Đề thi vào 10 - Chuyên Anh THPT HCM năm 2019

8/30/2020 10:53:00 AM
_______ comes a time when you have to make a decision and stick to it.
  • It
  • That
  • Then
  • There

You _____ come out to the airport to meet me. I could have taken a bus.

  • needn’t have
  • needn’t
  • don’t need to
  • didn’t need to

By the end of the first half of the twenty-first century, women _____ against men in many sports.

  • compete
  • are competing
  • are competed
  • have competed
More and more trees in this area are found _______ from the effect of pollution.
  • died
  • to be dead
  • to be dying
  • having died
The food she has prepared for the party is not enough, for there are _____ more people showing up.
  • so
  • too
  • any
  • many

Minh Thu changed her major from literature to English, _____.

  • with the hope to be offered employment easier
  • hoping more easily she gets a job
  • with the hope for being able to find better job
  • hoping to find a job more easily
____________, the film began.
  • All of us have taken the seats
  • All of us having taken the seats
  • We all having seated
  • We all have been seated
They still haven’t made a decision ______ the new color scheme.
  • on reflection of
  • with a view to
  • with regard to
  • by contrast with

"The 20-year policy would be a good investment," said the insurance agent, "_________ you wanted to cash it within the first ten years."

  • even though
  • in case
  • lest
  • even if

I often wish I could afford to work less, _____ people, I suspect.

  • like do most
  • as do most
  • the same most
  • as much the same most

How much __________ do Jerry’s opinions carry with the committee?

  • importance
  • value
  • weight
  • worth

Many small businesses have ________ victim to the recent economic recession.

  • become
  • been
  • blamed
  • fallen

Road conditions are difficult because of the ________ rain.

  • driving
  • jumping
  • riding
  • running
Kathy __________ comes up with a solution when everyone else is at a loss.
  • absolutely
  • invariably
  • persistently
  • universally
She __________ till the early hours listening to music.
  • caught me up
  • picked me up
  • kept me up
  • took me up

Making mistakes is all _________ of growing up.

  • flesh and blood
  • odds and ends
  • part and parcel
  • top and bottom
They live miles away, _________.
  • split down the middle
  • from a distance
  • nearly nowhere
  • in the middle of nowhere

Many students _____ night after night to prepare for their coming exams.

  • burn the midnight oil
  • turn the tables on
  • rack their minds
  • fight tooth and nail

- Mary: "Could I go out with my friends tonight, Mommy?"

- Mother: "___." 

  • Yes, you will
  • Yes, let’s
  • Yes, you go
  • Yes, you can

- Mai: “How was the film you saw last night ?”

- Hoa: “___________.”

  • I’ve seen better
  • No, I didn’t
  • I think of it much
  • I like them all

Choose the correct word or phrase that best fits each space in the following passage.

In this week’s issue, our resident film critic discusses the etiquette of cinema going, and the audiences who prefer chewing hot-dogs, slurping drinks, gossiping and rustling crisp packets to actually watching the film. complaint, or just cinematic snobbery?

It’s the munchers and talkers, not those who complain about them, who are other people’s simple pleasures and the seem to me to be self-evident. Junk foods and even popcorns and choc ices, when eaten in a and possibly crowded space, are to demand living space. They spread themselves about - usually onto other people’s . Crisps, peanuts and boiled sweets make a lot of noise, first when being then when being crunched or sucked. These are definite , especially if you yourself - having merely come to see and hear the film - are not eating and not therefore generously your fried onions, mustard and ketchup with the trousers of the stranger in the seat.

Choose the word or phrase that best fits each space in the following passage.

There is a revolution in the retail world that cannot fail to attract shoppers’ noses. In the latest marketing ploy, smells are created in laboratories to be wafted around stores in order to the unsuspecting into spending more money. Secret of the “designer” smells are going on in more than a hundred stores across Britain, including bookshops, petrol stations and a chain of clothes shops. The tailor-made aromas include coconut oil in travel agents (to exotic holidays), and leather in car showrooms (to suggest lasting quality).

Marketing Aromatics, a company specialising in this area, believes that odours are under-used as a marketing . Until now the most frequent has been in supermarkets where the smell from in-store bakeries has been blown among the aisles to boost sales of fresh food. “We are taking things one stage further,” said David Fellowes, the company’s commercial director. “We can build on customer loyalty by making customers a particular smell with a particular store. It is not intrusive. If it were it would defeat the object.”

The smells are designed to work on three levels: to relax shoppers by using natural smells such as peppermint, to bring back memories using odours such as a whiff of sea breeze, and to encourage customer loyalty by using a corporate perfume “logo” to a company’s image. Dr. George Dodd, a scientific adviser to Marketing Aromatics, believes smells can affect people’s moods. “It is a very exciting time. Smells have enormous to influence behaviour,” he said. Critics say retailers are to subliminal advertising. “Not telling consumers that this is happening is an invasion of their privacy. People have the right to know,” said Conor Foley of Liberty, the civil liberties association.

Read the passage and choose the best answer to the questions.   

