FCE Test 15 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

8/10/2021 4:39:40 PM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

TREES FOR LIFE

Trees are amongst the biggest and longest-living things on Earth, some dating back longer than the oldest buildings. But being nice to look at, trees also play an important role in improving the quality of our lives.

On a worldwide , forests help to slow down the effects of global warming by using up the gas known as carbon dioxide and giving the oxygen we need to breathe. At local neighborhood level, trees also bring important environmental benefits. They offer shade and shelter, which in reduces the amount of energy needed to heat and cool nearby buildings; at the same time, they also remove other impurities from the air we breathe.

Urban trees are especially important because for many people they provide the only daily contact with the natural world. What's , urban trees also provide a home for birds, small animals, and butterflies. Without the trees, we would lose the pleasure of seeing these creatures in our cities. Regrettably, however, trees in cities are now coming under . There is a limit to the level of pollution they can and, down at street level, their roots are being seriously by the digging needed to make way for modern telephone, television, and other cables.

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only one word in each gap. 

MOVIE MONSTERS

Two films that came out in 1931, Dracula and Frankenstein, have changed cinema history. There have hundreds of remakes of these stories.

Frankenstein's monster and Count Dracula both originally characters in novels. It is a strange coincidence that first written versions of these stories were probably created in the same place and at the same time. Nearly 200 years ago, in the summer of 1816, the English writer, Mary Shelley, spent a holiday in Italy a group of friends including a man called Doctor Polidori. One night, all played a party game in which everyone to think of a horror story. The story Mary told was about Frankenstein and Polidori's was called Vampire.

the last 200 years, these stories have been told over and over again and the characters themselves have changed a lot. Two recent film versions of the stories were Interview with a Vampire, starring Tom Cruise, and Mary Shelly's Frankenstein, starring Kenneth Branagh. I wonder Mary Shelley and Doctor Polidori would think of these movies if they could come back and see them.

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

THE OXFORD AND CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY BOAT RACE 

The first Boat Race was a memorable occasion and took place in 1829. One of the (FOUND) of the race was Charles Wordsworth, who had (SUCCESS) established the university cricket match in 1827. Today, almost two centuries later, one of the most (AMAZE) things about the Race is its popularity worldwide. In fact, there is even a Boat Race society which is responsible for the annual (DISTRIBUTE) of videos of the Race to all its members.

The Race is rowed on the River Thames in London over a length of about four miles. Thousands stand on the banks to watch, however (PLEASE) and cold the weather might be. Just (OCCASION) if the weather is very windy, a boat may fill with water and sink, a (DRAMA) sight, and obviously a great (EMBARRASS) to the boat's crew.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Although it looks easy, that dance is actually quite difficult. (NOT)

=> That dance is looks.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

You can still get a ticket for tonight’s concert if you haven't got one already. (UNLESS)

=> You can still get a ticket for tonight's concert already.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

This is a very dry part of the country. (HARDLY)

=> In this part of the country, rains.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

I'm sorry I went out last night. (WISH)

=> I out last night. 

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Richard's parents did not allow him to drive their car. (LET)

Richard's parents drive their car.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Tamsin was the only student who hadn't done her homework. (APART)

=> All the students done their homework.

You are going to read a magazine article about travel guidebooks. Choose the answer which you think fits best according to the text.

Writing guidebooks

Nick Inman on where travel guide authors are going.

When I tell someone I write travel guides for a living, I can see the envy in their eyes. '365 days' paid holiday a year,' they think. And why should I tell them it's really not at all like that? I've made a pretty good living out of it. Only now, I'm told, the so-called holiday is about to end.

It was widely reported last year that sales of guidebooks are falling fast, thanks to developments in the Internet and mobile phones. It makes sense. Why bother taking a heavy book with you when you can download all the information you need to your phone as you walk around the cathedral?

Writing a new book about a place is a rewarding job, but one that's becoming a rarity. Publishers are more concerned with keeping existing books up to date than bringing out new ones in an already crowded market. This is understandable, since every guidebook is actually out of date as soon as it is published. It may have been researched a year before being printed and it could have sat on the bookshop shelf for a year or two, so its information might be three years old by the time the reader uses it in practice. It is hardly surprising, therefore, that some publishers are investing almost as much in updating and redesigning their books as they did creating them. Updating guides is nowadays a good way for new writers to get started.

But if the Internet via a mobile phone can deliver information just as well as printed paper but much faster, at almost no cost, is there a future for the printed guidebook? Other books you read at home, but a travel guide's main purpose is for urgent reference when you're desperate to find accommodation or somewhere to eat. Using a modern cellphone, any traveller can now enjoy a 'paperless holiday' Want to know the opening times of the museum? Look them up online. Need some information on the ancient building you're standing in? Download it.

