FCE Test 11 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

6/11/2021 5:47:09 PM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

A DRAMATIC STORM

On 31st March I had my only experience of a fairly small natural disaster, when, within four hours, about 224 litres of water per square metre fell on the city of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, where I live.

The evening before we noticed some unusual cloud formations that looked as if they were carrying a huge volume of water. It didn't rain during the night but in the morning we noticed that the air was hot and humid. At around midday it began to but this quickly developed into quite a downpour. It didn't stop. The rain continued to pour down until about five o'clock when there was a brief pause. We didn't go outside as we were too busy all the water that had come in through small cracks in the roof. The people who did, soon discovered that they were mistaken if they thought the storm had . Instead, there was thunder and lightning and more torrential rain. Cars were swept away, houses flooded and seven people their lives.

After the storm, many people spent days without either electricity or water and others were in temporary shelters until the roads could be of the mud and fallen trees. It seems strange that in a place where there is a volcano that could erupt and where there are occasional earth tremors, the first real natural disaster I experienced was a flood!

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

FUNCTIONAL FOODS

In the 21st-century, food will do more than just feed you. A new range of products appearing shelves in shops and supermarkets designed to give you specific health benefits. The demands of modern life make these foods very attractive. only do they provide proven ways to improve health, but they are also very attractive as a quick and convenient way of making sure we enjoy a healthy diet.

In some countries, it is already possible to buy crisps that make you feel depressed, chewing gum that increases your brain power and tea that helps you over the tiredness associated with long-distance air travel. In the future, experts promise biscuits that will keep your heart healthy, and a hot chocolate drink to give you strong bones.

the fact that these "functional" foods cannot replace a balanced diet and regular exercise, they can help the body perform at its best a lot of the time. At present, these foods are more expensive than other foods, but that is due to the ingredients they of and the way they are made. All the foods contain probiotics which increase the number of "good" bacteria in your stomach, helping to keep your digestive system healthy.

There may even a functional food to protect eyesight, so keep an eye out as you never know what you might be eating tomorrow!

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

FLORIDA

When the famous explorer, Columbus claimed Florida for Spain in 1492, he had never (LAY) eyes on it. The area's most important early (VISIT) thus set a pattern that has continued for centuries. There is a general belief amongst people, apparently quite (CONNECT) with whether or not they've been there themselves, that Florida is a good place to go.

In fact, it is almost (POSSIBLE) not to enjoy yourself in Florida today, given the wonderful (SELECT) of facilities available to tourists. Some of the world's most popular tourist attractions are located in the state whose (SAND) beaches welcome 40 million people each year. These days it seems (POINT) to describe Florida's geography and climate. After all, few people would have (DIFFICULT) in finding it on a map and most would know what weather to expect there.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

There are fewer people in the gym class than there were last week. (AS)

=> There people in the gym class as there were last week.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Simona last wrote to me seven months ago. (HEARD)

=> I Simona for seven months.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Jim fell off his bike because he wasn't looking where he was going. (PAYING)

=> If Jim to where he was going, he wouldn't have fallen off his bike. 

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

The manager failed to persuade Karen to take the job. (SUCCEED)

=> The manager Karen to take the job.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Your new car is very similar to my brother's. (LOT)

=> There is not your new car and my brother's.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

They received many letters of support after they had appeared on television. (FOLLOWING)

=> They received many letters of support on television.

You are going to read an article about Japanese specialty sushi. Choose the answer which you think fits best according to the text. 

When engineer Tsutomu Takada lost his job, he decided to make a complete change in his life. He took off his business suit and put on an apron - and started a course to become a chef. 'I had always dreamed of doing this, even when I was an engineer.' says Takada. 'And now, here I am.' he says with a laugh.

He is a student at Tokyo's Sushi University. This is the only university in Japan which is devoted entirely to teaching the art of sushi. What is sushi? It is Japan's famous dish of raw fish, dried seaweed and rice soaked in vinegar. Traditionally it takes decades of training to become a sushi chef, but Sushi University trains chefs in one year.

As well as providing quick retraining, the university's approach reflects a growing change in Japanese society — a move away from the traditional ways of doing things. 'Society has changed,' sighs university principal Katsuji Konakai, who started as a sushi apprentice more than sixty years ago. 'People today wouldn't put up with the tough training I had. When I made mistakes, my teacher hit me on the head with his knife handle!'

Sushi hasn't always been a matter of studying hard and being hit on the head. It started in ancient China, where people preserved fish by packing it in rice and salt. They did not eat the rice. It is said that this process probably came to Japan between 300 BC and AD 300. Adventurous Japanese cooks began to serve the pickled fish together with vinegared rice. This combination of rice and fish was called sushi.

