FCE Test 20 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

8/30/2021 10:03:33 AM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

THE HARD SELL

Most companies spend a large proportion of their budgets persuading us to buy their products, and it is their executives who have to decide how to make consumers aware of new products. To do this, they usually set up an advertising of some kind. Generally, a new product involves TV and radio commercials, and there may also be large advertisements on along motorways and major roads.

In the past, companies employed people to sell the product but nowadays there is a far more popular technique which uses the telephone. Staff in large call-centres telephone potential customers, tell them about the product and try to convince them that it is worth buying. Another technique is to the new product by post. The company sends colourful to every house even though people haven't asked for them. They are so unpopular that people call them mail - and even though they may contain free samples discount vouchers, many people just put them straight into the rubbish bin!

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

SPORTS TOURISM

Hundreds of thousands of fans travel worldwide to watch their favorite sport - an international match, a tennis championship, a Formula One Grand Prix.

In recent years, there has been a huge increase in sports tourism. longer are people content to in an armchair to watch their teams or sporting stars on television. They want to be the action is, so they pack their bags and head straight for the airport.

In to the usual sporting events, the Olympic Games are held four years. The Olympics may only last a couple of weeks, but they affect the host city for several years before. New facilities to be built, not just for the Games themselves also for the thousands of international visitors who come to stay. The effects are also felt outside the host city, as many visitors choose to explore the surrounding region, and this has a lasting effect on tourism in the country. For example, the 1992 Olympic Games were held in Barcelona, in Spain, the city has become an extremely popular tourist destination.

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

HAPPY IS HEALTHY

Medical research has found that happiness has a strongly beneficial effect on health. The healing properties of (LAUGH) are such that humour is now being used alongside more traditional courses of (TREAT) in some hospitals. In a London children's hospital, for example, two clowns are provided for the entertainment of patients. Doctors say that these clowns are (SUCCESS) in making the children feel better.

It seems that when we laugh, there can be a (REDUCE) in both blood pressure and the amount of (TENSE) in our muscles. Although it is (POSSIBLE) to prove it at the moment, this may also mean that people who feel unhappy and who are, therefore, (LIKELY) to laugh so much, suffer more often from physical (ILL) .

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

It is not advisable for Jane to request a bank loan at the moment. (OUGHT)

=> Jane a bank loan at the moment.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Can you tell me the population of India? (WHAT)

=> Do population of India is?

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

They think the jewel thief is planning another crime. (THOUGHT)

=> The jewel thief planning another crime. 

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

She said I had stolen the money. (ACCUSED)

=> She the money.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

That woman's father made a fortune when he sold his business. (IS)

=> That made a fortune when he sold his business. 

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Julio is not a very good cook, so he won't get a job in that restaurant. (ENOUGH)

=> Julio doesn't to get a job in that restaurant. 

You are going to read an extract from a short story. Choose the answer which you think fits best according to the text.

CHANGES

Jake finished tying his boots, stood up and stamped his feet on the tiled floor of the changing room. The noise of his studs was lost in the chaos of ten other boys getting changed, shouting insults, boasting about what they were going to do in the match. Jake looked up as a towel flew past his head. 'Think you can get it in their net this week?' It was Ben, grinning as he pulled his number nine shirt over his head. Jake blushed briefly as he remembered the own goal he had scored in the last match. He knew Ben meant no real harm, but the memory of the weary silence from his own teammates and the laughter and celebrations of their opponents hurt anyway. He threw the towel back to cover his embarrassment. Mr McIver, the P.E. teacher, stuck his head around the door. The noise level fell a little. 'All right, lads,' he said. 'I want a hundred percent out there today. And that means you, Smithy.' The boy he was referring to smiled sheepishly. 'I want all of you out there in two minutes. Get a move on!' He disappeared and there was a new sense of urgency about the changing room, with those boys who had not yet put on their boots starting to rush. 

Ben sat down next to Jake with a thoughtful look on his face, his elbows on his knees and his head in his hands. It made Jake slightly uneasy and he started to check his boots, which he already knew were perfectly fine. Jake liked to keep things on a light, joking level and tried to avoid getting too serious, too emotional, as if he was afraid of opening a door somewhere because of what he might find inside. A few of the boys started to disappear out of the door, their boots clicking as they walked. Ben watched them leave and then spoke. 'It's all changing, isn't it?' Jake looked around the room, which looked the same to him as it had always done and then realised that Ben was talking about something else. Ben stood to look out of the small window, shouts from the first boys to reach the pitch drifting back into the room. 'They don't know it yet, but it's all changing. Two months, then the summer, then we'll be in the sixth form and everything will be different.' The sixth form meant more work, more exams, but they were used to that, so Jake couldn't see what Ben was getting at. Things changed every year. Why was Ben in this mood? 

