FCE Test 7 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

5/10/2021 10:05:00 AM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

Famous explorer

Captain James Cook is remembered today for being one of Britain's most famous explorers of the 18th century. Cook was most other explorers of the same period. He did not come from a wealthy family and had to work hard to his position in life. He was lucky to be noticed by his father's employer, who saw that he was a bright boy and paid for him to attend the village school. At sixteen, he started in a shop in a fishing village, and this was a turning in his life. He developed an interest in the sea and eventually joined the Royal Navy in order to see more of the world. 

Cook was by sailing, astronomy and the production of maps, and quickly became an expert in these subjects. He was also one of the first people to realize that scurvy, an illness often suffered by sailors, could be prevented by careful to diet. It was during his to the Pacific Ocean that Cook made his historic landing in Australia and the discovery that New Zealand was two separate islands. He became a national hero and still remains one today.

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

A new cruise ship 

One of the biggest passenger ships in history, the Island Princess, carries people on cruises around the Caribbean. More than double the weight of the Titanic (the large passenger ship which sank in 1912), it was large to be built in piece. Instead, 48 sections total were made in different places. The ship was then put together at a shipbuilding yard in Italy. 

The huge weight of the Island Princess is partly due to its enormous height, which is an incredible 41 metres. When compared with the Titanic, she is also a much broader ship. As as length is concerned, there's little difference the Island Princess is over 250 metres long, similar to the length of the Titanic

The Island Princess can carry to 2,600 passengers and has 1,321 cabins, including 25 specially designed for use by disabled passengers. There is entertainment on board to suit age and interest, from dancing to good drama. The Island Princess seems very likely to be a popular holiday choice for many years to come, even though most people will to save up in order to be to afford the trip.

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

Bigfoot

There are some people who believe in the existence of Bigfoot, a (MYSTERY) ape-like creature that is supposed to live in the mountains in the USA. In 1967 some hunters claimed to have (ACCIDENT) filmed such a creature. The brief film, showing a huge creature walking slowly through the undergrowth, was broadcast worldwide and caused quite a sensation. Many people saw this as firm proof that Bigfoot is real.

But now researchers have come to the (CONCLUDE) that the film is merely a trick. After conducting a close (ANALYSE) of it, they claim to have identified a man-made fastener at the creature's waist. Bigfoot is, therefore, unlikely to be anything more than a very large man dressed up in an animal suit. 

Some Bigfoot fans remain unconvinced by the (SCIENCE), though. They claim it is extremely (DOUBT) that something as small as a zip fastener could be reliably identified on such an old film. In (ADD), they say that the creature caught on camera does not move like a human and that it is, therefore (TRUE) a wild creature of nature. The debate goes on. 

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

According to the report, the driver of the car was a policeman. (BEING)

=> According to the report, the by a policeman.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

I don't know why Sarah left the party so suddenly. (MADE)

=> I don't know the party so suddenly.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

The company decided to advertise the job in a national newspaper. (PUT)

=> The company decided to the job in a national newspaper.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

John is interested in knowing more about astronomy. (LIKE)

=> John more about astronomy.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Maybe Peter forgot that we changed the time of the meeting. (MIGHT)

=> Peter that we changed the time of the meeting.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Paul is the only person who has replied to the invitation. (NOBODY)

=> Apart replied to the invitation.

You are going to read an article about a man who makes works of art out of seashells. Choose the answer which you think fits best according to the text.

THE SHELL ARTIST 

At the age of 83 Peter Cooke has become a master of his art.

There are still many things that Peter Cooke would like to try his hand at - paper-making and feather-work are on his list. For the moment though, he will stick to the skill that he has delighted to perfect over the past ten years: making delicate and unusual objects out of shells.

"Tell me if I am boring you" he says, as he leads me round his apartment showing me his work. There is a fine line between being a bore and being an enthusiast but Cooke need not worry; he fits into the latter category, helped both by his and by the beauty of the things he makes.

He points to a pair of shell-covered ornaments above a fireplace. 'I shan't be at all bothered if people don't buy them because I have got so used to them, and to me, they're adorable. I never meant to sell my work commercially. Some friends came to see me about five years ago and said, "You must have an exhibition -people ought to see these. We'll talk to a man who owns an art gallery".' The result was an exhibition in London, at which 70 per cent of the objects were sold. His second exhibition opened at the gallery yesterday. Considering the enormous prices the pieces command - around $2,000 for the ornaments - an empty space above the fireplace would seem a small sacrifice for Cooke to make.

There are 86 pieces in the exhibition, with prices starting at $225 for a shell-flower in a crystal vase. Cooke insists that he has nothing to do with the prices and is cheerily open about their level: he claims there is nobody else in the world who produces work like his, and, as the gallery-owner told him, 'Well, you're going to stop one day and everybody will want your pieces because there won't be anymore.'

