FCE Test 13 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

7/12/2021 10:19:12 AM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

THE PATHÉ FILM COMPANY

In 1885, a Frenchman, Charles Pathé, created what later became France’s most successful film studios. By 1907, the company had expanded enormously and had studios in France, Britain, Germany, Italy, Spain and the USA. What seems surprising now that Hollywood dominates the film world is that a French company itself so well in the USA. Pathé was one of the main film companies there at that time, hiring out its studios to other film-making companies distributing its own films.

However, Pathé was big in the USA, it was a giant in Europe. In 1913, the year before the First World War broke out, Pathé made no fewer than three hundred films. But the war affected the company badly. Shortages of staff and equipment led to big in production, and by 1918 output had to sixty-three films. From then on, Pathé concentrated on making fewer films of greater length and better quality.

Pathé was the first company to put out regular news films, which it started doing in 1903. Each film lasted fifteen minutes and of six news items. From on, Pathé’s news department had branches all over Europe and later all over the world. By the 1970S, TV news had completely the role of cinema news films and so the company stopped making them. Today, Pathé is chiefly involved in TV, cinema and new video technology.

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS

Franklin Roberts was a commercial airline pilot with more than 21,000 hours of flying time behind him. However, in of his great experience, he could not explain something happened to him in the summer of 1981. As he was flying over Lake Michigan, an object appeared in the sky which took him completely surprise. Whatever it was, it raced through the sky ahead of his plane and then turned across his path, before finally disappearing the distance.

This is the kind of incident that fascinates Richard Haines, a psychologist who works at a research institute in California, and investigates reports like these a hobby. Over the last twelve years, he has collected thousands of reports on UFOs seen by plane crews. He has concentrated on the stories told to him by pilots, he believes they are more likely to be accurate. Pilots are trained in observation and make reliable witnesses. They would generally know what they were looking at it were something familiar. Critics of Haines’s work say that there is, in fact, special about pilots. They claim that pilots are as capable of making mistakes as anybody else. However, none of this has stopped Haines, who continues to investigate UFO reports with enthusiasm. 

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

Float your troubles away

Nowadays, anyone who is trying to ease pain or reduce their level of anxiety can try a treatment which is known as flotation therapy. Experts have claimed that this can (RELIEF) a significant number of medical conditions. The patient is asked to lie (MOTION) in a large tank, which is filled with warm, salty water. When the patient is in the water, it is so (PEACE) that he or she becomes extremely relaxed.

As well as being of (PRACTICE) value in dealing with the patient's mental state, flotation is said to lead to a reduction in high blood (PRESS) and to ease long-term physical pain. Even people whose level of (FIT) is said to be good are certain to find that it is worth taking the time to float. Studies have shown that the therapy can be of considerable (ASSIST) in giving up smoking, losing weight and finding effective (SOLVE) to difficult problems. All of this is achieved by the simple method of freeing the patient's brain from the many unpleasant aspects of everyday life. In future years, this may become a standard method of dealing with stress-related problems.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

She sometimes wishes she had never left Australia. (REGRETS)

=> She sometimes Australia.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Mark did as I suggested and bought a new computer. (ADVICE)

=> Mark and bought a new computer.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Guests are asked to say if they prefer tea or coffee with their breakfast. (RATHER)

=> Guests are asked to say if tea or coffee with their breakfast.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

No teacher will tolerate bad behavior in class. (PUT)

=> No teacher will bad behavior in class.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

I've worn my hair like this for as long as I can remember. (STARTED)

=> I can't remember wearing my hair like this.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

The old house will need a thorough redecoration before you can live in it. (HAVE)

=> The old house redecorated before you can live in it.

You are going to read a text about a group of women who went on an expedition in the Arctic circle. Choose the answer which you think fits best according to the text.

POLAR PURPOSE

In 1997, a group of twenty British women made history. Working in five teams with four women in each team, they walked to the North Pole. Apart from one experienced female guide, the other women were all ordinary people who had never done anything like this in their lives before. They managed to survive in an environment which had defeated several very experienced men during the same few spring months of that year. Who were these women and how did they succeed where others failed?

In the summer of 1995, an advertisement was put in several British newspapers: 'Adventurers are being sought for the formation of an all-woman team to walk to the North Pole. Applications are invited from women of any age, background and occupation who are willing to put up with real pain and discomfort to achieve an important goal.'

Nearly one hundred women took part in the first selection weekend and then, after several training expeditions designed to weed out unsuitable applicants, twenty women were chosen. The youngest of these was twenty-one and the oldest fifty-one. In the group, there was a mother of triplets, a teacher, a flight attendant, a policewoman and even a film producer.

They were a very mixed bunch but they all really wanted to take part in the venture and make it a success. Each of the women agreed to raise the £2500 needed for expenses and the airfare to Canada, where the expedition began. They also committed themselves to following an intensive physical training programme before leaving the UK so that they were fit enough to take part in the expedition without endangering their own or others' lives.

