FCE Test 21 - Reading and Use of English (có giải thích đáp án chi tiết)

9/27/2021 6:18:47 PM

Read the text and decide which answer best fits each gap.

Moso Moso

I tried Moso Moso for the first time this month, and that it was easily the best Chinese restaurant I've eaten in. 

The surroundings were modern, yet it still felt airy and cosy. The waiters were very welcoming and informative, and not too rushed, as is often the in some of the city's more popular restaurants. 

As I was eating with a party of eight, we to sample a good range of items on the menu, and between us couldn't find a single item that wasn't satisfying and delicious. Every featured wonderful combinations of flavours. All the ingredients were clearly fresh and of the highest and in my opinion, the seafood was particularly tasty. We felt that we were given very good for money, because the meal to about £15 per person which we thought was very reasonable. 

All of us would highly this restaurant and, as it is located just a short walk from our workplace, we will no doubt be back for many more lunches!

(Adapted from the Manchester Evening News)

Read the text and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only ONE word in each gap.

Preventing sports injuries

No matter what sport you play, there is always a risk of injury. In to avoid it happening to you, here are some simple rules.

Firstly, anyone is thinking of taking up a sport should make sure they’re already fit enough, necessary, by doing regular exercise before they start. People only training is at the weekend have a high rate of injury.

It is also important, particularly in contact sports like rugby, to keep to the rules, are there to protect players from serious harm. In the way, it is essential to wear equipment like helmets in high-speed sports keep your head safe.

Finally, remember that you need rest days so that your body can recover. And you should never, in any circumstances, carry training when injured.

Read the text and use the word given in capitals at each gap to form a word that fits in each gap.

The Perfect Friend

Because friendship is one of the few kinds of relationships we have control over, it is an (INTEREST) area of research for sociologists. Many studies have been done into this kind of relationship. Although we can't usually choose our (RELATE) or bosses or (TEACH) , we can choose our friends.

But how do we choose them? Out of all the people we meet in our lives, why do some become our friends, and why do we find some people's (PERSON) more attractive than others? It's not an easy question to answer, because we are all looking for similar qualities in our friends, such as (HONEST) , a good sense of humour, trustworthiness and (KIND) . However, what each of us means by 'a good sense of humour', for example, or what each of us thinks of as 'kind', are (DIFFER) . We are all unique in many ways, and so the perfect friend for one person may seem a little (BORE) to someone else! 

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

By eight o'clock I couldn't read because it was so dark. (ENOUGH)

=> By eight o'clock it wasn't read.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

It will be necessary for us to postpone the match if the weather does not improve. (PUT)

=> Unless the weather gets better, we the match.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

Years ago, a lot of people spent their holidays with relatives. (USED)

=> Years ago, a lot of people their holidays with relatives.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

What type of music do you like best? (FAVOURITE)

=> What type of music? 

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

It was raining heavily so I stayed at home. (IF)

=> I would have gone out raining heavily.

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given.

"Shall we go to the café?" said Flora. (SUGGESTED)

=> Flora to the café.

You are going to read a newspaper article about children and advertising. Choose the answer which you think fits best according to the text.

CHILDREN AND ADVERTISING

Children's reactions to advertisements can be very different from grown-ups. If adults see a product advertised and don't find it when they go shopping, they forget about it. As children develop the ability to recognise and understand ads and their purpose, they start making demands. If these demands are not fulfilled, they might start screaming or throwing themselves to the floor. It is difficult to explain to young children the reasons why they cannot have everything which - according to advertising - is 'for them'. 

Research by advertising agencies has confirmed that children's personal preferences can be targeted and changed by TV advertising. If adults, who have had years of practice in seeing through and being able to deal with ads, could not be influenced in their decisions to choose or buy products, then no company would spend millions on advertising. Research has also confirmed the influence of the media upon the close match between children's tastes and the content of the programmes they watch. Teachers say they know what has been on TV the night before by the games the children play the next day. The effectiveness of advertising increases when the ads are shown in between or around programmes aimed at children, or when children perceive an advertisement to be made 'for them' as, for example, with toys or breakfast cereals. 

Advertisements today are not so much about the products, but rather about the character of the consumers and how they should feel when they use or possess the advertised product. Messages to children are all about the happiness, social status or success which accompany the possession or consumption of a certain toy or type of food. 