'I do wish, though,' says Cooke, 'that I'd taken this up a lot earlier, because then I would have been able to produce really wonderful things - at least the potential would have been there. Although the ideas are still there and I'm doing the best I can now, I'm more limited physically than I was when I started.' Still, the work that he has managed to produce is a long way from the common shell constructions that can be found in seaside shops. 'I have a miniature mind,' he says, and this has resulted in boxes covered in thousands of tiny shells, little shaded pictures made from shells and baskets of astonishingly realistic flowers.

Cooke has created his own method and uses materials as and when he finds them. He uses the cardboard sent back with laundered shirts for his flower bases, a nameless glue bought in bulk from a sail-maker ('If it runs out, I don't know what I will do!') and washing-up liquid to wash the shells. 'I have an idea of what I want to do, and it just does itself,' he says of his working method, yet the attention to detail, color gradations and symmetry he achieves look far from accidental.

Cooke's quest for beautiful, and especially tiny, shells has taken him further than his Norfolk shore: to France, Thailand, Mexico, South Africa and the Philippines, to name but a few of the beaches where he has lain on his stomach and looked for beauties to bring home. He is insistent that he only collects dead shells and defends himself against people who write him letters accusing him of stripping the world's beaches. 'When I am collecting shells, I hear people's great fat feet crunching them up far faster than I can collect them; and the ones that are left, the sea breaks up. I would not dream of collecting shells with living creatures in them or diving for them, but once their occupants have left, why should I not collect them?' If one bases this argument on the amount of luggage that can be carried home by one man, the sum beauty of whose work is often greater than its natural parts, it becomes very convincing indeed.

What does the reader learn about Peter Cooke in the first paragraph?

  • He has produced hand-made objects in different materials.
  • He was praised for his she objects many years ago.
  • He hopes to work with other materials in the future.
  • He has written about his love of making shell objects.

When looking round his apartment, the writer _____

  • is attracted by Cooke's personality.
  • senses that Cooke wants his products to be admired.
  • realises he finds Cooke's work boring.
  • feels uncertain about giving Cooke his opinion.

The 'small sacrifice' refers to _____

  • the loss of Cooke's ornaments.
  • the display of Cooke's ornaments.
  • the cost of keeping Cooke's ornaments.
  • the space required to store Cooke's ornaments.

What does Cooke regret about his work?

  • He is not as famous as he should have been.
  • He makes less money than he should make.
  • He is less imaginative than he used to be.
  • He is not as skilful as he used to be.

When talking about the artist's working method, the writer suspects that Cooke _____

  • accepts that he sometimes makes mistakes.
  • is unaware of the unique quality his work has.
  • underrates his creative contribution.
  • undervalues the materials that he uses.

What does the reader learn about Cooke's shell-collecting activities?

  • Other methods might make his work easier.
  • Not everyone approves of what he does.
  • Other tourists get in the way of his collecting.
  • Not all shells are the right size and shape for his work.

You are going to read an article about a bird called the kingfisher. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. This is why a kingfisher may appear to change from bright blue to rich emerald green with only a slight change in the angle at which light falls on it.

B. But his interest in this, the world's most widespread kingfisher and the only member of its cosmopolitan family to bleed in Europe, was getting noticed.

C. A sure sign of his depth of feeling for this little bird is his inability to identify just what it is that draws him to it.

D. The movement sends a highly visible signal to rivals, both males and females as it defends its stretch of water against neighbors.

E. The bird came back within minutes and sat only a metre away.

F. The photographs succeed in communicating something of his feelings.

G. 'No speech, just beautiful images which say it all,' he says. 

The kingfisher

Wildlife photographer Charlie James is an expert on the kingfisher: beautiful blue-green bird that lives near streams and rivers, feeding on fish. 

Old trees overhang the stream, half shading shallow water. Soft greens, mud browns and the many different yellows of sunlight are the main colors, as soft as the sounds of water in the breeze. The bird cuts like a laser through the scene, straight and fast, a slice of light and motion so striking you almost feel it. It has gone in a split second, but a trace of the image lingers, its power out or proportion to its size.

Charlie James fell in love with kingfishers at an early age. After all, it is the stuff of legend. Greek myth makes the kingfisher a moon goddess who turned into a bird- Another tale tells how the kingfisher flew so high that its upper body took on the blue of the sky. while its underparts were scorched by the sun.

There is some scientific truth in that story. For despite the many different blues that appear in their coats, kingfishers have no blue pigment at all in their feathers. Rather, the structure of their upper feathers scatters light and strongly reflects blue.

It's small wonder that some wildlife photographers get so enthusiastic about them. Couple the colors with the fact that kingfishers, though shy of direct human approach, can be easy to watch from a hideout, and you have a recipe for a lifelong passion.

Charlie James's first hideout was an old blanket which he put over his head while he waited near a kingfisher's favorite spot. But it took another four years, he reckons, before he got his first decent picture. In the meantime, the European kingfisher had begun to dominate his life. He spent all the time he could by a kingfisher-rich woodland stream.

