Đề ôn luyện chuyên Anh vào 10 Sở Hà Nội số 11

11/1/2020 3:56:00 PM
Choose the word whose underlined part is pronounced differently from the others.
  • emulate

  • extinguish

  • expect

  • evacuate

Choose the word whose underlined part is pronounced differently from the others.
  • partially

  • party

  • particular

  • participate

Choose the word whose underlined part is pronounced differently from the others.
  • banquet

  • bouquet

  • racquet

  • croquet

Choose the word whose stressed pattern is pronounced differently from the others.
  • solicitude
  • manifest
  • compromise
  • influence
Choose the word whose stressed pattern is pronounced differently from the others.
  • flexible
  • formulaic
  • fraudulent
  • frivolous
The stranger ________ his gun at the policeman.
  • shot
  • exploded
  • fired
  • blew
We haven’t seen each other for a long time. We have lost ______________ with each other.
  • track
  • pace
  • touch
  • trace

Tidal waves are the result of an abrupt _____ in the underwater movement of the Earth.

  • damage
  • shift
  • extension
  • eruption
Had the electrician not come in time, we would _____ last night's party by candlelight.
  • have to have
  • have to be having
  • have had to have had
  • have had to have been having
Why do I always _____ the short straw?
  • draw
  • pull
  • drag
  • pluck

I think I need to bring my car to the auto salon because it is acting _____ again.

  • up
  • out
  • on
  • off
The sky suddenly went dark as a huge _____ of birds passed overhead.
  • herb
  • flock
  • pack
  • tribe
I hope the government reduces the amount of ______ tape required to start a new company.
  • green
  • blue
  • red
  • yellow
He doesn't like children chatting in class. _____ he will not put up with.
  • Such
  • Those
  • That
  • This thing
Many children who get into trouble in their early teens go on to become _____ offenders.
  • consistent
  • insistent
  • persistent
  • resistent

Pick out the verbs and particles given to form phrasal verbs to fill the gaps in these sentences. Some verbs and particles are used more than once. Remember to use the correct form of the verb.

[ come | turn | make | spring | cut | take ]

[ on | down | down with | in | into | out | up ]

There were clear blue skies at first, but then it a really horrible day.

She will never be by such a trick. You know she’s not a fool.

A few years ago no one here knew what a cyber cafe was; now they’re all over the city.

The doctor says he should on the amount of whisky he drinks, but he doesn’t have to alcohol altogether.

Being the sole heir, he a lot of money after his grandmother’s death.

Jack’s phoned to say he can’t come tonight; he’s a bad cold.

Is this story true or are you it ?

 

Think of ONE word only which can be used appropriately in all three sentences.

1. Katie was in good _____ last night at the dinner party, wasn't she?

2. The character reappears later in the play in the _____ of a ghost.

3. Could you just fill out this _____ for me, please?

=> Answer:

Think of ONE word only which can be used appropriately in all three sentences.

1. The hostage-takers have only made one _____ so far.

2. Bicycles are always more in _____ in the summer months.

3. We only order specialist books like that on _____.

=> Answer:

Think of ONE word only which can be used appropriately in all three sentences.

1. I feel a _____ deal better now I've eaten something!

2. It's no _____ complaining to me - I'm nothing to do with this.

3. There were a _____ many people we knew at the ceremony.

=> Answer:

Fill in the blank with an appropriate form of one of the words given to make a meaningful passage.

AN UNUSUAL SWIMMING CLUB

Members of a special club in Britain (0) (CHEER) cheerfully leave the warmth of their beds, while most sensible people are still fast (SLEEP) , for an (ENERGY) swim in water with a temperature of only seven degrees centigrade. This may sound like (STUPID) to you, but these swimmers firmly believe that it is (ATHLETE) to do this, even in mid-winter.

(MEMBER) of the club requires daily swimming outdoors. However, for people net used to large (DIFFERENT) in temperature, it may not be such a good idea. While there is an improvement in the blood (CIRCLE) of people who swim (habit) in icy water, it can be (DETRIMENT) to others. But when members are asked why they do it, the common (RESPOND) is that it makes them feel wonderful!