Advertisement research found that the media can shape children's preferences for different toys, TV characters, lifestyles, etc. at different ages. Children's preferences are formed by the media and presented to them again in advertising. Children who are exposed to a lot of advertising are thus educated about a particular lifestyle: they are educated about living in a consumer society. They learn certain attitudes - the importance of money, what products are needed, how they are to be used and how products are supposed to make them feel. 

Allowing business interests and economic criteria to determine what children are exposed to when watching ads will undoubtedly have some effect on their future view of society. After all, the companies certainly do not have the children's moral or social well-being in mind; they are only concerned about profits. 

When adults don't find something they have seen in an advertisement, _____.
  • they can often be quite childish about it.
  • it becomes irrelevant to them.
  • they don't understand why it was advertised.
  • they continue looking until they find it.
According to the text, why do companies spend a lot on advertising?
  • It is successful at persuading people to buy their products.
  • It means they are able to influence the content of TV programmes.
  • It teaches people how advertising works.
  • They know that people prefer the ads to the programmes.
Ads aimed at children are more powerful when they are _____.
  • connected to schoolwork.
  • shown during children's programmes.
  • shown at breakfast time.
  • shown on a weekday.
The text implies that advertisements in the past _____.
  • presented a different lifestyle.
  • were more attractive to children.
  • focused more on the product.
  • showed toys children didn't want.
What do children learn from advertising?
  • How to live in a modern economy
  • How to have a successful career
  • Which TV characters are popular
  • What to do to work in advertising
Why is the writer worried about the power of companies?
  • They often sell products which are unsafe.
  • They often use children in their advertisements.
  • They don't understand how children react to ads.
  • They just want to make a lot of money out of children.

You are going to read an article by a food writer about a kind of Asian food called 'soup dumplings'.

Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A - G the one which fits each gap. There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A. Admittedly, it has nothing to say about taste or texture, which is what people are often interested in.

B. Consequently, there was no opportunity to learn about other people's recipes.

C. Here they made them a little bit smaller and slightly less sweet than in rival locations.

D. I loved how practical, but at the same time completely useless his idea was.

E. lt was the perfect opportunity to put these theories to the test.

F. Then I'd squeeze meat and do the same.

G. Visiting restaurants, I'd often seen a sign on the wall boasting about these particular qualities in the dumplings on offer.

In search of the perfect dumpling

My mum was an awful cook and perhaps because of that, I was always interested in food. I got my first job as a washer-up aged fifteen, then I spent ten years as a chef in different parts of the world. 

I came to Asia because I wanted to see Chinese and Japanese food first hand. In 2005 I ended up with a job at a French restaurant in Shanghai;  the city was really booming, and I was working up to seventy hours a week. So I started to write about Chinese restaurants instead. Soup dumplings were my starting point. 

Soup dumplings originated back in the 7th century in century Asia. The idea spread outwards from there, so today you can find something similar almost every where from Turkey eastwards. About 150 years ago, they arrived in the Shanghai area of China. In my experience, every region has its own variant on the standard ard soup dumpling. I thought I'd try and establish what the characteristics of the ideal Shanghai soup dumping are, then set out to measure those on offer in various c·l restaurants against that. 

When you talk to people from Shanghai, however, they'll always argue what makes a good soup dumpling. Some will say that the skin must be thin, others that there should be a lot tasty meat in the filling, or that there must be plenty of soup. So clearly, the perfect dumpling wasn't going to be that easy to find.

Meanwhile, a friend had told me about a guide to restaurants 'prepared for the convenience of mathematicians, experimental scientists, engineers and explorers'. lt was the pet project of an eccentric scientist who ate in hundreds of restaurants in New York and then created, by hand, a spreadsheet of them all, using symbols to show the ethnicity of the cuisine, what the place was like, etc. I thought I'd do the same for Shanghai soup dumplings. 

I bought a digital scale and a pair of callipers on an internet auction site. With these two tools and a pair of scissors, I went from restaurant to restaurant sampling the soup dumplings. I'd take each one out individually, weigh it and then snip a hole in the side and pour the soup out and weigh that. Using my callipers, I'd then measure the thickness of the skin on the bottom of the dumpling. 

I went to around fifty restaurants in all and wouldn't say the family-run places were any worse than the fancy ones with posh tablecloths and uniformed waiters. Hopefully, the guide I have produced will make you laugh and think. On the other hand, it is a list of fifty or so restaurants in Shanghai and it does attempt to put them in some sort of order for you. My next project is shallow-fried dumplings, which are cooked two-hundred at a time. They're a local speciality and incredibly popular.  