The most important thing about sushi is that it has to look attractive. In fact, the most carefully prepared sushi meals can cost hundreds of dollars! There are 45,000 sushi businesses in Japan today, including take-away, as some people like to eat it for lunch in their offices. There are also cheap self-service restaurants, where customers sit at a counter which has different coloured plates with different types of sushi on them. These plates move around the counter on a conveyor belt, and customers choose the sushi they want to eat. When they have finished eating, the waitress counts the coloured plates and works out the bill.

Mr. Konakai has made sushi for Japan's emperor. He says sushi preparation is an art, but he also believes that Sushi University's intensive course is necessary. 'Of course, people complain this is not the way to do it,' he says, 'but we tried to make it easier for those who wanted to learn about sushi, and for those who want to take it overseas.' Many of the students already have jobs lined up in places like Australia, Italy and Singapore.

But the course is really just the beginning for the new chefs. According to Mr. Konakai, it takes five, ten or even twenty years to become a top-notch sushi chef. 'To make good sushi, you have to have skill but you also need a warm heart,' he says.

What made Tsutomu Takada start training as a sushi chef?

  • He wanted to fulfil an ambition.
  • He didn't want to work in an office.
  • He didn't know what else to do.
  • He thought he would make a lot of money.

Why is Sushi University so revolutionary?

  • It has unusual teaching methods.
  • You have to wait a long time to get into a course.
  • It only offers courses in sushi preparation.
  • You can only study there for a short time.

What does Katsuji Konakai say about the old training methods?

  • They are no longer acceptable.
  • They were too violent.
  • They were too traditional.
  • They were too quick.

Who was responsible for the invention of sushi?

  • People who caught the fish
  • The Chinese people
  • Japanese chefs who used the rice
  • People who wrote about the history of cooking

What is the main feature of contemporary sushi?

  • It is always expensive.
  • It is very popular.
  • It must look nice.
  • It is sold as a take-away.

What does Mr. Konakai think about Sushi University?

  • It provides courses that are needed.
  • The training is too intensive.
  • It stops students having to study abroad.
  • The methods used in teaching are not right.

You are going to read a magazine article about marathon running. Eight paragraphs have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A-H the one which fits each gap (15-20). There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. He argues that after 16-20 miles, you have to slow down, and running gets really hard.
B. After a quick top-up of water and a rest, most go home and make a full recovery.
C. When it comes to marathon running, however, the experts are divided.
D. In spite of this, marathon running is bad for your health.
E. But this weakening effect on the system is short-lived.
F. Within a couple of months, however, she was managing two or three miles.
G. This is because running halves your risk of getting heart disease.
H. She started by running to the shops, wearing an anorak and carrying her shopping bag.

MARATHON RUNNING - A RECIPE FOR HEALTH?

If ever there was living proof that marathon running keeps you fit, Jenny Wood Allen from Dundee is it. (0) H She was 71 and she did not even have proper training shoes then.

At first, she could only run to the end of her avenue, which is about three-quarters of a mile. She had problems getting back and had to either take a bus or ask somebody for a lift.

Scientifically speaking, human beings are perfectly tuned for jumping and running, walking long distances. One of them, Professor Craig Sharp says that if you are reasonably fit, you can probably run for two hours at a medium pace and feel OK. At this point, your muscles run out of glycogen - the best source of energy we have.

This means you start using fat for energy, and your body has to work harder to transform fat into energy. This happens at a time when you are starting to feel exhausted. All this is proof - he believes - that the body isn't designed for long-distance running.

Other specialists have a very different opinion. Dr. Percy Brown believes that if you train sensibly and prepare several months in advance, it could even help you live longer.

He believes the only problem you may have when running a marathon is exhaustion or a small injury caused by falling or tripping over things. Only 1 in 1,000 actually makes it to hospital.

Another problem may be post-race exhaustion. Surveys show most runners are much more likely to catch colds or develop chest infections in the week after running a race. There is no evidence of lasting disease or an increased risk of illness.

