FCE Test 5 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

4/9/2021 4:06:00 PM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

LEARNING TO MAKE A PERFECT PIZZA

According  to  the  European  Pizza-Makers' Association,  making  a  good  pizza  is  not  a straightforward skill to learn. The ingredients seem very simple: flour, yeast, water and a bit of salt. But water and flour can easily glue and anyone who has eaten a poor quality pizza will know how bad it can make your stomach .

'In Italy, 70 percent of pizza makers could improve on their product, not to all the pizza makers around the world who serve uneatable meals,' says Antonio Primiceri, the Association's founder. He has now started a pizza school in an attempt to provide the reputation of this traditional dish. As part of an course, the students at Mr. Primiceri's school are taught to avoid common mistakes, produce a good basic mixture, add a tasty topping and cook the pizza properly. Test the finished pizza by breaking the crust,' advises Mr. Primiceri. ‘If the soft inside the pizza is white, clean and dry, it's a good pizza. If it is not like this, the pizza will ache your stomach. You will feel full and also thirsty.’

In Italy alone, the pizza industry has an annual turnover of more than $12 billion. Mr. Primiceri that there are 10,000 jobs in pizza restaurants waiting to be by those with real skill. ‘If you are a good pizza cook, you will never be without a job.’ he says.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

THE INFERNO SKI RACE 

The Inferno is the oldest and most celebrated of all amateur ski races. is held every year, on a Saturday in the middle of January, above remote village of Mürren in Switzerland. Anyone can take part, as as they belong to a ski racing club and pay the race fee.

The Inferno was, strangely enough, a British invention. The story begins with a former tennis racquet salesman called Henry Lunn, who came up the idea of the package holiday in the early 1900s and began taking groups of British people to the Alps for winter sports. Henry’s son, Arnold, grew very fond Mürren and he founded a ski club there in 1924, which he called the Kandahar. Four years later, seventeen of the club’s members took part in the first Inferno race, from the top of the 2,970 metre Schilthorn mountain to Mürren below.

In those early days, they had to climb for six hours from the railway terminus in Mürren to the start of the race. Today, racers can use a cable car which about twenty minutes. In the first race, the winning time for the fourteen-kilometre race was one hour, twelve minutes. days it tends to be almost exactly an hour less. Although the skiers are very faster now, some things haven't changed. The course, which is steep and has sharp bends, remains one of the most demanding and frightening in the world.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

AUSTRALIA

For years, Australia has had an irregular pattern of population distribution, with more people living in towns and cities in (COAST) areas, especially the east and south-east, than in the interior of the country. Since the 1940s, the population has become still more (EVEN) distributed with a significant rise in the number of people living in these cities.

Cities are now the economic centres of the country. An important element in their (GROW) has been the number of people from Europe and Asia emigrating to Australia, especially in the second half of the twentieth century. The new (ARRIVE) decided to stay in the cities because (EMPLOY) was easy to find there. Today, the population of Australia includes people who originally came from over 150 countries.

At one time, what made the (CONCENTRATE) of people in Australia's cities so (REMARK) was the country's dependence on the export of agricultural produce - indeed, the country's economy was founded on the production of wheat and wool. This has since changed, not only with increased industrial activity but also with the rapid (EXPAND) of tourist and recreational facilities. Tourism is now Australia's largest export industry.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Today's meeting is postponed and it will be held next week. (PUT)

=> Today's meeting has until next week.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

My aunt was determined to pay for our tickets. (INSISTED)

=> My aunt for our tickets.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

"Do you realise what the time is, Steve?" asked Chris. (WHAT)

=> Chris asked Steve it was.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

On arriving at an airport, I usually go straight to the check-in desk. (SOON)

=> I usually go straight to the check-in desk as to an airport.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

The TV programme was so complicated that none of the children could understand it. (TOO)

=> The TV programme was the children to understand.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

We got lost coming home from the leisure centre. (WAY)

=> We couldn't from the leisure centre.

Read the passage then choose the best answer to each question.

Acting minus the drama

Harriet Walter has written a fascinating book about her profession, Benedicte Page reports.