The women set off as soon as they were ready. Once on the ice, each woman had to ski along while dragging a sledge weighing over 50 kilos. This would not have been too bad on a smooth surface, but for long stretches, the Arctic ice is pushed up into huge mounds two or three metres high and the sledges had to be hauled up one side and carefully let down the other so that they didn't smash. The temperature was always below freezing point, and sometimes strong winds made walking while pulling so much weight almost impossible. It was also very difficult to put up their tents when they stopped each night.

In such conditions, the women were making good progress if they covered fourteen or fifteen kilometres a day. But there was another problem. Part of the journey was across a frozen sea with moving water underneath the ice and at some points, the team would drift back more than five kilometres during the night. That meant that after walking in these very harsh conditions for ten hours on one day, they had to spend part of the next day covering the same ground again. Furthermore, each day it would take three hours from waking up to setting off and another three hours every evening to set up the camp and prepare the evening meal.

So, how did they manage to succeed? They realised that they were part of a team. If any one of them didn't pull her sledge or get her job done, she would be jeopardising the success of the whole expedition. Any form of selfishness could result in the efforts of everyone else being completely wasted, so personal feelings had to be put to one side. At the end of their journey, the women agreed that it was mental effort far more than physical fitness that got them to the North Pole.

What was so extraordinary about the expedition?

  • There was no one to lead it.
  • The women did not have any men with them.
  • It was a new experience for most of the women.
  • The women had not met one another before.

Why were the women who took part in the expedition chosen?

  • They were the only ones who answered the advertisement.
  • They had done a weekend training course.
  • They were still in the group after others had been eliminated.
  • They came from very diverse backgrounds.

What did each woman have to do before the start of the expedition?

  • Visit Canada
  • Get fit
  • Learn to ski
  • Meet the other women

On the expedition, the women had to be careful to avoid ______.

  • falling over on the ice
  • being left behind
  • damaging the sledges
  • getting too cold at night

It was difficult for the women to cover 15 kilometres a day because _____.

  • they got too tired
  • the ice was moving
  • they kept getting lost
  • the temperatures were too low

What is the main message of the text?

  • Motivation and teamwork achieve goals.
  • Women can do anything they want.
  • It is sometimes good to experience difficult conditions.
  • Arctic conditions are very harsh.

You are going to read an article about a cookery course for children. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. This is followed by a session on 'knife skills', which will be important later on. 

B. She always uses top-quality ingredients, such as the best cuts of meat and the finest cheeses, so there's clearly no profit motive in this operation.

C. As they wander round, they argue lightheartedly about who has had the most experience in the kitchen. 

D. In the garden, they learn about the herbs that they will use in their cooking.

E. Their obvious tiredness may explain why one of them goes about the task so carelessly that the ingredients end up on the floor.

F. This is particularly true of young boys, who are happy to do anything that will end in a meal.

G. This contrast will become something of a theme during the course.

The little chefs

Hilary Rose travels to Dorset, in the south of England, to investigate a cookery course for children. 

There must be something in the air in Dorset, because the last place you'd expect to find children during the summer holidays is in the kitchen. Yet in a farmhouse, deep in the English countryside, that's exactly where they are — on a cookery course designed especially for children.

It's all the idea of Anna Wilson, who wants to educate young children about cooking and eating in a healthy way. 'I'm very keen to plant the idea in their heads that food doesn't grow on supermarket shelves,' she explains. 'The course is all about making food fun and enjoyable.' She thinks that eight is the perfect age to start teaching children to cook, because at that age they are always hungry.

These children are certainly all smiles as they arrive at the country farmhouse. Three girls and four boys aged from ten to thirteen make up the group. They are immediately given a tour of what will be 'home' for the next 48 hours. But one thing is quite clear — they all have a genuine interest in food and learning how to cook.

Anna has worked as a chef in all sorts of situations and has even cooked for the crew of a racing yacht, in limited space and difficult weather conditions. As a result, she has a very relaxed attitude to cooking, constantly encouraging the children and never talking down to them. 'Kids are easy to teach,' she insists, 'because they're naturally curious and if you treat them like adults, they listen to you.'

Back in the kitchen, Anna is giving the introductory talk, including advice on keeping hands clean, and being careful around hot ovens. Judging by the eager looks on their young faces as they watch Anna's demonstration, they are just keen to start cooking. 

The children learn the simplest way, by watching and then doing it themselves. They gather round as Anna chops an onion for the first evening meal. Then the boys compete with each other to chop their onions as fast as possible, while the girls work carefully, concentrating on being neat. When they learn to make bread, the girls knead the dough with their hands competently, while the boys punch it into the board, cheerfully hitting the table with their fists.

