FCE Test 12 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

6/18/2021 6:18:40 PM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

EATING WELL

People today are probably more concerned about food than ever before. We worry about eating foods that too much fat or carbohydrates and so we cut on things like meat, bread, potatoes and dairy products. The problem with making dramatic changes to our eating like these is that we may also be cutting our good of iron or other vitamins and minerals. Suddenly we start feeling tired or irritable. 

The secret of a diet is to reduce foods that are in cholesterol, while, at the same time, eating those that are in calcium and iron like soy protein, sesame seeds, spinach and broccoli. Eating well does not mean that you should cut out all your favorite foods. It just means eating sensibly and trying to avoid too much food.

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

FIT FOR SPORTS

It's not always easy to decide which sport to take up. When choosing, it is important to remember that excellence in sports results a number of factors. For some sports, the body shape and structure with you are born are important. Top runners are typical examples of individuals who have selected a sport because of their natural body type. Many other sports are more dependent on training and technique, and anyone following a well-structured and appropriate training programme should do well.

The aim of all sports training to improve fitness and skills, and to develop training programmes that are both safe and effective. To do property, an understanding of the physical demands of sport is needed. All sports require a combination of strength, speed, endurance, agility and flexibility to varying degrees. What is important is how these elements are combined to build up the skills of the sport question. Other factors to be into account in a training programme are diet, the importance of avoiding injuries, your general state of health, and the nature and role of other team players.

Bearing these considerations in mind, anyone prepared to work it can expect to progress to a very reasonable competitive level, even only a few people will go on to break world records.

Fill in the blank with an appropriate form of one of the words given to make a meaningful passage.

GOING TO SCHOOL IN WEST AFRICA

Africa has more languages than any other continent. Although foreigners have been responsible for the introduction of some languages, there are hundreds of local languages.

It is important that (TEACH) for children begins in the local language to avoid unnecessary (CONFUSE) . In West Africa, despite (GOVERN) efforts, it is not always possible for every child to receive education and for many families, the fees for children to attend school are very (EXPENSE) . However, although a family will usually have to contribute towards the school fees, (PAY) can be put off until the harvest is finished.

The (RELATIVE) small number of Africans reaching university, therefore, find themselves in (POSSESS) of a great deal of power and influence, as they are always in a (MINOR) .

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

We bought a DVD player when Nicholas got his new job. (UNTIL)

=> We didn't Nicholas got his new job.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

I had no idea about Rona's engagement. (UNAWARE)

=> I engagement.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

I'd love to go on holiday in March, but that's my busiest month. (WISH)

=> I go on holiday in March, but that's my busiest month.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

There's no milk left, so can you buy some? (RUN)

=> We , so can you buy some?

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

I expect Lucy was pleased that she'd won the prize. (BEEN)

=> Lucy that she'd won the prize.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

I get very embarrassed when people find out that I used to be on television. (IT)

=> I think when people find out that I used to be on television.

You are going to read a magazine article in which a father describes his relationship with his son. Choose the answer which you think fits best according to the text.

Gary and Me

The restaurant owner John Moore writes about his relationship with his son Gary, the famous TV chef. 

I believe everyone's given a chance in life. My son, Gary, was given his chance with cooking, and my chance was to run a restaurant. When I heard about the opportunity. I rushed over to look at the place. It was in a really bad state. It was perfect for what I had in mind. 

Coming into this business made me recall my childhood. I can remember my mother going out to work in a factory and me being so upset because I was left alone. With that in mind, I thought, 'We want time for family life.' My wife dedicated herself to looking after the children and did all my accounts, while I ran the business. We lived over the restaurant in those days, and we always put a lot of emphasis on having meals together. It's paid dividends with our children, Gary and Joe. They're both very confident. Also, from a very early age they would come down and talk to our regular customers. It's given both of them a great start in life. 

Gary was quite a lively child when he was really small. We had a corner bath, and when he was about seven he thought he'd jump into it like a swimming pool, and he knocked himself out. When he was older he had to work for pocket money. He started off doing odd jobs and by the age of about ten he was in the kitchen every weekend, so he always had loads of money at school. He had discipline. He used to be up even before me in the morning. If you run a family business, it's for the family, and it was nice to see him helping out. 

Gary wasn't very academic, but he shone so much in the kitchen. By the age of 15 he was as good as any of the men working there, and sometimes he was even left in charge. He would produce over a hundred meals, and from then I knew he'd go into catering because he had that flair. So when he came to me and said, 'Dad, I've got to do work experience as part of my course at school,' I sent him to a friend of mine who's got a restaurant.