'I suppose so,' said Jake, finally. Then he remembered that Ben's brother, Sean, was going away to university that year. Ben was very close to Sean, closer even than he was to Jake, and Sean's leaving would turn his world upside-down. Jake watched the last of the other boys leave. 'Maybe we'd better go out,' he said, quietly. Ben looked at him. 'Yes, maybe,' he said after a moment, but made no move towards the door. Jake stood and kicked a sock across the room. 'He'll be back,' he said and Ben nodded, grateful that Jake had understood what was bothering him without needing an explanation. 

'I know,' Ben said. They began to walk out of the changing room, along the short corridor and out into the sunshine. The sound of shouts and a whistle came down to them from the pitch. Ben put his hand on Jake's shoulder and stopped him. 'Look,' he said and pointed back the way they had come. Jake looked at the school building. He saw nothing unusual about the red-brick walls, with their high windows, or the entrance to the building, where one or two students he recognized stood chatting. 'What? Looks just the same as ever to me,' he said. As he turned, he realized that Ben had already started to run towards the pitch. As he ran, Ben turned, running backwards for a few paces, facing Jake. 'Exactly!' he shouted, then turned again as he reached the pitch and lost himself in the excited mass of boys chasing the ball.

What is Jake reminded of by Ben at the start of the extract?
  • A mistake he made
  • A time when they were not friends
  • An enjoyable time they spent together
  • An occasion when Ben hurt himself
Why does Jake check his boots?
  • He wants to make sure he is completely ready.
  • He feels slightly uncomfortable with the situation.
  • He wants to show Ben how easy he finds it.
  • He is trying to make Ben feel more comfortable.
What does Jake not understand at first?
  • What Ben is referring to
  • What being in the sixth form really means
  • How much Ben has changed
  • Why they have to work so hard
Why is Ben in a thoughtful mood?
  • He wants to go to university.
  • He is sorry that Jake doesn't like Sean.
  • He thinks Sean is making the wrong decision.
  • He is about to be parted from someone he loves.

Ben is pleased by the fact that ____

  • Jake feels the same as he does about the situation.
  • his explanation is clear enough for Jake to understand.
  • Jake is able to explain things in a way he understands.
  • Jake knows how he feels without being told.
Why does Ben point to the school building?
  • He wants to show how it never changes.
  • He wants Jake to identify the students.
  • He hopes that he can get away from Jake.
  • He sees something through one of the windows.

You are going to read an article by a painter about his search for his grandfather's pictures. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. Like them, my work - paintings of cities and portraits - is about observing the world around me and expressing that reality in colour. 

B. He started out as an office boy, sketching people as they came in and out. 

C. It's like the person is actually there. 

D. I was thrilled, but it was way out of my price range. 

E. One was found in a basement at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. 

F. You could say the brush was passed down­ from Leopold to Richard to myself. 

G. There are, however, still fifty or so out there somewhere that I'd love to see.

My grandfather's paintings

My grandfather, Leopold Seyffert, was one of the most famous American portrait painters of the early 20th century. His paintings of personalities from the cultural and business elite made him rich. But as trends in contemporary art changed in the second half of the century, his work went out of fashion. Many of his portraits were lost or stashed away in attics. I've spent years now tracking them down. 

lt all began one day when I came across one of my grandfather's paintings by chance in a Hollywood antiques shop. lt was a portrait of Elsie Whelan, the daughter of a Philadelphia banker, and in perfect condition. After that, I began to wake up in the middle of the night wondering where all his paintings were. Was this one hanging in someone's hallway? Was that one stuffed in a basement or attic? As a painter myself, I see portraits as important social documents, and I developed a  desire to seek them out. 

All the portraits have stories attached to them. A couple more were in a storage unit in Connecticut- the owner emailed me out of the blue saying she had a bunch of Leopold's stuff. Others I've tracked down online. Because Leopold was such a good technician, his works are typically in great shape. Even if one was painted in 1904, it looks like it was painted in 2014. 

My grandfather led an incredible life. He went from being a German immigrant kid without a high-school education to making $68,000 a year during the Great Depression of the 1930s. One day, his boss saw his drawings and said, 'I'll pay for you to go to art school.' Leopold attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where he studied with William Merritt Chase. 

Leopold died in 1956, a few years after I was born, so we didn't know each other. But I feel a connection to him through my own work. His son, my uncle Richard, was also a successful artist who did portraits of famous people. I knew him well, and he was heavily influenced by his father. A few years ago, I organized an exhibition of all our work that travelled to galleries across the USA. 

I'm winding down my hunt for my grandfather's paintings. They're gradually all coming to light now and the Smithsonian Museum has digitized many so that there's a record of them. For example, Leopold's portrait of Francis Ayer of NW Ayer & Son, one of the first advertising companies in America, is sitting in a vault somewhere.

The most recent Leopold work that I acquired is a portrait of Duane Van Vechten, the arts patron. I have it hanging in my studio. It's remarkable. I love saying hello to it when I arrive in the morning and goodbye when I leave. That's what's amazing about these things. There's a human connection, passed down through the years from my grandfather to me. 