The spectacular aurora light displays that appear in the Earth’s atmosphere around the North and South magnetic poles were once mysterious phenomena. Now, scientists have data from satellites and ground-based observations from which we know that the aurora brilliance is an immense electrical discharge similar to that occurring in a neon sign.

To understand the cause of auroras, first picture the Earth enclosed by its magnetosphere, a huge region created by the Earth's magnetic field. Outside the magnetosphere, blasting toward the earth is the solar wind, a swiftly moving plasma of ionized gas with its own magnetic field.

Charged particles in this solar wind speed earthward along the solar wind’s magnetic lines of force with a spiralling motion. The Earth’s magnetosphere is a barrier to the solar wind, and forces the charged particles of the solar wind to flow around the magnetosphere itself. But in the polar regions, the magnetic lines of force of the Earth and of the solar wind bunch together. Here many of the solar wind’s charged particles break through the magnetosphere and enter Earth's magnetic field. They then spiral back and forth between the Earth's magnetic poles very rapidly. In the polar regions, electrons from the solar wind ionized and excite the atoms and molecules of the upper atmosphere, causing them to emit aurora radiations of visible light.

The colors of an aurora depend on the atoms emitting them. The dominant greenish-white light comes from low energy excitation of oxygen atoms. During huge magnetic storms oxygen atoms also undergo high energy excitation and emit crimson light. Excited nitrogen atoms contribute bands of color varying from blue to violet. Viewed from outer space, auroras can be seen as dimly glowing belts wrapped around each of the Earth's magnetic poles. Each aurora hangs like a curtain of light stretching over the polar regions and into the higher latitudes. When the solar flares that result in magnetic storms and aurora activity are very intense, aurora displays may extend as far as the southern regions of the United States.

Studies of auroras have given physicists new information about the behavior of plasmas, which has helped to explain the nature of outer space and is being applied in attempts to harness energy from the fusion of atoms.

What does the passage mainly discuss?

  • The methods used to observe auroras from outer space
  • The formation and appearance of auroras around the Earth’s poles
  • The factors that cause the variety of colors in auroras
  • The periodic variation in the display of auroras
The word “phenomena” in paragraph 1 is closest in meaning to ______.
  • ideas
  • stars
  • events
  • colors
The word “picture” in paragraph 2 is closest in meaning to ______.
  • frame
  • imagine
  • describe
  • explain

The passage describes “the magnetosphere as a barrier” because ______.

  • its position makes it difficult to be observed from Earth
  • it prevents particles from the solar wind from easily entering Earth’s atmosphere
  • it increases the speed of particles from the solar wind
  • it is strongest in the polar regions
The word “them” in paragraph 3 refers to _____.
  • polar regions
  • electrons
  • atoms and molecules
  • aurora radiations

According to the passage, which color appears most frequently in an aurora display?

  • greenish-white
  • crimson
  • blue
  • violet
The word “glowing” in line paragraph 4 is closest in meaning to ______.
  • shining
  • moving
  • charging
  • hanging
Auroras may be seen in the southern regions of the United States when ________.
  • magnetic storms do not affect the Earth
  • solar flares are very intense
  • the speed of the solar wind is reduced
  • the excitation of atoms is low

The passage supports which of the following statements about scientists’ understanding of auroras?

  • Before advances in technology, including satellites, scientists knew little about auroras.
  • New knowledge about the fusion of atoms allowed scientists to learn more about auroras.
  • Scientists cannot explain the cause of the different colors in auroras.
  • Until scientists learn more about plasma physics, little knowledge about auroras will be available.

Which of the following terms is defined in the passage?

  • magnetosphere
  • electrons
  • ionize
  • fusion

Rearrange the following sentences so that they make a meaningful text about a memory technique recommended for language learning.

A. The technique was formalized by Dr. Gruneborg.

B. The Linkword Technique uses images to link a word in one language with another word in another language.

C. It is claimed that by using this technique the basic vocabulary can be acquired in just 10 hours.

D. For example, if an English person wanted to learn the French word for carpet - tapis, he might imagine an oriental carpet where a tap is the central design. Tap has the same spelling as tapis so he will remember the French for carpet. 

E. Linkword books have been produced in many language pairs to help students acquired the basic vocabulary needed to get by in a language (usually about 1000 words).

ORDER:

-> -> -> ->

Supply each blank with one suitable word.

Journalists gather the news in a number of different . They may get stories from pressure which want to air their views in public. They seek publicity their opinions and may hold press or may issue a press release. A person who especially wishes to attract news will try to a sound bite in what they say. It is particularly hard for journalists to get material the silly season. Journalists also get stories by tapping useful sources by monitoring international news like Reuters. The more important a story is, the more inches it will be given in the newspaper.

Supply each blank with one suitable word.

One day it will seem strange retrospect, that we spent much more thoughts and effort on developing human ability than on making good of it, once we had it. There are innumerable examples. We them in casual conversation and occasionally they catch a journalist’s attention.