Gary recently took up playing the drums and now he has his own band. Goodness knows what will happen to the cooking if the music takes off. My advice to Gary would be: if you start chasing two hares, you end up catching neither, so chase the hare you know you're going to catch. He understood when I said to him: 'Gary, if you're going to get anywhere in life, you've got to do it by the age of 30. If you haven't done it by then, it's too late.'

Gary went to catering college at the age of 17, and on his first day he and the other new students - they're normally complete beginners - were given what's supposed to be a morning's work. But within an hour Gary had chopped all his vegetables, sliced all his meats. He'd prepared everything. That's my son for you! In the end, he was helping other people out.

None of us can believe how successful Gary's TV cookery series has become. I'm extremely proud of him. I've always tried to tell him that if you want something, you've got to work jolly hard for it because no one gives you anything. He's seen the opportunity he's been given and grabbed hold of it with both hands. You know, you talk to your children as they grow up, and if they only take in ten percent of what you've told them, you've got to be happy with that. The things Gary says, the things he does, I think, well, he must have listened sometimes.

How did the writer's childhood influence his own family life?

  • He realised that the pattern was repeating itself.
  • He encouraged his children to talk to him.
  • He made sure there was plenty of personal contact.
  • He asked his wife to stay at home.

What does the writer mean by 'paid dividends'?

  • brought financial reward
  • produced benefits
  • was worth the suffering
  • allowed money to be saved

As a young boy, Gary _____

  • showed how determined he could be.
  • was always in trouble.
  • was motivated by money.
  • demonstrated a variety of talents.

What is Gary's father's attitude to Gary playing in a band?

  • Pleased that he has a hobby he enjoys
  • Interested in how he can introduce music into the restaurant
  • Concerned that music may interfere with his career
  • Doubtful whether he will have time to improve his technique

According to his father, what was typical about Gary's behaviour on his first day at college?

  • He helped other people.
  • He impressed those in charge.
  • He tried to make his father proud.
  • He performed the task efficiently.

How does his father regard Gary's upbringing?

  • His encouragement has caused Garyis success.
  • The family influence on Gary was too strong.
  • Gary has forgotten important lessons.
  • Gary has learnt some essential things.

You are going to read a magazine interview with a sportswoman. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. But the Championships are different because there's only one chance and you have to be ready to make the most of it. 

B. In fact, some of them help me with my speed and ball-skills training. 

C. But once the final whistle blows, you become a different person. 

D. So I took the decision some time ago that this competition would be the end of it as far as playing is concerned.

E. I'm on a strict timetable to gain maximum fitness for them. 

F. As far as Jim's aware, we have always beaten them, but they'll be exciting to play.

G. As captain, I think it's important that I have a strong mental attitude and lead by example.

The Netball Captain 

In our series on women in sport, Suzie Ellis went to meet England's netball captain. 

Kendra Slawinski is captain of England's netball team. When I met her, she'd had a typical day for the weeks leading up to next month's World Championships: a day's teaching at a local school followed by a training session in the local supermarket car park.

I was surprised to hear about her training venue.

'Don't you get strange looks?' I asked her. 'I'm too involved in what I'm doing - concentrating on my movements and my feet - to see anything else,' she said. 'l might notice cars slow down out of the corner of my eye, but that's all.' 

'My whole life now is all about making sure I'm at my absolute best for the Championships,' says Kendra.

'' These are her fourth World Championships and they are guaranteed to be the biggest ever, with 27 nations taking part. 

'We'll have home support behind us, which is so special,' she says, 'And it's important that the reputation of netball in this country should be improved. As a result of playing here, there will be more pressure than we're used to. A home crowd will have expectations and give more support. People will expect us to start the tournament with a good game.'

Their first game is against Barbados and it comes immediately after the opening ceremony. ' They have lots of ability.'

The England team are currently ranked fourth in the world. But, as Kendra points out, the World Championships will be tough. 'You have to push yourself to play each day, there's no rest between games as in a series. And you can still win an international series if you Iose the first game. '

In the fifteen years since she has been playing at top level, the sport has become harder, faster. On court, players are more aggressive. 'You don't do all that training not to come out a winner,' says Kendra.

' We're all friendlier after the game.'

Netball is also taking a far more scientific approach to fitness testing.

'It is essential that we all think and train like world-class players,' says Kendra. 

' I see my role as supporting and encouraging the rest of the team.'