You are going to read about four people's nightmare holidays. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

My nightmare holiday!

A. Pauline Vernon - Malaysia
My dad was teaching in Kota Bharu, Malaysia. When my mum and I flew out to visit him for three weeks, he had already organised our stay in great detail. On our first evening, we had a party on the beach. It was an idyllic scene: a beautiful empty beach, palm trees, white sand, the warm gentle waters of the South China Sea. I swam in the shallow water thinking "this is the life", when a jellyfish swam between my legs. The sting, on both legs, was agony, and it was only then I discovered that two people had died from jellyfish stings that year and until that point, no one had bothered to mention the sea-snakes, for whose bite there is no cure. I now understood why the beach was deserted. 

B. Sandy Henderson - the USA 
I was on a camping holiday in Yosemite National Park in California with a friend, when I awoke to the sound of screaming. I looked out of my tent and saw my friend trying to get out of his sleeping bag, with a giant black bear rearing up behind him. Quite possibly the quickest I've ever got out of bed, I scrambled up and we both sprinted in no particular direction. By pure chance, we'd passed a small cabin a little way back on the trail and we made a dash for that, jumped inside and locked the door. Seconds later, the bear was scraping at the door as we cowered inside, afraid that the whole thing might fall off. After quite a long time, the bear lost interest and we were able to leave the shelter. 

C. Cat O'Donovan - the USA 
Twenty-three hours into an epic bus trip across the States, I began to wonder what I had let myself in for. I was at Denver bus station, sitting on my backpack, drinking coffee. Before boarding the first bus in LA, I had been filled with romantic ideas of friendship among the passengers and fascinating stops, as well as spectacular scenery. After the guy next to me had finished talking about his time in jail, I realised my expectations were a bit off. After all, I was 17 and travelling alone. 
I had no idea when the next bus was, so I went up to the counter to ask. One unfriendly staff member was so large that I feared she had eaten several passengers, so I waited until her colleague was free. 
"Three-and-a-half hours," she said. I groaned. Would I ever reach New York? I sat back down to drink my coffee. 

D. Graham Whitely - Nepal 
It was not my first walking holiday to Nepal, but for some reason I no longer remember, I decided to go several weeks before the walking season actually began. There were no other walkers on the flight to Kathmandu, which suggested I might not have made the best decision. Walking to my empty hotel through rainy streets on the first night, I tried not to think what conditions would be like at higher altitudes. 
Next day I flew to Tumlingtar to start walking up the remote, rarely visited Arun valley. As I climbed, the bushes on either side of the path were covered in ice and the weather was constantly cloudy. The lodges where I stayed were run by people who spoke no English, and the only meal available was boiled rice with lentil soup. 
Each day required at least eight hours of unpleasant solitary walking, longing for a conversation with someone. During all the long walk towards Kathmandu, it continued cloudy and I never even saw a mountain.

Which person had to hide from danger?
  • Pauline Vernon - Malaysia
  • Sandy Henderson - the USA
  • Cat O'Donovan - the USA
  • Graham Whitely - Nepal
Which person found an employee intimidating?
  • Pauline Vernon - Malaysia
  • Sandy Henderson - the USA
  • Cat O'Donovan - the USA
  • Graham Whitely - Nepal
Which person was not pleased to spend so long somewhere?
  • Pauline Vernon - Malaysia
  • Sandy Henderson - the USA
  • Cat O'Donovan - the USA
  • Graham Whitely - Nepal
Which person had visited the country on a previous occasion?
  • Pauline Vernon - Malaysia
  • Sandy Henderson - the USA
  • Cat O'Donovan - the USA
  • Graham Whitely - Nepal
Which person worried about how strong something was?
  • Pauline Vernon - Malaysia
  • Sandy Henderson - the USA
  • Cat O'Donovan - the USA
  • Graham Whitely - Nepal
Which person missed speaking to people?
  • Pauline Vernon - Malaysia
  • Sandy Henderson - the USA
  • Cat O'Donovan - the USA
  • Graham Whitely - Nepal
Which person had a painful experience?
  • Pauline Vernon - Malaysia
  • Sandy Henderson - the USA
  • Cat O'Donovan - the USA
  • Graham Whitely - Nepal
Which person travelled with an ex-criminal?
  • Pauline Vernon - Malaysia
  • Sandy Henderson - the USA
  • Cat O'Donovan - the USA
  • Graham Whitely - Nepal
Which person was unaware of the danger in what they were doing?
  • Pauline Vernon - Malaysia
  • Sandy Henderson - the USA
  • Cat O'Donovan - the USA
  • Graham Whitely - Nepal
Which person realised the holiday might be a mistake before arriving?
  • Pauline Vernon - Malaysia
  • Sandy Henderson - the USA
  • Cat O'Donovan - the USA
  • Graham Whitely - Nepal