The trouble was school cut the time available to be with the birds. So he missed lessons. becoming what he describes as an 'academic failure'.

At 16, he was hired as an advisor for a nature magazine. Work as an assistant to the editor followed, then a gradual move to lite as a freelance wildlife film cameraman. What he'd really like to do now is make the ultimate kingfisher film. 'I'm attracted to the simple approach. I like to photograph parts of kingfisher wings ...'

The sentence trails off to nothing. He's thinking or those colors of the bird he's spent more than half his life getting close to, yet which still excites interest. But, as Charlie knows, there's so much more to his relationship with the kingfisher than his work can ever show.

You are going to read an article about four sportsmen. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

A. Darius (runner)
I've always been sporty, I played a bit of everything at one time, but I was best at football and athletics. When I was 14, I had a trial for d professional football club, but eventually opted to go down the athletics route instead. My biggest moment came when I got to compete for my country in the youth team and got a medal. It didn't result in much media attention, though, which was a shame. I'd been hoping some sponsorship would come out of it, because the training doesn't come cheap. I train at home all winter and then go away for three weeks, usually Florida, before the season starts. It's good fun there are great athletics facilities there and the nightlife's great too. You've got to be really disciplined, though. If friends ask me to go out the night before training. I have to say no. I wish I didn't, but dedication pays in this sport. The main goal for me is to get to the next Olympics - that would be fantastic. 

B. Gabriel (surfer)
The surfing community is small, so you get to meet the same guys wherever you compete. Professional surfers are very serious and often the best waves are at dawn, so if you're really going to get anywhere, you have to cut out late-night parties altogether. I don't mind that so much, but I do love having a lie-in, and I usually have to give that up too. But it's worth it because without that kind of dedication I might not have won the National Championships last year. I make sure that a big night out follows any win, though, and if there's cash involved in the winnings, I'll go away somewhere really nice. And, of course, the sacrifices are worth it in the long run because winning that championship meant I got picked to present a surfing series on TV. I guess I'm a bit of a celebrity now.

C. Dieter (yacht racer)
With five lads on a boat together, you have a good laugh. We're very traditional and we always celebrate a win in great style. It's been said that we act a bit childishly when we're out, but we don't actively go looking for media coverage. Sometimes the reporters actually seem more concerned about where you go out celebrating and what you get up to there than about where you came in the race. I'm away for eight months of the year, so it's great to get back, go out with my mates from other walks of life and do the things they do. You can't live, eat and breathe the sport all the time - it's not healthy. I'm known within the world of sailing, but fortunately I can count the number of times I've been recognized in the street on the fingers of one hand. I'd hate to become some sort of celebrity. I get a lot of nice letters from people wanting signed pictures, though. It may take ages but I reply to everyone. It would be cheeky to complain, even if it does take a bit of organizing.

D. Tomas (tennis player) 
It's always a great thing to walk on court and feel that the crowd's behind you. At the last tournament, though, it all got a bit crazy with people crowding around. Despite that, I have to admit that do still get quite a thrill out of being spotted by fans when I'm out shopping or something. It has its downside though. My last girlfriend didn't like it if I got too much attention from female fans. The thing is, tennis players have to travel quite a lot, and in the end that's why we split up, I guess. That was hard, but you've got to make sacrifices in any sport; you've got to be serious and professional. Actually, it doesn't really bother me too much. I'm content to concentrate on my game now and catch up on the other things in life once I've retired, because, after all, that comes pretty early in this sport.

Which sportsman mentions a time-consuming aspect of being well known in his sport?

  • Darius
  • Gabriel
  • Dieter
  • Tomas

Which sportsman mentions the financial rewards of success in his sport?

  • Darius
  • Gabriel
  • Dieter
  • Tomas

Which sportsman mentions a good result that went largely unnoticed?

  • Darius
  • Gabriel
  • Dieter
  • Tomas

Which sportsman mentions enjoying a change of scene when training?

  • Darius
  • Gabriel
  • Dieter
  • Tomas

Which sportsman mentions difficulties in a relationship resulting from his lifestyle?

  • Darius
  • Gabriel
  • Dieter
  • Tomas

Which sportsman mentions attracting attention for things not directly connected to the sport?

  • Darius
  • Gabriel
  • Dieter
  • Tomas

Which sportsman mentions not finding the idea of fame attractive?

  • Darius
  • Gabriel
  • Dieter
  • Tomas

Which sportsman mentions the advantages and disadvantages of supporters coming to watch the sport?

  • Darius
  • Gabriel
  • Dieter
  • Tomas

Which sportsman mentions the time of day he has to go training?

  • Darius
  • Gabriel
  • Dieter
  • Tomas

Which sportsman mentions a feeling that his sporting career will be relatively short?

  • Darius
  • Gabriel
  • Dieter
  • Tomas