'We did an experiment last year when we went to Macedonia and Serbia,' says Jan Dodd, author of the Rough Guides to Vietnam and Japan. 'We had no guidebook but got by fine with internet cafés, using online sources for train information, hotels, even restaurants occasionally. We missed the historical background, but you could probably find that online, too.'

Although sales of some guidebook series are not doing so well, the effects of the IT revolution may not prove as serious as they first seem. People get excited about new technology and forget to think clearly. 'I saw one tourist couple who were carrying around all their downloads in a pile of neat plastic envelopes,' observed Nick Rider, author of Cadogan's Yucatån and Mayan Mexico guides, after a recent trip. 'The fact that people print things out means that the printed word is still very useful, though a good book would actually be much easier to carry around.' And books still have some advantages over computers and mobile phones. Not everyone likes looking at a screen, particularly in bright sunlight. Not everywhere on earth has a reliable internet connection. And who wants to spend all that time in a hotel room recharging batteries?

The Internet's strength of total democracy, enabling anyone to write whatever they like, is also its weakness. 'A huge amount of what's around on the net is boring, unedited, untested, uninformed and untrustworthy,' says Rider. 'Another large percentage of net material is basically advertising, and so equally untrustworthy. Also, internet searches about destinations often produce facts and figures that are years out of date.'

The travel guide will have to adapt to changing travel habits but it isn't finished yet. 'The guidebook is not going to disappear - at least not for a considerable amount of time. That's the general opinion among our members,' says Mary Anne Evans of the Guild of Travel Writers. 'Publishers themselves really do not know what the Internet is capable of, and currently the thinking is that the two will coexist.' Let's hope I'll be 'on holiday' for a good while yet.

How does Nick Inman feel about his job?
  • He isn't paid enough money for it.
  • It is a pity that it has now finished.
  • He likes being on holiday all the time.
  • People have the wrong idea about it.

What is meant by 'It makes sense'?

  • This is partly true.
  • It is not easy to understand.
  • This is not surprising.
  • It is foolish to think that.
What does Nick Inman suggest about guidebooks in the fourth paragraph?
  • They contain information that cannot be found elsewhere.
  • People tend to study them before they set off on a journey.
  • They are still cheaper than using more modern technology.
  • People use them when they need information in a hurry.

The main purpose of Jan Dodd's experiment was to find out _____

  • whether a guidebook was necessary.
  • facts about the two countries' history.
  • how good her own guidebook was.
  • how to travel and where to stay.
Which of the following best describes what Nick Rider says about the Internet?
  • Its travel advertisements usually give the best information.
  • It is quite difficult to find reliable travel information there.
  • Information about the places tourists visit is regularly updated.
  • The processing of information is not democratic enough.
What does Mary Anne Evans say about the future of traveller information?
  • People will want to use both the Internet and guidebooks.
  • Publishers are sure the Internet cannot compete with guidebooks.
  • Before long, guidebooks will no longer be available.
  • There will always be a demand for guidebooks as they are now.

You are going to read an article about an unusual photograph. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. These are stories that many people believe but which often have no basis in fact.

B. I was talking to them about it one day and we were discussing what had happened to the lighthouse keeper.

C. To avoid this, they provided extra photographs to back up their explanation.

D. Then, after satisfying his curiosity, he simply closed the door again and was completely unharmed.

E. Although I searched the Internet for ages I was unable to find an address for him, though there were hundreds of sites where I could buy the poster.

F. I wondered why he hadn't tried to rescue the lighthouse keeper, instead of just taking photographs of him from the aircraft.

G. The wind is very strong, and it is surprising that the man looks unafraid.

THE MAN IN THE DOORWAY

A couple of years ago my friend Jack gave me a poster as a birthday present. It's an aerial photograph of a huge wave breaking around a lighthouse during a terrible storm. Standing in the doorway of the lighthouse is a man. This person must be the lighthouse keeper, and the whole picture is very dramatic.

I put the poster on my bathroom wall and I have looked at it almost every day since Jack gave it to me. I've seen postcards with the same picture, and a couple of my friends have the same poster. One of my friends claimed that the man had been killed by the wave a few seconds after the photograph was taken. She said that this was common knowledge and that that was why the photograph was so popular.

I was horrified. It seemed terrible that someone would make money out of a photograph taken just before someone had died. Worse still, since it had been taken from the air, the photographer must have been safe in a helicopter. The more I thought about it, the less comfortable I felt about the poster. Eventually, I took it down and put it in a cupboard.

Even though it wasn't on the wall anymore I couldn't get it out of my mind. The photographer's name, Jean Guichard, was in small print just below the image and I decided to try to contact him. Guichard himself seemed to have disappeared without trace and there was no way of getting in touch with him.