The following morning, four boys with dark shadows under their eyes stumble into the kitchen at 8.30 a.m. to learn how to make breakfast (sausages and eggs, and fruit drinks made with yoghurt and honey). We learn later that they didn't stop talking until 4.30 a.m. Ignoring this, Anna brightly continues trying to persuade everyone that fruit drinks are just as interesting as sausages and eggs. 

Anna has great plans for the courses and is reluctant to lower her standards in any way, even though her students are so young. 'And I like to keep the course fees down,' Anna adds, 'because if the children enjoy it and go on to teach their own children to cook, I feel it's worth it.' If this course doesn't inspire them to cook, nothing will.

You are going to read a magazine article in which four different women talk about the importance of their own personal space. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

MY OWN PERSONAL SPACE

A. Katrin
l always need to get away from other people at some point during the day. It's not that I don't get on with others, I've loads of friends. But I work in a really busy office in the center of town and from the moment I leave home each morning, it's non-stop. Crowds on the buses, busy streets, office bustle, phones, e-mail, do this, do that ... By the time the end of the day comes, I'm desperate for some peace and quiet. Even if I'm going out later in the evening, I always make sure I have at least an hour to myself without anyone being able to disturb me. I arrive home, make myself a drink, and Iie on the sofa. l close my eyes and relax by concentrating on each part of my body in turn, beginning with my neck. Even if I'm away from home, I try to find the time just to be alone in order to unwind and recharge my batteries. If I don't make this space for myself, I feel really tense and irritable.

B. Lia
I share a student flat with three others, so there's never a quiet moment. When I come back from college in the evenings, it's quite likely that there'll be other people there as well and we'll all have supper together. It's great fun but towards the end of the evening l feel really tired and so I like to disappear by myself for a while. It's hopeless to try and find any privacy in the flat, so l go out for a walk. Whatever the weather, I walk through the park which is quite close. Late at night, it's usually empty. There are just shadows and the rustle of animals and birds. It's very peaceful and it gives me the opportunity to reflect on the day and to think about what I have to do the next day. When l get back to the flat I like to go straight to bed. Usually, I fall asleep pretty quickly, even if the others are still up and chatting or listening to music. If I don't get this time to myself, I'll be like a bear with a sore head the next morning and not nice to know!

C. Beatriz
I'm a night owl and l absolutely hate getting up in the mornings. If people try and talk to me before midday, I really snap at them. Being an actress means that I work late so it's important that I create space for myself at the beginning of each day. And because l use my voice so much, in fact totally depend on it, l like to rest my voice and just listen to music when I wake up. I don't even want to hear other people's voices. Some people find this very hard to understand and get quite cross when I tell them not to contact me before noon. I tell them it's nothing personal but they still sound offended. I'm sure it must be the same for singers and, who knows, maybe teachers and lecturers get fed up with hearing the sound of their own voice and simply long to be by themselves somewhere, in complete silence.

D. Natalie
I work in a call center, which means I'm constantly on the phone. Apart from lunch and two short breaks during the day, I'm speaking to people all day long. And of course, you never get to see who you're speaking to! By the end of my shift, I'm exhausted, not because I'm rushing around or I'm on my feet all day but simply because I've spent the day talking and listening. The breaks are so short that there's no time to do anything other than get a drink and something to eat. I'd love to be able to go for a walk but there's nowhere to escape to within easy walking distance. The building where I work is in the middle of an industrial estate, you can't even see a single tree. So my flat is full of houseplants and when I get home it's wonderful to be able to relax, surrounded by all the greenery. I lie on the floor, stretch out, look up at the plants and try to imagine I'm in a tropical rainforest miles away!

Which of the women would like to take exercise during the day?
  • Katrin
  • Lia
  • Beatriz
  • Natalie
Which of the women worries she might upset other people?
  • Katrin
  • Lia
  • Beatriz
  • Natalie
Which of the women escapes outside to find peace and quiet?
  • Katrin
  • Lia
  • Beatriz
  • Natalie
Which of the women likes to prepare mentally for what is to come?
  • Katrin
  • Lia
  • Beatriz
  • Natalie
Which of the women thinks other people may feel equally stressed?
  • Katrin
  • Lia
  • Beatriz
  • Natalie
Which of the women relies entirely on her home environment for space?
  • Katrin
  • Lia
  • Beatriz
  • Natalie
Which of the women feels pressurized by too many demands at work?
  • Katrin
  • Lia
  • Beatriz
  • Natalie
Which of the women relies on personal space early in the day?
  • Katrin
  • Lia
  • Beatriz
  • Natalie
Which of the women creates space for herself even if she is not at home?
  • Katrin
  • Lia
  • Beatriz
  • Natalie
Which of the women has no time to relax during her working day?
  • Katrin
  • Lia
  • Beatriz
  • Natalie