FCE Test 16 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

8/13/2021 5:11:10 PM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

POLAR ADVENTURER

In March 1999, Amyr Klink, a Brazilian yachtsman and polar adventurer, became the first man to circle Antarctica while staying south of 50 degrees latitude. He took the most dangerous sea route in the world. Klink was already known because in 1984 he had rowed across the Atlantic in a small boat. The book which he wrote, based on his experiences on that trip, had by then millions of copies.

For his polar adventure, Klink built his own boat. He off in 1998 from South Georgia and he arrived back there 88 days later - although he spent eleven of those days on dry land in Antarctica. He did not stop there out of , but because he wanted to see the Antarctic Peninsula.

Klink knew that his would be dangerous. On the way, he had to be careful to avoid huge floating blocks of ice. These icebergs, as they are called, were everywhere and hitting one of them would have been a disaster. As Klink knew that any rescue mission would have been impossible in the rough seas, he did not to take a lite-boat.

When he sailed into strong winds 750 miles south of Tasmania, he met waves that were twenty-five metres high. This meant staying awake most of the time. He only managed to sleep for twenty-minute at a stretch. But he succeeded in the end, all the difficulties that he had to face.

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

FAST TRACK TO FLUENCY

A couple of generations ago, a bilingual child - in other words, a child who spoke more than one language - was regarded with suspicion. People thought that such a child would be slow to develop academically, would feel confused, and even up with a split personality.

Today, however, research shows the advantages of a bilingual upbringing, including an awareness of other cultures and an increased ability language learning.

Tests out in Canada presented small children with two apartment blocks made of building bricks; the larger apartment contained fewer bricks, children who were not bilingual said that the larger apartment had more bricks, bilingual children correctly saw that the one had more bricks. The bilingual children appeared to have the ability to ignore misleading information when dealing with problems, in much the way as they "edit out" one language when using the other.

According to the research, as well as developing problem-solving skills earlier than those who only speak one language, bilingual children also understand written languages faster learn to read more easily.

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

UNDERSTANDING FOOD ALLERGIES

Allergies can dramatically affect the lives of millions of people. Flowers, pets and even house dust can make people itch, sneeze, scratch and feel generally (MISERY) . There are also a lot of foods that cause allergic (REACT) . Some of these are so extreme that they can be really dangerous. That's why a knowledge of which foods potentially pose a threat can save someone' life. Only a small number of foods cause the (MAJOR) of allergies. These include milk, eggs, nuts, wheat, fish and shellfish. The most common symptoms are difficulty breathing, skin rashes and (SICK) . Sometimes the symptoms appear (IMMEDIATE) after the person has eaten a meal including one of these ingredients. If the throat swells and the person cannot breathe properly, expert (PROFESSION) advice from a hospital or health centre should be sought. This may sound (ALARM) . But in fact, only a few people who believe they have food allergies really do have them. Most are actually only suffering from some form of 'food (TOLERATE) ', and as unpleasant as this may be, it certainly won't kill you!

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

I wish I hadn't missed your birthday party. (REGRET)

=> I your birthday party.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

I'm sure it was a surprise when you saw Jake at the party. (BEEN)

=> You see Jake at the party.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Golf is becoming increasingly popular in Britain. (POPULARITY)

=> The in Britain.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Not many people have signed up for the trip to London. (NUMBER)

=> Only people have signed up for the trip to London.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

We would go to the mountains every summer when I was a child. (USED)

=> We to the mountains every summer when I was a child. 

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

A second-hand car is cheaper than a new one. (EXPENSIVE)

=> A second-hand car a new one.

You are going to read an extract from an article about the Olympic Games. Choose the answer which you think fits best according to the text.

The original Olympic hero

In what is probably the first memorable sporting action photo, we see a  tiny man with a moustache, bent backwards, eyes closing in exhaustion, a handkerchief slipping off his head, surrounded by officials as he finishes the marathon at the London Olympics of 1908. The man was Dorando Pietri, an Italian baker. In many ways, this was the beginning of global media coverage for big sporting events, and Pietri became the first global sporting celebrity. 

Early last century, when Pietri began running in his hometown of Carpi in northern Italy, the ancient Greek's idea of the marathon race was just being rediscovered. The course for the London Games was set by Britain's Queen Alexandra, who decided that for her grandchildren's convenience. The race should start beneath the nursery window at their home, Windsor Castle. The finish line in London's White City stadium was 26 miles and 385 yards away - which remains the marathon's official distance today. 

Back then, the best preparation for running a marathon was believed to be steak for breakfast. Pietri had also taken a chemical called strychnine - today typically used in rat poison - in the mistaken belief that it would improve his performance. By the time he approached White City, he understandably felt a little unwell. He later recalled seeing 'a grey mass in front', which proved to be the stadium. He added, 'After that, I remember little.' 

