London you are visiting, then the next best thing may be Martin Priestly, former university lecturer, now a guide, who seems to bring together most of the necessary virtues and who will probably become a friend as well.

Last spring, I took a trip around London with him, along with a party of Indian journalists. Accustomed to guides who are occasionally excellent but who often turn out to be arrogant, repetitive and sometimes bossy, I was so struck by Priestly's performance that I sought him out again to see, if I could, just how the trick was done.

This time the tour was for a party of foreign students, aged anything between 20 and 60, who were here to improve their English, which was already more than passable. As the 'tourists' gathered, Martin welcomed them with a kind of dazzled pleasure, as if he had been waiting for them with excitement and a touch of anxiety, now thankfully relieved. I have to say, all this seemed absolutely genuine. 

Then we got on the coach and we were off. Martin sat in front, not in the low-level guide's seat, but up with the group, constantly turning round to make eye contact, to see if they understood him. Soon we're in a place called Bloomsbury, famous among writers in the early 20th century. 'Bloomsbury is famous for brains,' says Martin, getting into his stride. 'It's a very clever place. It's not very fashionable but it's very clever.' Soon after, we pass the British Museum and Bedford Square, 'a great architectural showpiece', advises Martin. The comment prompted questions which led to a conversation about building, the part played by wealthy people and how big chunks of London still belonged to them — an issue which was to re-emerge later. This was how he liked to work: themes, introduced as if spontaneously, were laid down for subsequent discussion. 

Suddenly the coach stopped and it was over, two and a half hours of non-stop performance, with information, observation and humour. Martin says encouragingly, 'I do hope you enjoy London.'

We go to a nearby café to talk. Why, I asked, had he become a guide? 'Well, I used to organise a lot of courses at the university I worked for. It was quite stressful. But I had shown students around London and I enjoyed that. It seemed an obvious move to make. I did the London Tourist Board's Blue Badge course — two evenings a week for two years. That was tough, especially the exam in what is known as "coaching". You're taught to smile but everybody had difficulty with that in the exam, when you have other things to worry about. You have to do it backwards in the coach, desperately casting your eyes about to see what is coming next, and you're facing the tutors and the other trainees. 

'And you have to know so much to guide well, different places, all kinds of architecture, agriculture. What if somebody asks a question about a crop beside the road? But some of it sticks, you know ... eventually.' He also tells me he keeps himself up to date with radio, TV and newspapers.

There are several hundred other guides out there, all looking for a share of the work. I think, as we talk, that I am starting to understand why good guides are so rare. It's a great deal harder than it looks, and it demands, for every stretch of road, an even longer stretch of study and forethought. 

What do we learn about Martin in the first paragraph?

  • He has two educational roles.
  • He is a colleague of the writer.
  • His job is an extension of his hobby.
  • His job suits his personality.

The writer decided to meet Martin again to find out how he managed to ______

  • win custom from other tour guides.
  • entertain large and varied tour groups.
  • avoid the failings of many other tour guides.
  • encourage people to go back to him for another tour.

The writer notes that on meeting the tour group, Martin _______

  • greeted everyone warmly.
  • seemed as nervous as everyone else.
  • praised everyone for their prompt arrival.
  • checked that everyone could understand him.

Martin's approach to guiding is to ______

  • begin with the oldest buildings.
  • encourage tourist participation.
  • move around the coach as he talks.
  • find out how much visitors know first.

Martin says that the 'coaching' exam is difficult because _______

  • there is so much to think about.
  • you have to smile in different ways.
  • it has so many sections.
  • you have to cover different routes.

In the last paragraph, the writer says he is impressed by _______

  • the distances Martin covers on his tours.
  • the quantity of work available for tour guides.
  • the amount of preparation involved in Martin's job.
  • the variety of approaches taken to guiding.

You are going to read a newspaper article about a man who is running round the world. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. I did it for him. Even though he already holds the world long-distance running record, he still needs to continue proving he is keeping up a reasonable running speed.

B. He has not yet sorted out a route and appears surprised when I tell him that there are no proper roads across it, as local people prefer to use the rivers instead. 

C. He's done this by selling his story to journalists. He is very aware that he is a marketable product. 

D. He has learned that you must take only what you will use. He has no medical supplies and no proper waterproofs. 

E. So he is a touchingly solitary figure. He is too mobile to be able to make many friends, although he did meet someone in Australia who cycled next to him for 600 kilometres.

F. Next week he heads off north, towards the Amazon, hoping to run to New York. After that, he just has to take care of Africa and Antarctica.

G. Fortunately, the cold and the rain don't seem to bother him, It is partly his strength of character that made him refuse to take health insurance.

The Runningman

Bryan Green, a 32-year-old from London, calls himself the 'Runningman'. He runs and keeps on running through towns, cities, up mountains and across rivers. Green has set his sights on running round the world. 

The Runningman recently arrived in Rio de Janeiro in Brazil via a roundabout route: he left London four years ago and ran through Europe to China.