It is not often that an experienced actor with a high public profile will sit down to answer in-depth the ordinary theatergoer's questions: how do you put together a character which isn't your own?; what is it like to perform the same play night after night?; or simply, why do you do it? Harriet Walter was prompted to write Other People's Shoes: Thoughts on Acting by a sense that many people's interest in theatre extended beyond the scope of entertainment chit-chat. "I was asked very intelligent, probing questions by people who weren't in the profession, from taxi drivers to dinner-party hosts to people in shopping queues. It made me realize that people have an interest in what we do which goes beyond show business gossip," she says.

Other People's Shoes avoids insider gossip and, mostly, autobiography: "If events in my life had had a huge direct influence, I would have put them in, but they didn't," Harriet says, though she does explain how her parents' divorce was a factor in her career. But the focus of the book is to share - remarkably openly - the inside experience of the stage and the rehearsal room, aiming to replace the false sense of mystery with a more realistic understanding and respect for the profession.

"There's a certain double edge to the publicity an actor can get in the newspapers: it gives you attention but, by giving it to you, simultaneously criticizes you," Harriet says. "People ask you to talk about yourself and then say, "Oh, actors are so self-centered." And the "sound-bite" variety of journalism, which touches on many things but never allows you to go into them in depth, leaves you with a sort of shorthand which reinforces prejudices and myths."

Harriet's career began in the 1970s and has included theatre performances with the Royal Shakespeare Company and television and film roles. She writes wittily about the embarrassments of the rehearsal room, as actors try out their half-formed ideas. And she is at pains to demystify the theatre: the question "How do you do the same play every night?" is answered by a simple comparison with the familiar car journey you take every day, which presents a slightly different challenge each time. "I was trying to get everyone to understand it isn't this extraordinary mystery and you're not visited by some spiritual inspiration every night."

Harriet's own acting style is to build up a character piece by piece. She says that this process is not widely understood: "There's no intelligent vocabulary out there for discussing the craft of building characters. Reviews of an actor's performance which appear in the newspapers are generally based on whether the reviewer likes the actors or not. It's not about whether they are being skillful or not, or how intelligent their choices are."

There remains something mysterious about slipping into "other people's shoes": "It's something like falling in love," Harriet says. "When you're in love with someone, you go in and out of separateness and togetherness. It's similar to acting and you can slip in and out of a character. Once a character has been built, it remains with you, at the end of a phone line, as it were, waiting for your call."

Harriet includes her early work in Other People's Shoes - "I wanted to separate myself from those who say, "What an idiot I was, what a load of nonsense we all talked in those days!"; it wasn't all rubbish, and it has affected how I approach my work and my audiences." And she retains from those days her belief in the vital role of the theatre.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Harriet Walter decided to write her book because she ______.

  • was tired of answering people's questions about acting
  • knew people liked to read about show business gossip
  • wanted to entertain people through her writing
  • wanted to satisfy people's curiosity about acting in the theatre

In paragraph two, we learn that Harriet's book aims to ______.

  • correct some of the impressions people have of the theatre
  • relate important details about her own life story
  • analyze the difficulties of a career in the theatre
  • tell the truth about some of the actors she has worked with
What problem do actors have with newspaper publicity?
  • It never focuses on the actors who deserve it.
  • It often does more harm than good.
  • It never reports what actors have actually said.
  • It often makes mistakes when reporting facts.

Harriet uses the example of the car journey to show that ______.

  • acting can be boring as well as rewarding
  • actors do not find it easy to try new ideas
  • actors do not deserve the praise they receive
  • acting shares characteristics with other repetitive activities

Harriet criticizes theatre reviewers because they _____.

  • do not give enough recognition to the art of character acting
  • do not realize that some parts are more difficult to act than others
  • choose the wrong kinds of plays to review
  • suggest that certain actors have an easy job

Harriet says that after actors have played a particular character, they _______.

  • may be asked to play other similar characters
  • may become a bit like the character
  • will never want to play the part again
  • will never forget how to play the part

You are going to read a newspaper article about human beings getting taller. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. Heights may have risen, but the world has not moved on, it seems.

B. As they benefit from the changes in agriculture, people expect to have this wide variety of foods available. 

C. In fact, we are returning to what we were like as cavemen.

D. This poor diet has had a disastrous effect on human health and physique.

E. Since the climate warmed, we appear to have got slightly thinner and smaller, even when properly fed. 

F. Nevertheless, from then on agriculture spread because a piece of farmed land could support ten times the number of people who had previously lived off it as hunter-gatherers. 