It soon became obvious that Pietri was struggling. He began running the wrong way around the track. When officials pointed this out to him, he fell over. He got up, then collapsed again. Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, was watching from a few metres away, reporting for the Daily Mail. He wrote: 'It is horrible, and yet fascinating, this struggle between a set purpose and an utterly exhausted frame.' 

The crowd - including Queen Alexandra - began urging the officials to help Pietri. Pietri kept collapsing, but eventually they practically pushed him across the finish line. Conan Doyle was impressed: 'No ancient Roman had known how to accept the laurels of victory better than Pietri.' Seconds after Pietri, the American runner Johnny Hayes, a sales clerk at Bloomingdale's department store in New York, trotted over the line. Quite naturally, Hayes pointed out that Pietri had been helped, which was against the rules. After much debate, Hayes was declared the winner. Pietri fell unconscious, and several newspapers prematurely reported his death. 

There is no celebrity without mass media. If you could choose anyone on earth to write up your drama in 1908, it would be Conan Doyle in the Daily Mail, which in 1902 had become the bestselling newspaper on earth, with circulation topping one million. Newspapers around the world reprinted Conan Doyle's article. He also started a collection to help Pietri set up his own bakery. Throw in the startling action picture by an unknown photographer, and Pietri's story went global. 

What moved the world in 1908 was the sight of an ordinary man attempting something extraordinary. Nowadays people dressed in Donald Duck costumes run double marathons for charity, but in 1908 completing a marathon was considered an almost superhuman feat. To my mind, that distinguishes Pietri from the Olympic heroes of today. Most of them have lived since childhood in a higher realm of top-performance sport. They are better prepared than Pietri in every way, but it is much easier to see ourselves in him. 

The length of the modern marathon race _____
  • was based on measurements used in ancient games.
  • used to be changed quite often at the Olympic Games.
  • used to be much longer than it is in the current Games.
  • was originally fixed at the 1908 London Olympic Games.
In the third paragraph, the writer suggests that Pietri's preparation for the race _____
  • had ignored expert advice.
  • hadn't really been appropriate.
  • had been interrupted by illness.
  • had not involved running the course itself.
The word 'this' refers to _____
  • Pietri's state of health.
  • an error which Pietri made.
  • an attempt to give Pietri first, aid.
  • the correct direction in which Pietri should run.
What impressed Sir Arthur Conan Doyle about the end of the race?
  • Pietri's determination to finish it
  • Pietri's willingness to accept defeat
  • The way Pietri was helped to complete it
  • The respect which Pietri showed for the rules
What does the writer suggest in the sixth paragraph?
  • Conan Doyle felt that he had treated Pietri badly.
  • Pietri didn't approve of what was written about him.
  • Pietri benefitted from the fact that Conan Doyle was famous.
  • The photograph of Pietri was more important than the newspaper article.
In the final paragraph, the writer expresses _____
  • admiration for Pietri's attempt at the marathon.
  • surprise that Pietri attracted so much media attention.
  • doubts about the commitment of some modern athletes.
  • disappointment with the way modern marathons are organised.

You are going to read a magazine article about the Hebrides Islands in Scotland. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. There are now a number of companies offering such trips.

B. However, only about 40 out of the hundreds of islands are permanently inhabited.

C. This is more than enough to put off the casual guest.

D. And in the waters around them you can find not only dolphins but whales and the mighty sea eagle as well.

E. But once you've watched dolphins leap through the dazzling water around your boat, you'll think they are paradise.

F. Moreover, the fate of the islands and their people are bound together.

G. Despite being relatively unspoiled, the Hebrides are also facing many pressures.

H. Suddenly someone shouted: a splash in the water, half a mile away.

BRITAIN'S WILDEST PLACE

by Jon Orchard-Smith

It was just after 5 a.m. and the summer sun was rising over the mountains as the Marguerite Explorer sailed out of the loch into the calm waters of the sea. I was at the wheel - under the watching: eye of the captain. A few of the other dozen passengers and crew were on deck, clutching mugs of coffee. (0) H In the morning light, a dozen dolphins, grey and graceful, were swimming straight towards us.

The Hebrides, a group of islands off the Scottish coast, offer tourists a diversity of wildlife and scenery with few equals in the UK. In places it is possible to see such marine animals from the shore but to have the best views, you need to be on a boat.

The Marguerite Explorer was the first boat to offer whale-watching holidays throughout the Hebrides. Under the command of Christopher Swann, the crew of the Marguerite have worked with some of the world's leading sea-life scientists. They are very knowledgeable guides to the islands.

The Hebridan archipelago stretches nearly 250 miles top to bottom, covers over a hundred miles from side to side and has about 2,500 miles of coastline. This relative lack of people, together with freedom from pollution, helps to make the Hebrides a haven for rare flowers and plants.