'From the very beginning, my netball career has always been carefully planned,' she says. ''

Doubtless she will coach young players in the future, but at the moment her eyes are firmly set on her last big event. As she leads out her team in the opening candlelight ceremony, she is more than likely to have a tear in her eye. Her loyal supporters will be behind her every step or the way.

You are going to read an article about people who changed their jobs. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

A NEW LIFE

A. The Farmer
Matt Froggatt used to be an insurance agent in the City of London but now runs a sheep farm. 
'After 14 years in business, I found that the City had gone from a place which was exciting to work into a grind - no one was having fun anymore. But I hadn't planned to leave for another five or ten years when I was made redundant. It came out of the blue. I didn't get a particularly good pay-off but it was enough to set up the farm with. My break came when I got to know the head chef of a local hotel with one of the top 20 hotel restaurants in the country. Through supplying them, my reputation spread and now I also supply meat through mail order. I'm glad I'm no longer stuck in the office but it's astonishing how little things have changed for me: the same 80- to 90-hour week and still selling a product.

B. The Painter
Ron Ablewhite was a manager in advertising but now makes a living as an artist.
'My painting began as a hobby but I realised I was getting far more excitement out of it than out of working. The decision to take redundancy and to become an artist seemed logical. The career counsellor I talked to was very helpful. I think I was the first person who had ever told him, "l don't want to go back to where I've been." He was astonished because the majority of people in their mid-forties need to get back to work immediately - they need the money. But we had married young and our children didn't need our support. It was a leap into the unknown. We went to the north of England, where we didn't know a soul. It meant leaving all our friends, but we've been lucky in that our friendships have survived the distance plenty of them come up and visit us now.' 

C. The Hatmaker
After working for five years as a company lawyer, Katherine Goodison set up her own business in her London flat, making hats for private clients. 
'My job as a lawyer was fun. It was stimulating and I earned a lot of money, but the hours were terrible. I realised I didn't want to become a senior partner in the company, working more and more hours, so I left. A lot of people said I'd get bored, but that has never happened. The secret is to have deadlines. Since it's a fashion-related business, you have the collections, next year's shapes, the season - there's always too much to do, so you have to run a very regimented diary. I feel happier now, and definitely less stressed. There are things I really long for, though, like the social interaction with colleagues. What I love about this job is that I'm totally responsible for the product. If I do a rubbish job, then I'm the one who takes the blame. Of course, you care when you're working for a company, but when your name is all over the promotional material, you care that little bit more.'

D. The Masseur
Paul Drinkwater worked in finance for 16 years before becoming a masseur at the Life Centre in London.
'l had been in financial markets from the age of 22, setting up deals. I liked the adrenaline but I never found the work rewarding. I was nearly made redundant in 1989, but I escaped by resigning and travelling for a year. I spent that year trying to work out what I wanted to do. I was interested in health, so I visited some of the world's best gymnasiums and talked to the owners about how they started up. I knew that to change career I had to get qualifications so I did various courses in massage. Then I was offered part-time work at the Life Centre. I have no regrets. I never used to feel in control, but now I have peace of mind and control of my destiny. That's best of all.'

Which person mentions enjoying their pastime more than the job they used to do?

  • The Farmer
  • The Painter
  • The Hatmaker
  • The Masseur

Which person mentions enjoying being in charge of their own life?

  • The Farmer
  • The Painter
  • The Hatmaker
  • The Masseur

Which person mentions being surprised by suddenly losing their previous job?

  • The Farmer
  • The Painter
  • The Hatmaker
  • The Masseur

Which person mentions not having other people depending on them financially?

  • The Farmer
  • The Painter
  • The Hatmaker
  • The Masseur

Which person mentions missing working with other people?

  • The Farmer
  • The Painter
  • The Hatmaker
  • The Masseur

Which person mentions undergoing training in order to take up their new job?

  • The Farmer
  • The Painter
  • The Hatmaker
  • The Masseur

Which person mentions a contact being useful in promoting their new business?

  • The Farmer
  • The Painter
  • The Hatmaker
  • The Masseur

Which person mentions disliking the amount of time they used to have to work?

  • The Farmer
  • The Painter
  • The Hatmaker
  • The Masseur

Which person mentions the similarities between their new job and their old one?

  • The Farmer
  • The Painter
  • The Hatmaker
  • The Masseur

Which person mentions needing time to choose a new career?

  • The Farmer
  • The Painter
  • The Hatmaker
  • The Masseur