G. One research study found that they based their diet on 85 different wild plants, for example.

It's true - we're all getting too big for our boots

Chris Greener was fourteen when he told his careers teacher he wanted to join the navy when he left school. 'What do you want to be?' asked the teacher. 'The flagpole on a ship?' The teacher had a point — because Chris, though still only fourteen, was already almost two metres tall. Today, at 228 cm. he is Britain's tallest man. 

Every decade, the average height of people in Europe grows another centimetre. Every year, more and more truly big people are born. Intriguingly, this does not mean humanity is producing a new super race. Only now are we losing the effects of generations of poor diet - with dramatic effects. 'We are only now beginning to fulfil our proper potential,' says paleontologist Professor Chris Stringer. 'We are becoming Cro-Magnons again — the people who lived on this planet 40,000 years ago.'

For most of human history, our ancestors got their food from a wide variety of sources: women gathered herbs, fruits and berries, while men supplemented these with occasional kills of animals (a way of life still adopted by the world's few remaining tribes of hunter-gatherers). Then about 9,000 years ago, agriculture was invented — with devastating consequences. Most of the planet's green places have been gradually taken over by farmers, with the result that just three carbohydrate-rich plants — wheat, rice and maize provide more than half of the calories consumed by the human race today. 

Over the centuries we have lived on soups, porridges and breads that have left us underfed and underdeveloped. In one study in Ohio, scientists discovered that when they began to grow corn, healthy hunter-gatherers were turned into sickly, underweight farmers. Tooth decay increased, as did diseases. Far from being one of the blessings of the New World, corn was a public health disaster, according to some anthropologists.

The fact that most people relying on this system are poorly nourished and stunted has only recently been tackled, even by the world's wealthier nations. Only in Europe, the US and Japan are diets again reflecting the richness of our ancestors' diets.

As a result, the average man in the US is now 179 cm, in Holland 180 cm, and in Japan 177 cm. It is a welcome trend, though not without its own problems. A standard bed-length has remained at 190 cm since 1860. Even worse, leg-room in planes and trains seems to have shrunk rather than grown, while clothes manufacturers are constantly having to revise their range of products.

The question is: where will it all end? We cannot grow forever. We must have some programmed upper limit. But what is it? According to Robert Fogel, of Chicago University, it could be as much as 193 cm and we are likely to reach it some time this century.

However, scientists add one note of qualification. Individuals may be growing taller because of improved nutrition, but as a species we are actually shrinking. During the last ice age, 10,000 years ago, members of the human race were slightly rounder and taller - an evolutionary response to the cold. (Large, round bodies are best at keeping in heat.) And as the planet continues to heat up, we may shrink even further. In other words, the growth of human beings could be offset by global warming.

You are going to read a magazine article about people who make short films. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

A short cut to Hollywood

We meet the most successful young makers of short films in Britain. These short films usually last no more than ten minutes and are often shown before the main films in cinemas.

Kevin Teller and Justin O'Brien (Jumping Gerald)
Anyone who saw Together, the surprise arthouse hit, will have been as charmed by Jumping Gerald, the short film which ran before it, as they were by the main feature film itself. Yet Gerald's creators faced financial difficulties from the start, and the final version wasn't even finished until the eve of its first screening. As they sat in the cinema watching it for the first time, it dawned on Teller and O'Brien just what they had achieved. 'The way people were laughing,' Teller remembers, 'we knew we were on to a good thing.' Jumping Gerald was nominated for Best Short Film at the British Film Festival; although it missed out on the award, it was thought by many to have deserved it. The two men are presently involved in their second production. 'We make a good team,' Teller says, 'and we'll continue to work as one. Unless, of course, one of us gets an offer he can't refuse.'

The Collin brothers (Oh Josephine!)
Tim and Mark Collins first fell in love with the art of film-making when they were young boys. Their father was often abroad on business, and his two sons would send him video diaries to inform him of the goings-on at home. Several years later, their first short film was lucky ever to get made. At the time, Tim was writing a novel between takes, and Mark was preparing to get married. Oh Josephine! was made with a cast of hundreds for just S500, but it went on to win several video awards nevertheless. The film really began to get the brothers noticed, and several others followed, all exceptionally well-received. The brothers now feel ready to move into full-length feature films, and are busy writing a screenplay. The only disadvantage of having had such a perfect start to their careers is the weight of expectations: they have to keep coming up with the goods.

