FCE Test 6 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

4/26/2021 11:43:00 AM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

Under the city streets

While skyscraper offices and elegant apartment blocks remain the public of most major cities, these cities also have a mass of secret tunnels and hidden pipes below ground which keep everything working. This other world exists, forgotten or neglected by all but a tiny of engineers and historians. 

For example, there are more than 150 kilometres of rivers under the streets of London. Most have been over and, sadly, all that remains is their names. Perhaps the greatest loss to the city is the River Fleet, a great river which previously had beautiful houses on its banks. It now goes underground in the north of the city and into the River Thames by Blackfriars Bridge. 

The London Underground has 1000 kilometres of underground railway track winding under the capital and more than 100 stations below street level. Along some underground railway lines, commuters can sometimes catch a glimpse of the platforms of more than 40 closed stations which have been left under the city. Although some are used as film sets, most forgotten. Some have had their entrances on the street turned into restaurants and shops, but most entrances have been down.

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

A man of many parts

Life on a remote Scottish island is wonderfully peaceful. But for one local, Hamish McAlpine, life is far from relaxing. This is because Hamish has fourteen jobs. he meets me off the ferry, harbour master Hamish is the one and person in sight. Luckily, he is also the island's taxi driver, so he takes me to the hotel, which he owns. He can even be found serving behind the counter at the local shop. 

It all started not after Hamish married his wife Donna in 1964. The couple were asked they would like to run the post office. Then Hamish found himself agreeing to become fire chief, policeman and coastguard. Now, having given 35 years of devoted service, Hamish about to retire. But who will over his jobs? Can one person do it all or will the jobs have to be split up?

Apart from their week-long honeymoon on the mainland, the couple have had hardly holidays. 'Donna and I have worked together every day for the last 35 years. But who knows, once we have lots of time on our hands we find we can't stand the sight of each other,' says Hamish, his eyes twinkling mischievously.

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

RUNNING ROUND THE WORLD

John Shaw will shortly be setting off on a 50,000 km run, which will make him the first person to perform the (ORDINARY) act of running all the way round the world if he succeeds.

His timetable includes the (FREEZE) Russian winter and the burning African summer. And he has no back-up team for (ASSIST). He will be running alone, carrying all his equipment on his back.

'My biggest fear is not the physical challenge, but (LONELY),' Mr Shaw said. 'I'm as sociable as anyone and I'm very hopeful that I will form many (FRIEND) on the way.'

On a trial 2,000 km run under the blazing (HOT) of the African sun, he came across wild baboons and (POISON) snakes, but he proved that a target of 60 kilometres a day was (REASON). 'I've made up my mind to do it and I will. Running is my life,' he said.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

My brother accused me of taking his car. (took)

=> "You you?" said my brother.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Thomas would have gone to the meeting if he had not been so tired. (tired)

=> Thomas was to the meeting. 

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

How many cars can this company produce in a month? (by)

=> How many cars can in a month?

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Such success has not been achieved by many players in the world of ice hockey. (few)

=> Only such success in the world of ice hockey.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

The journey will be about nine hours, whichever route you take. (matter)

=> It you take, the journey will be about nine hours.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

On business trips, I prefer driving home to staying in a hotel overnight. (rather)

=> On business trips, I'd in a hotel overnight.

Read the passage then choose the best answer to each question.

An eye for detail 

Artist Susan Shepherd is best known for her flower paintings, and the large garden that surrounds her house is the source of many of her subjects. It is full of her favorite flowers, most especially varieties of tulips and poppies. Some of the plants are unruly and seed themselves all over the garden. There is a harmony of color, shape and structure in the two long flower borders that line the paved path which crosses the garden from east to west. Much of this is due to the previous owners, who were keen gardeners, and who left plants that appealed to Susan. She also inherited the gardener, Danny. 'In fact, it was really his garden,' she says. 'We got on very well. At first, he would say, "Oh, it's not worth it." to some of the things I wanted to put in, but when I said I wanted to paint them, he recognized what I had in mind.'

Susan prefers to focus on detailed studies of individual plants rather than on the garden as a whole, though she will occasionally paint a group of plants where they are. More usually, she picks them and then takes them up to her studio. 'I don't set the whole thing up at once,' she says. 'I take one flower out and paint it, which might take a few days, and then I bring in another one and build up the painting that way. Sometimes it takes a couple of years to finish.'

Her busiest time of year is spring and early summer, when the tulips are out, followed by the poppies. 'They all come out together, and you're so busy.' she says. But the gradual decaying process is also part of the fascination for her. With tulips, for example, 'you bring them in and put them in water, then leave them for perhaps a day and they each form themselves into different shapes. They open out and are fantastic. When you first put them in a vase, you think they are boring, but they change all the time with twists and turns.'