I did, however, find some information on a website about urban myths. This site described the same story my friend had told me about the photographer capturing the last few seconds of the lighthouse keeper's life. A lot of people believed this story, and they had complained to the poster company about the publication of such a macabre image. I then followed the link to the poster company's webpage and it was there that I discovered the real story, which the company had published to stop the complaints.

Apparently the storm had lasted for days and the lighthouse keeper, Theodore Malgorne, was holding on, hoping the lighthouse would survive the strong waves. Malgorne had heard the noise of the helicopter, and was intrigued. In spite of the danger, he opened the door of the lighthouse to see who was flying by on such a terrible night.

The poster company obviously thought that some people might not simply take their word for it. There are two images: the one in the poster and a second one showing Malgorne stepping inside and closing the door. So that's one mystery solved. The really strange thing is that there's no information about Guichard, the photographer. Now I wonder what happened to him!

You are going to read a magazine article about graduates who are just starting their careers after a long period of study. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

Graduate paths

Four recent graduates look back on their educational achievements.

A. Hashi 
I came to London from East Africa aged nine, without a word of English. I attended an average state school in London. I didn't really pay much attention there, but I scraped through my school leaving exams and got a place at university to study law, though I never really expected to become a lawyer. When I finished, I wrote a cheeky email to the editor of a TV news programme. I told him I had no experience, but wanted to become a journalist. He put me onto a  work-placement project, gave me a salary, and let me work on several news programmes. I owe a lot to that man. He was willing to take a chance on me. My story is a combination of people believing in me and having the self-discipline to work very hard. That's not something you can expect from every child however, so it would be unfair to hold me up as an example to follow. 

B. Amanda 
Architecture's always interested me, but my heart wasn't set on it from childhood. I guess it was living in so many different cities that made me appreciate how architecture defines places. I went to high school in Oregon, USA. I studied hard because I knew I wanted to get out of there. I went travelling at the first opportunity. There are no architects in my family, but I learnt the value of hard work from my step-father. I did a foundation art course at a London university, and through that I got myself into the Architectural Association School. It's pretty competitive with only thirty-eight students in my year, but it appealed to me because it's like a close-knit community. Architecture is creative but it's also very rigorous. You have to know the reasoning behind what you do. It takes seven years before you can call yourself an architect, which is a pretty big undertaking. 

C. Kevin 
I never felt any great desire to follow in my father's footsteps and do medicine, though that is the subject eventually did. Actually, as a teenager, I wanted to join the army because our school had a keen cadet force, and at sixteen I applied and got a place at officer-training college. You have seven years to take the place up before it expires - so there's time to finish school and go to university before starting your army career. I had a  great time at university in London. I have a strong work ethic, but I also did other stuff - played rugby, had big nights out. You don't really appreciate how competitive medicine is until you've graduated though - because certain specialisms are really tough to get into, and some people on the course came away disappointed. Luckily, the army is happy for me to specialise in surgery, and I'll be doing that alongside the officer training. 

D. Marlene 
My dad was a journalist - working for German radio in London and Washington when I was a kid. He knew nothing about fashion, but it was living abroad that sparked my interest in the subject. I took sewing lessons from the age of twelve, and it was always more than a hobby. On leaving school, I did an internship at a theatre, doing costume design, but found it wasn't really for me. So I did some drawings and sent them off to Art School in London and got a place there instead. I loved having tutors who knew what they were talking about and really criticised you. As part of the course, I did a couple of three-month internships, including one at a major fashion house, which particularly shaped me. Some of the other interns were a  bit half-hearted or went home early. Not me! 

Which graduate acknowledges the positive influence of one family member?
  • Hashi
  • Amanda
  • Kevin
  • Marlene
Which graduate admits to not studying particularly hard at one point?
  • Hashi
  • Amanda
  • Kevin
  • Marlene
Which graduate chose one place of study because of the atmosphere amongst the students?
  • Hashi
  • Amanda
  • Kevin
  • Marlene
Which graduate expresses gratitude for the support of one imaginative individual?
  • Hashi
  • Amanda
  • Kevin
  • Marlene
Which graduate feels relatively fortunate compared to some fellow students?
  • Hashi
  • Amanda
  • Kevin
  • Marlene
Which graduate mentions being given a time limit within which to accept an offer?
  • Hashi
  • Amanda
  • Kevin
  • Marlene
Which graduate praises the attitude of staff in one educational institution?
  • Hashi
  • Amanda
  • Kevin
  • Marlene

Which graduate prefers not to be regarded as a role model for other young people?

  • Hashi
  • Amanda
  • Kevin
  • Marlene

Which graduate says that one period of work experience helped to rule out a career option?

  • Hashi
  • Amanda
  • Kevin
  • Marlene

Which graduate was keen to leave one part of the world as a teenager?

  • Hashi
  • Amanda
  • Kevin
  • Marlene