Doctors provide a good source of complaints: they to undergo a particularly protracted and detailed training and - at the end of it - many of them spend a substantial part of their day in relatively routine or clerical operations. Has anyone ever considered how much money could be saved by splitting these two aspects of a GP’s job? Nurses have recently reiterated their age-old complaint that their scarce and womanpower is frittered away in quite unskilled work. The educational world is of examples of highly paid specialists typing their own letters with two . We promote top research academics to headships of departments and give them inadequate support services. Even in business, the provision of secretarial help tends to go by seniority and not by the of routine work that has to be done.

Read the text below and look carefully at each sentence. Find errors in each sentence and correct them.

If there is no mistake, write "x" in both blanks.

(1) Plastic is a material that is both durable and versatile, in which it has thousands of uses, making it perfect for packaging. (2) Since it can be melted and molded in millions of different things, plastic has fundamentally changed the way people live. (3) More recently, however, the dangers of plastic waste have highlighted through television programs. (4) Every year, about 8 million tons of plastic ends up in the oceans. (5) By 2050, it is believed that there will be more plastic in the planet's waters than fish. (6) Marine life is at risk from the plastic packaging that pollutes the oceans because creatures often get tangled in it or eat it by mistakes, both of which can be fatal. (7) Plastic might be cheap and convenient, but it could end up cost us the Earth.

Sentence (1): 

Error: => Correct:

Sentence (2): 

Error: => Correct:

Sentence (3): 

Error: => Correct:

Sentence (4): 

Error: => Correct:

Sentence (5): 

Error: => Correct:

Sentence (6): 

Error: => Correct:

Sentence (7):

Error: => Correct:

Supply the appropriate forms of the words in brackets.

Traffic in Ho Chi Minh City has become for the past few years. (grid)

Supply the appropriate forms of the words in brackets.

I wish the local authorities would make the city center more . (bicycle)

Supply the appropriate forms of the words in brackets.

materials such as plastic and polymer are causing more and more damage to the environment. (grade)

Supply the appropriate forms of the words in brackets.

play centers are valuable for all children to spend their free time. (SCHOOL)

Supply the appropriate forms of the words in brackets.

The general opinion is that good qualifications are a to a well-paid job. (gate)

Supply the appropriate forms of the words in brackets.

Examinations coming, education is once again in the . (spot)

Supply the appropriate forms of the words in brackets.

There is a tendency in news reports to complex issues to make the news more entertaining. (simple)

Supply the appropriate forms of the words in brackets.

In focusing on vocational training, the official did not mean to the role of university education. (play)

Supply the appropriate forms of the words in brackets.

The opening ceremony ended with fireworks. (sense)

Supply the appropriate forms of the words in brackets.

Many parents place their children in danger by not making sure they wear seat belts. (wit)

Rewrite the following sentences without changing the meaning of the original sentence. You have to use between 3 and 8 words including the exact word given in brackets for the sentence.

What surprises me is that they are not worried about pollution in our city. (seem)

=> Surprising there is not any worries about pollution in our city.

Rewrite the following sentences without changing the meaning of the original sentence. You have to use between 3 and 8 words including the exact word given in brackets for the sentence.

What Anna hates most is posing for photographs. (than)

=> There's a pose for photographs.

Rewrite the following sentences without changing the meaning of the original sentence. You have to use between 3 and 8 words including the exact word given in brackets for the sentence.

We suspected the weather would get cold so we took warm clothes. (anticipation)

=> We took warm clothes cold.

Rewrite the following sentences without changing the meaning of the original sentence. You have to use between 3 and 8 words including the exact word given in brackets for the sentence.

Whenever I listen to that piece of music, I remember my school days. (back)

=> That piece of music to my school days.

Rewrite the following sentences without changing the meaning of the original sentence. You have to use between 3 and 8 words including the exact word given in brackets for the sentence.

To maintain good industrial relations, we must do all we can to avoid confrontation with management. (costs)

=> Confrontation with management to maintain good industrial relations.

Rewrite the following sentences without changing the meaning of the original sentence. You have to use between 3 and 8 words including the exact word given in brackets for the sentence.

Having little financial support, the student lived very cheaply. (shoestring)

=> The student little financial support.

Rewrite the following sentences without changing the meaning of the original sentence. You have to use between 3 and 8 words including the exact word given in brackets for the sentence.

You have no hope of succeeding if you are so careless with your work. (bound)

=> You careful with your work.

Rewrite the following sentences without changing the meaning of the original sentence. You have to use between 3 and 8 words including the exact word given in brackets for the sentence.

Anna had to endure a long and difficult interview before she got the job. (subjected) 

=> Anna was only a long and difficult interview.

Rewrite the following sentences without changing the meaning of the original sentence. You have to use between 3 and 8 words including the exact word given in brackets for the sentence.

In case of emergency, Peter is someone you can always rely on. (down)

=> Peter will an emergency.

Rewrite the following sentences without changing the meaning of the original sentence. You have to use between 3 and 8 words including the exact word given in brackets for the sentence.

George suggested a list of guests should be written. (drawn)

=> "Why not ?" said George.