Susan has always been interested in plants: 'I did botany at school and used to collect wildflowers from all around the countryside,' she says. 'I wasn't particularly interested in gardening then, in fact, I didn't like garden flowers, I thought they were artificial - to me, the only real ones were wild.' Nowadays. the garden owes much to plants that: originated in far-off lands, though they seem as much at home in her garden as they did in China or the Himalayas. She has a come-what-may attitude to the garden, rather like an affectionate aunt who is quite happy for children to run about undisciplined as long as they don't do any serious damage.

With two forthcoming exhibitions to prepare for and a ready supply of subject-material at her back door, finding time to work in the garden has been difficult recently. She now employs an extra gardener but, despite the need to pain: she knows that to maintain her connection with her subject matter, 'you have to get your hands dirty'. 

In the first paragraph, the writer describes Susan's garden as ______

  • having caused problems for the previous owners.
  • having a path lined with flowers.
  • needing a lot of work to keep it looking attractive.
  • being only partly finished.

What does Susan say about Danny?

  • He felt she was interfering in his work.
  • He immediately understood her feeling.
  • He was recommended by the previous owners.
  • He was slow to see the point of some of her ideas.

What is Susan's approach to painting?

  • She will wait until a flower is ready to be picked before painting it.
  • She likes to do research on a plant before she paints it.
  • She spends all day painting an individual flower.
  • She creates her paintings in several stages.

Susan thinks that tulips _______.

  • are more colourful and better shaped than other flowers
  • are not easy to paint because they change so quickly
  • look best some time after they have been cut
  • should be kept in the house for as long as possible

How does the writer describe Susan's attitude to her garden?

  • She thinks children should be allowed to enjoy it.
  • She prefers planting wild flowers from overseas.
  • She likes a certain amount of disorder.
  • She dislikes criticism of her planting methods.

What point is Susan making in the final paragraph?

  • It's essential to find the time to paint even if there is gardening to be done.
  • It's important not to leave the gardening entirely to other people.
  • It's good to have expert help when you grow plants.
  • It's hard to do exhibitions if there are not enough plants ready in the garden.

You are going to read a magazine article about a cruise ship. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. It's a leisurely process — nobody is made to feel they have to rush their goodbyes or their packing.

B. Lorries full of supplies for the ship's stores are waiting to be unloaded. 

C. Hopefully, they haven't been missed amongst the loads of cornflakes and crisps that keep on coming, steered through the narrow corridors by dock workers in orange overalls.

D. It would take really extreme weather conditions to stop the ship departing and returning at the stated times, wherever it's sailing. 

E. These are entertained in the Tiffany Lounge area by a small group of musicians, playing pieces vaguely connected with the sea. 

F. Every so often, however, a loud crash announces the departure of another empty metal container. 

G. And today is no exception — in all, some 91 people are taking up or leaving their posts.

The Oriana turnaround 

When the cruise ship Oriana comes into port, it has just 12 hours to get everything ready for the 1,800 passengers on its next cruise. Chris Mersea joined the team for the day. 

It's 6.00 a.m., still dark, and above the rooftops of the port city of Southampton a large orange funnel suddenly appears. It's attached to the 69,000-tonne cruise ship Oriana, the pride of P&O Cruise Lines. Oriana has been home, for the past eleven days, to some 1,800 passengers. It will soon be home to 1,800 different passengers yet to arrive in Southampton, but who in twelve hours' time will be setting sail for the Atlantic islands of Madeira and Tenerife. 

In most small hotels the staff complain if they have to change more than ten bedrooms in one day. On Oriana, there are 900 cabins to be cleaned in just a few hours. As for having to stock up on food for a fortnight ahead, no hotel chef would hear of it. 

On board Oriana, however, working practices are shaped not by the attitude of individual members of the staff, but by time, tide and a rigid cruise schedule.

The first aim of the day is to have the last passengers off the ship and away by 10.30 a.m. Even so, passengers manage to drive off home having forgotten sunglasses, souvenirs and even pearl earrings. The staff often find jewellery that has fallen down the backs of beds and chairs, and at least one passenger always manages to arrive home without his house keys — by which time the ship could already be halfway back across the Atlantic.

While Oriana's armies of cabin stewards are changing sheets and looking for lost property, an enormous amount of activity is also taking place elsewhere on the ship. Everything from 10 tonnes of fish, to 108 new sun chairs, to a vanload of scenery for the ship's Rio Dance Spectacular has to be carefully checked in.

The biggest problems of the day are a set of waiters' uniforms that have disappeared and several thousand boiled sweets that don't seem to have turned up.

While all this is going on, there is also a large number of people coming and going. Turnaround day, according to the captain, starts off with an end-of-term feeling because a lot of the crew are saying goodbye, but then others are arriving to take their places. These include a replacement head waiter, a new swimming-pool attendant and a new piano act called the Bibby Sisters, who will contribute to the ship's entertainment programme during the cruise.