You are going to read a magazine article about four people who have become famous in their country.

Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

A. Jake Mackenzie hit the headlines as a teenager when he disappeared while sailing a small boat in the Pacific. He was eventually found safe and well, and instant fame followed. He became a regular guest on TV chat shows and his agent sold the film rights to his story for a considerable sum. "It'd always been my dream to be famous," said Jake, "though I never imagined it'd happen this way." Whatever the reason for it, he's certainly enjoying it: "I'm meeting some big stars, and I'm doing worthwhile things, too. Such as giving survival tips on TV, which one day might help someone in the situation I was in." The only disadvantage, he says, is when he's in hotels or taxis: "I have to leave extra-large tips in case they recognise me. If not, the next thing I know is that some tabloid will be calling me "mean", or worse." 

B. Soap actor Rachita Patel began her career in theatre. "Becoming quite well known happened gradually as the series grew in popularity, and I must admit I'd miss being in the public eye if it all suddenly came to an end. I've made good friends on this show, though one or two of those I work with clearly believe they're in a world where nobody can be trusted, that everyone's talking behind their back. Maybe it's understandable if they've been given a bad time by the press, with reporters pushing cameras and microphones in their face and shouting really nasty personal questions at them. But they're big stars, and I'm happy as I am. People sometimes recognise me and if they do they might smile, but other times nobody gives me a second glance, and that suits me fine, too."

C. Winning that gold medal," says ice-skater Elka Kaminski, "changed my life. Being invited onto TV shows and interviewed by the press was a dream come true, though back then I was totally inexperienced and I now regret one or two of the comments I made to them. I've met a lot of big stars and actually most of them are quite pleasant people, though there are one or two who show off and look down on everyone else. Funnily enough, they tend to be the ones who've achieved nothing in particular, they're just "famous for being famous". I'd like to think my success in skating might inspire other kids from poor backgrounds like mine, though I was initially uncomfortable with the idea of being a role model. But in the end I got used to the idea and I quite like it now."

D. Singer Marcos Carvalho still enjoys performing, though he's convinced he should have remained an unknown in a small town. "It's a pity I didn't realise sooner that I'm not the sort of person who's comfortable with publicity. I mean, the press will always find out every personal detail about you. I know they're only doing their job, but the reality is there's no privacy at all. Having said that, I wouldn't want to put anyone off the idea of making a name for themselves, because I'm sure for the vast majority it'd be tremendously exciting. It also usually means not having to worry about where your next pay cheque is coming from anymore."

Which person sometimes finds that being a celebrity can be expensive?
  • Jake Mackenzie
  • Rachita Patel
  • Elka Kaminski
  • Marcos Carvalho
Which person regrets becoming famous?
  • Jake Mackenzie
  • Rachita Patel
  • Elka Kaminski
  • Marcos Carvalho
Which person suggests the media can be too aggressive with celebrities?
  • Jake Mackenzie
  • Rachita Patel
  • Elka Kaminski
  • Marcos Carvalho
Which person at first found it hard to accept they should set an example for young people?
  • Jake Mackenzie
  • Rachita Patel
  • Elka Kaminski
  • Marcos Carvalho
Which person is pleased that their experience enables them to advise other people?
  • Jake Mackenzie
  • Rachita Patel
  • Elka Kaminski
  • Marcos Carvalho
Which person says that most people would enjoy being celebrities?
  • Jake Mackenzie
  • Rachita Patel
  • Elka Kaminski
  • Marcos Carvalho
Which person believes it is impossible for celebrities to keep anything secret from the media?
  • Jake Mackenzie
  • Rachita Patel
  • Elka Kaminski
  • Marcos Carvalho
Which person accuses some celebrities of thinking they are more important than other people?
  • Jake Mackenzie
  • Rachita Patel
  • Elka Kaminski
  • Marcos Carvalho
Which person says that some famous people are suspicious of other celebrities?
  • Jake Mackenzie
  • Rachita Patel
  • Elka Kaminski
  • Marcos Carvalho
Which person wishes they hadn't said some things in public?
  • Jake Mackenzie
  • Rachita Patel
  • Elka Kaminski
  • Marcos Carvalho