Brian Radley and Nicky Tomlinson (More Cake Please)
Radley and Tomlinson's very first short film, More Cake Please, was nominated for a prestigious award at the Cannes Film Festival. Tomlinson says, 'We couldn't believe it when we found ourselves on a red carpet at Cannes. No one knew who on earth we were, but that couldn't have mattered less.' Although More Cake Please didn't win, Radley and Tomlinson were sufficiently encouraged by the nominations to enter the film into Channel Four's short film competition at the British Film Festival. To their surprise it won, and their film-making career began to look even better with Channel Four's promise to fund their next project. The duo had chosen university courses — in media and drama — with a film-making future in mind but, disenchanted with the theoretical rather than practical experience of the industry that was provided, both men left university before completing their courses and went to work for production companies in London. They place enormous value on the hands-on experience that their work on film sets provided them with. 'We've seen so many directors get it wrong, that we kind of know how to get it right,' says Radley.

Hiroko Katsue and Mica Stevlovsky (The Big One)
Katsue and Stevlovsky speak fondly of the days when every feature film at the cinema was preceded by a short film. Katsue and Stevlovsky's short-film-making debut, The Big One, was rather unusual, as it became the cinema advertisement for Big Issue magazine. It won award after award. 'Winning a festival is great in that it raises your profile, but it doesn't mean you can rest on your laurels,' says Stevlovsky. 'Right, you can't just expect things to happen for you,' echoes Katsue. 'You could spend years going around festivals with the same old film, but we're not into that. We're always looking for different sorts of projects, never standing still. Even when we're lying on a beach on holiday, we both have ideas churning around in our heads.'

Which film-makers produced a short film at a very busy time in their lives?

  • Kevin Teller and Justin O'Brien
  • The Collin brothers
  • Brian Radley and Nicky Tomlinson
  • Hiroko Katsue and Mica Stevlovsky

Which film-makers are realistic about their future together?

  • Kevin Teller and Justin O'Brien
  • The Collin brothers
  • Brian Radley and Nicky Tomlinson
  • Hiroko Katsue and Mica Stevlovsky

Which film-makers mention the need to keep on working hard at producing short films?

  • Kevin Teller and Justin O'Brien
  • The Collin brothers
  • Brian Radley and Nicky Tomlinson
  • Hiroko Katsue and Mica Stevlovsky

Which film-makers made early career decisions that would lead them towards film-making?

  • Kevin Teller and Justin O'Brien
  • The Collin brothers
  • Brian Radley and Nicky Tomlinson
  • Hiroko Katsue and Mica Stevlovsky

Which film-makers gained financial assistance after impressing an organization in the film world?

  • Kevin Teller and Justin O'Brien
  • The Collin brothers
  • Brian Radley and Nicky Tomlinson
  • Hiroko Katsue and Mica Stevlovsky

Which film-makers like variety in their working lives?

  • Kevin Teller and Justin O'Brien
  • The Collin brothers
  • Brian Radley and Nicky Tomlinson
  • Hiroko Katsue and Mica Stevlovsky

Which film-makers were not concerned by the fact that nobody recognized them?

  • Kevin Teller and Justin O'Brien
  • The Collin brothers
  • Brian Radley and Nicky Tomlinson
  • Hiroko Katsue and Mica Stevlovsky

Which film-makers suddenly realized the great potential of their film?

  • Kevin Teller and Justin O'Brien
  • The Collin brothers
  • Brian Radley and Nicky Tomlinson
  • Hiroko Katsue and Mica Stevlovsky

Which film-makers now have a reputation for excellence which can put pressure on them?

  • Kevin Teller and Justin O'Brien
  • The Collin brothers
  • Brian Radley and Nicky Tomlinson
  • Hiroko Katsue and Mica Stevlovsky

Which film-makers felt their studies were not providing them with what they wanted?

  • Kevin Teller and Justin O'Brien
  • The Collin brothers
  • Brian Radley and Nicky Tomlinson
  • Hiroko Katsue and Mica Stevlovsky