For the moment, though, the priority is to meet and greet the new passengers, who start coming on board as early as 1.30 p.m. Five hours later, back on dry land, the band will be playing their own version of Sailing, as Oriana heads out towards the open sea. It's a thrilling moment for the 1,800 men, women and children on board, who can look forward to eleven days of fun and relaxation.

You are going to read an article in which four young people are talking about sport. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

Young people and sport

A. Luke Hazleton
My mum is the team manager for the Olympic diving team and when I was a baby I used to go with her to the pool and jump in and out — now I practice diving every day after school and on Saturdays. I'm really too tall to be a great diver and my long legs make it difficult to do somersaults, so I don't think I'll ever make it to the top. But nevertheless, I find it exhilarating when I'm diving well. If it's a complicated dive, I have to concentrate very hard, which is difficult if I feel nervous. My dad's support is very motivating for me. I take part in about ten competitions a year, both national and international. The best thing about it is that you make new friends from different countries. I do trampolining for the regional team, which prepares me for diving — the moves are similar but you don't land in water! The one thing I don't like about it is that doing my homework takes up my spare time and I don't have much time to go out with my friends from school. 

B. Natalie Harris
Last year our netball team was promoted to the top league and so the coach became very strict. At that level, every move is scrutinized and discussed, which makes everyone feel very pressurized. There's a lot of competition to get chosen for the team and sometimes I got substituted. When I played last year, I would look at the subs sitting on the sidelines and not really care, but when I started to become one myself I had a whole new perspective on the game. Now I realize that when you're not the best at a sport it doesn't seem as much fun as when you're a top player. I left the team earlier this year, as the pressure of playing in matches was too much; it was becoming a frustration instead of a recreation. I still enjoy playing netball with my friends in gym classes, when I can relax without worrying about impressing my coach all the time. 

C. Joanne Whittaker
I was good at football and I really enjoyed playing left-back in the school team. Then one Saturday when I was 14, I went to watch the local ice hockey team play. It was so exciting and became a real turning point in my life. School football seemed so dull in comparison. I discovered that there was a local women's ice hockey team just being set up. At first, the coach thought I was too young and too inexperienced as I'd only done occasional fun skating on Saturday afternoons. But she agreed to give me a trial and I have been playing for three years now. I'll really find out what I can do in June when we go to take part in a women's international ice hockey competition in Prague. 

D. James Spiers
I knew I was serious about rugby when I scored a try in my first game. I was named 'player of the year' at my club last year and I'm also captain of my school team. My uncle often comes to watch me play. He's very competitive so that is probably why I am too. Losing makes me feel that I've done something wrong. It doesn't happen very often, though. I'm not normally an aggressive person but, on the rugby pitch, I am. I don't think girls should play rugby as it's so aggressive and they could easily get injured. Most of my schoolmates play rugby and all of them are sporty. I can't really imagine my life without rugby! I'm going to agricultural college when I leave school and eventually will take over my uncle's farm, but I hope there'll still be time for lots of rugby. If I have a son, I'll want to help coach his team and I'd be disappointed if he wasn't interested in sports. I'll definitely be a competitive dad! 

Which person thinks it is easier to perform well in their sport when they are calm?

  • Luke Hazleton
  • Natalie Harris
  • Joanne Whittaker
  • James Spiers

Which person feels their sport has both a positive and negative impact on their social life?

  • Luke Hazleton
  • Natalie Harris
  • Joanne Whittaker
  • James Spiers

Which person thinks winning is the most important thing?

  • Luke Hazleton
  • Natalie Harris
  • Joanne Whittaker
  • James Spiers

Which person was nearly refused a place on a team?

  • Luke Hazleton
  • Natalie Harris
  • Joanne Whittaker
  • James Spiers

Which person is realistic about their chances of being very successful?

  • Luke Hazleton
  • Natalie Harris
  • Joanne Whittaker
  • James Spiers

Which person has learned to be more sympathetic to less successful competitors?

  • Luke Hazleton
  • Natalie Harris
  • Joanne Whittaker
  • James Spiers

Which person has long-term plans which include continued involvement in their sport?

  • Luke Hazleton
  • Natalie Harris
  • Joanne Whittaker
  • James Spiers

Which person was inspired by seeing others take part in the sport?

  • Luke Hazleton
  • Natalie Harris
  • Joanne Whittaker
  • James Spiers

Which person thinks playing their sport changes their character?

  • Luke Hazleton
  • Natalie Harris
  • Joanne Whittaker
  • James Spiers

Which person feels that there is too much emphasis on analyzing performance?

  • Luke Hazleton
  • Natalie Harris
  • Joanne Whittaker
  • James Spiers