He then flew to the north of Japan and ran to Osaka in the south. In Australia he ran from Perth to Sydney, and then he began in the Americas, bringing his current total to 23 countries, 45,000 kilometres and 30 pairs of trainers.

When I met Green in Rio, he had just run 70 kilometres, his daily average. He was holding in one hand a two-litre bottle of fizzy juice and in the other a piece of paper that he needed someone to sign, to confirm the time at which he had arrived. 

He travels light, carrying with him less than many people take to work. In his backpack he has a palmtop computer, a digital video camera, a Nikon 35mm camera, a map, a toothbrush and one change of clothes. 'The original idea was just to see the world,' he told me. 'But, as I soon realised, I could make myself a future. I have Iearnt how to make money out of what I do.' He started off with ₤20 in his pocket and estimates that he has earned about ₤60,000 so far.  And there is something of the explorer about him. 'Of course, I've found some places easier than others,' he says.

Apart from the day in south Australia where it was 45°C in the shade and he collapsed, Australia is, he says, perfect running country. This compares to his experiences in temperatures of —30°C in parts of Asia. At one point on that stage of the journey, Green got lost and was unable to find enough to eat. But generally he has been lucky with his health: he has not been injured and has never fallen ill.

He speaks no language apart from English and, with no space for a dictionary, has a plastic-covered sheet of A4 paper with a dozen useful phrases in various languages. Over dinner he is keen to talk about the Amazon jungle.

However, perhaps the point of a run like Green's is not to indulge in proper preparation. Its beauty is in the improvisation. 'I don't really analyse the run anymore, I just do it,' he says.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

You are going to read an article about the effect of advertising on children. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

Young Shoppers

A. Supermarket shopping with children, one mother says, is absolute a murder: "They want everything they see. If it's not the latest sugar-coated breakfast cereal, it's a Disney video or a comic. Usually all three. I can't afford all this stuff and, anyway, if I agree to their demands I feel I've been persuaded against my better judgment and I feel guilty about buying and feeding them rubbish. Yet I hate myself for saying no all the time, and I get cross and defensive in anticipation as we leave home. I do my best to avoid taking them shopping but then I worry that I'm not allowing them to have the experience they need in order to make their own choices. I can't win."

B. Research has found that children taken on a supermarket trip make a purchase request every two minutes. More than £150 million a year is now spent on advertising directly to children, most of it is on television. That figure is likely to increase and it is in the supermarket aisles that the investment is most likely to be successful. For children, the reasons behind their parents' decisions about what they can and cannot afford are often unclear, and arguments about how bad sugar is for their teeth are unconvincing when compared with the attractive and emotionally persuasive advertising campaigns.

C. According to Susan Dibb of the National Food Alliance, "Most parents are concerned about what they give their children to eat and have ideas about what food is healthy - although those ideas are not always accurate. Obviously, such a dialogue between parents and children is a good thing, because if the only information children are getting about products is from TV advertising, they are getting a very one-sided view. Parents resent the fact that they are competing with the advertising industry and are forced into the position of repeatedly disappointing their children." The Independent Television Commission, which regulates TV advertising, prohibits advertisers from telling children to ask their parents to buy products. But, as Dibb points out, "The whole purpose of advertising is to persuade the viewer to buy something. So even if they cannot say, "Tell your mum to buy this product," the intended effect is precisely that."

D. A major source of stress for some parents shopping with children is the mental energy required to decide which demands should be agreed to and which should be refused. One mother says she has patience when it comes to discussing food with her children, but she still feels unhappy about the way she manages their shopping demands: "My son does pay attention to advertisements but he is critical of them. We talk a lot about different products and spend time looking at labels. I've talked about it so much that I've brainwashed him into thinking all adverts are rubbish. We have very little conflict in the supermarket now because the children don't ask for things I won't want to buy."

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Which section mentions the influence a parent has had over their child's views?

  • Section A
  • Section B
  • Section C
  • Section D

Which section mentions the fact that children do not understand why their parents refuse their demands?

  • Section A
  • Section B
  • Section C
  • Section D

Which section mentions a family who rarely argue while shopping?

  • Section A
  • Section B
  • Section C
  • Section D

Which section mentions someone who feels children ought to find out for themselves how to make decisions about what to buy?

  • Section A
  • Section B
  • Section C
  • Section D

Which section mentions the fact that parents can be mistaken about what food is good for their children?

  • Section A
  • Section B
  • Section C
  • Section D

Which section mentions a parent who regrets buying what their children have asked for?

  • Section A
  • Section B
  • Section C
  • Section D

Which section mentions a parent who feels annoyed even before the children ask for anything?

  • Section A
  • Section B
  • Section C
  • Section D

Which section mentions the fact that parents blame the advertisers for the difficult situation they find themselves in?

  • Section A
  • Section B
  • Section C
  • Section D

Which section mentions the regularity of children's demands?

  • Section A
  • Section B
  • Section C
  • Section D

Which section mentions the need for parents to discuss food with their children?

  • Section A
  • Section B
  • Section C
  • Section D