At 87, Jenny Wood Allen will be doing the London marathon for the 13th time this Sunday. And she plans to go on taking part for many years to come.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

You are going to read a magazine article in which four actors talk about their profession. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

AN ACTOR'S WORLD

A. Jake Armstrong
"l have a terrible problem reading through scripts," admits Jake Armstrong. "l find most of them very boring, although once in a while a script will really appeal to me and l am immediately attracted to the character the director has asked me to consider." Jake Armstrong was always going to end up doing something dramatic. His father and mother are both actors, and although neither of them pushed him into the profession, he feels his career path was inevitable as he saw so much theatre when he was a child. "l would wait backstage until it was time to go home at the end of an evening performance. I met the most fantastic people. As a child, you don't appreciate fame and l thought all these extraordinary people were really normal. But there was something fascinating about the whole business, why people dress up as different people and pretend to be other personalities. Unlike my parents, however, l am more interested in film work. The thing about filming is that you hang around for hours chatting away to people, then suddenly you've got to turn it on. l had to learn very quickly how to tone down for the camera, not to overact, whereas on stage in the theatre it's the exact opposite."

B. Laura Dyson
"I think I'm very lucky to have been noticed so early in my career. When l was at drama school I used to feel quite desperate meeting up with friends who had already graduated and who were out of work. I would listen to them talking about the temporary jobs they had, working in restaurants, supermarkets - whatever they could find, and going to one audition after the other. And they were only auditioning for really small parts in theatre or film and getting absolutely nowhere."
Laura Dyson is just 21 and already a box office name. She was spotted whilst on stage in London and offered a film role by one of Hollywood's leading directors. "lt was unbelievable. I'd had hardly any experience and the play l was in was a walk-on role only. l didn't have to say a single word! Apparently, the director was looking for someone who could play a 16-year-old schoolgirl, so I suppose I'm fortunate in that I don't look my age. The irony is that l used to spend hours making up my face so that I'd look older. l used to get so fed up with people refusing me entry to adult films because nobody believed me when I said l was over 18.

C. Emmy Mason
"My parents have always been interested in the arts and l remember being taken to the cinema and the theatre at a very early age. When I said l wanted to go to drama school they were horrified. In fact, my father refused to agree but he eventually gave in because l threatened to go off around the world on my own at 17 doing any old job just to pay my way."
Emmy Mason was determined to succeed and although it has not been an easy ride to stardom she has finally achieved the kind of recognition that most actors can only dream about. "My big break came quite by accident. I was an understudy at the National Theatre for months on end. lt was such hard work, learning the lines and yet knowing that you were unlikely ever to say them in front of an audience. Don't get me wrong, though. I was glad to be earning some money and at least l got to see the famous names each night. Anyway, one day the leading lady went down with flu and in the afternoon l was told l would be on stage that evening. There wasn't time to be frightened. I had sat through all the rehearsals so I knew the moves by heart. And that was it. The critics loved my performance and I've never been out of work since."

D. Luke Demain
"l guess I ended up acting by accident. l wanted to go to university but couldn't decide what to study. So I thought I'd take a year out, do different things and give myself a breathing space before applying. But during that year I got involved with a local theatre group and suddenly realized I was happier than I'd ever been."Luke Demain has never looked back. Unusual in this day and age, he didn't go to drama school and has had no formal training. lnstead he found himself an agent who was willing to put him forward for auditions. "To begin with l was mostly doing advertisements for TV and film, which was fine but not serious acting. Then one day my agent got a call from a film studio and the next day l was on the film set. There hadn't even been time to send me the script. Looking back l don't think l even asked what the film was about, it didn't matter. But I'm quite choosy now and turn down more scripts than l accept!"

Which of the actors has become successful at a young age?
  • Jake Armstrong
  • Laura Dyson
  • Emmy Mason
  • Luke Demain
Which of the actors was strongly influenced by their upbringing?
  • Jake Armstrong
  • Laura Dyson
  • Emmy Mason
  • Luke Demain

Which of the actors had little warning before going on stage?

  • Jake Armstrong
  • Laura Dyson
  • Emmy Mason
  • Luke Demain
Which of the actors accepted work without hesitation?
  • Jake Armstrong
  • Laura Dyson
  • Emmy Mason
  • Luke Demain
Which of the actors was picked without having spoken?
  • Jake Armstrong
  • Laura Dyson
  • Emmy Mason
  • Luke Demain
Which of the actors has not been professionally trained?
  • Jake Armstrong
  • Laura Dyson
  • Emmy Mason
  • Luke Demain
Which of the actors is not interested in reading scripts?
  • Jake Armstrong
  • Laura Dyson
  • Emmy Mason
  • Luke Demain
Which of the actors had a difficult time before becoming famous?
  • Jake Armstrong
  • Laura Dyson
  • Emmy Mason
  • Luke Demain
Which of the actors tried to change their appearance?
  • Jake Armstrong
  • Laura Dyson
  • Emmy Mason
  • Luke Demain
Which of the actors had to fight for parental support?
  • Jake Armstrong
  • Laura Dyson
  • Emmy Mason
  • Luke Demain