Some of the islands are under threat from mining and throughout the islands, developments such as fish farms, which are vital to the local economy, affect the environment too.

The Hebrides have their share of problems, but they are unbelievably beautiful. Why, then, aren't they packed with tourists? While visitors are an increasingly important part of the island economy, tourism is still low-key, compared with some other parts of Britain. The answer may be that the prevailing Hebridean climate is wet and windy.

Another discouraging factor is the wildlife the tourists least want to see - the insects, especially the mosquitoes. Particularly between July and September, visitors can expect to be severely bitten. Like 50 many wild places, the Hebrides can be hard on visitors.   And you will feel you will want to return to them, as I felt when I approached the end of my journey in the Marguerite Explorer.

You are going to read a magazine article about people who bought clothes in different ways. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

Shopping for clothes

A. Brad Stevens
I was food shopping in the big supermarket near here and I saw they were selling jeans at a ridiculously low price, so I thought I'd pick up a pair. Later when I remembered I had a job interview the week after, I realised I should have bought some formal trousers instead, but I suppose it was just one of those things you suddenly do when you see something going cheap, even though I probably could have got them for less on eBay. Anyway, I spent quite a bit of time going through this great pile of jeans because all the different sizes were mixed up and they weren't very clearly marked 'large' or 'extra large' or whatever. Eventually, I came across a pair that seemed about my size and headed for the checkout. It was very slow there, and I got fed up standing in a line of about ten customers. Why they don't open more checkouts at busy times I really don't know.

B. Sara Desai 
I saw a stall selling sweaters when I was wandering around my usual clothes market and there was such a wide range of lovely ones that I was spoilt for choice. In the end I made my mind up and I enquired whether they had a particularly attractive pale blue one in medium. The stallholder said they had. I couldn't try it on there and then but I was sure it would fit me, so I paid and took it home. There I discovered that the sleeves were far too short so I had to take it back. That was annoying, but the man on the stall quickly found me a larger one for the same very reasonable price and that turned out to be just right on me. I'd wasted an hour or so travelling to and from the market, but I still wouldn't dream of shopping for things like that anywhere else.

C. Tania Ferreira 
I was walking along the pavement looking for something new to wear when a sign in a shop window saying 'cotton jackets 50% off' caught my eye, so I went in. They didn't have one in my size but said they could order it for me. A few days later they called me to say it'd arrived and I went back to the shop to collect it. It fitted me perfectly, but when I tried it on, I just didn't take to the colour, a kind of grey-brown, and I said I'd prefer a lighter one. Again I had to wait, and again I went back to the shop. This time everything seemed fine, and I paid for it and took it home. After I'd worn it twice, though, I put it through the washing machine and was most upset to find it'd shrunk, despite the fact that I'd followed the washing instructions exactly. It was a waste of money, really.

D. Ali Haddad 
I'd picked up lots of things like books and computer games online, but that was the first time I'd actually got myself something to wear over the Internet. It looked like a really lovely shirt and the price was incredibly low, so I clicked on 'Buy it now', paid by credit card and waited for it to arrive. I thought afterwards that perhaps I should have emailed the seller to check the colour, because although it looked fine in the photo, it might not be exactly what I wanted. In the event I needn't have worried, and I was absolutely delighted when I saw it. I would have got another one if I'd known how good it would look.

Which person was pleased with a replacement item?
  • Brad Stevens
  • Sara Desai
  • Tania Ferreira
  • Ali Haddad
Which person regretted not buying a different kind of item?
  • Brad Stevens
  • Sara Desai
  • Tania Ferreira
  • Ali Haddad
Which person was disappointed with the item after they had owned it for some time?
  • Brad Stevens
  • Sara Desai
  • Tania Ferreira
  • Ali Haddad
Which person had difficulty deciding which to buy as there were so many attractive items?
  • Brad Stevens
  • Sara Desai
  • Tania Ferreira
  • Ali Haddad
Which person became impatient while waiting to pay for the item?
  • Brad Stevens
  • Sara Desai
  • Tania Ferreira
  • Ali Haddad
Which person had not previously bought clothes that way?
  • Brad Stevens
  • Sara Desai
  • Tania Ferreira
  • Ali Haddad
Which person asked the seller a question about the item before they bought it?
  • Brad Stevens
  • Sara Desai
  • Tania Ferreira
  • Ali Haddad
Which person had not intended to buy clothes there?
  • Brad Stevens
  • Sara Desai
  • Tania Ferreira
  • Ali Haddad
Which person was in the street when they saw the item advertised?
  • Brad Stevens
  • Sara Desai
  • Tania Ferreira
  • Ali Haddad
Which person wished they had bought more than one of the same item?
  • Brad Stevens
  • Sara Desai
  • Tania Ferreira
  • Ali Haddad