(Adapted from FCE)

Read the text and choose the best answer to fill in the blanks.

THE TRUTH BEHIND A SMILE

People smile a great deal, and we seem to know instinctively that some smiles are more genuine than others. But is there any scientific for this? Recent research suggests that a mechanism in the brain can help us recognize whether a smile is really heartfelt – or whether it is just being on for show.

According to various long-held traditions, a genuine smile involves the eyes as well as the mouth. In the nineteenth century, a French anatomist to prove this. He used electrodes to stimulate the facial muscles of volunteers, thereby creating false smiles. He found that real smiles were always with the contraction of a muscle around the eye, but that his artificially induced ones were not.

During more recent research, volunteers were shown a variety of human facial and their reactions to there were monitored. When they were shown a happy face, 35% of the volunteers immediately started looking at the eye area, checking for the tell-tale crinkles that would that the smile was genuine; but when shown a sad or neutral face, they did not. So why did the human brain evolve to distinguish between real and false smiles? It could be that this ability to a quick assessment of a smile has an important role to play on successful communication. A genuine smile as a gesture of conciliation in conflict, and it’s important to know whether they are really being offered a truce or not.

Fill each of the following blanks with ONE suitable word.

AN EQUAL SHARE OF HOUSEWORK MAKES A HAPPY RELATIONSHIP

A recent study shows that an unequal share of household chores is still the norm in many households, despite the fact that many more women now have jobs. In a survey of 1,256 people between 18 and 65, men said they contributed an average of 37 percent of the total housework, while the women estimated their share to be nearly double that, at 70 percent. This ratio was not by whether the woman was working or not.

When they were asked what they thought was a division of labor, women with jobs felt that housework should be shared equally between male and female partners. Women who did not work outside the home were satisfied to perform 80 percent - the of the household work - if their husbands did the remainder. Research has shown that, if levels increase these percentages, women become unhappy and anxious and feel they are unimportant.

After marriage, a woman is reported to increase her household workload by 14 hours per week, but for men the is just 90 minutes. So the division of labor becomes unbalanced, as the man's share increases much less than the woman's. It is the inequality and of respect, not the actual number of hours, which leads to anxiety and depression. The research housework is regarded as thankless and unfulfilling. Activities included in describe the study were cooking, cleaning, shopping, doing laundry, washing-up, and childcare. Women who have jobs report that they feel overworked by these chores in to their professional duties. In contrast, full-time homemakers frequently anticipate going back to work when the children grow up. Distress for this group is caused by losing the teamwork in the marriage.

Read the following passage then choose the best answer to each question below.

Printmaking is the generic term for a number of processes, of which woodcut and engraving are two prime examples. Prints are made by pressing a sheet of paper (or other material) against an image-bearing surface to which ink has been applied. When the paper is removed, the image adheres to it, but in reverse.

The woodcut had been used in China from the fifth century A.D. for applying patterns to textiles. The process was not introduced into Europe until the fourteenth century, first for textile decoration and then for printing on paper. Woodcuts are created by a relief process; first, the artist takes a block of wood, which has been sawed parallel to the grain, covers it with a white ground, and then draws the image in ink. The background is carved away, leaving the design area slightly raised. The woodblock is inked, and the ink adheres to the raised image. It is then transferred to damp paper either by hand or with a printing press.

Engraving, which grew out of the goldsmith's art, originated in Germany and northern Italy in the middle of the fifteenth century. It is an intaglio process (from Italian intagliare, "to carve"). The image is incised into a highly polished metal plate, usually copper, with a cutting instrument, or burin. The artist inks the plate and wipes it clean so that some ink remains in the incised grooves. An impression is made on damp paper in a printing press, with sufficient pressure being applied so that the paper picks up the ink.

Both woodcut and engraving have distinctive characteristics. Engraving lends itself to subtle modeling and shading through the use of fine lines. Hatching and cross-hatching determine the degree of light and shade in a print. Woodcuts tend to be more linear, with sharper contrasts between light and dark. Printmaking is well suited to the production of multiple images. A set of multiples is called an edition. Both methods can yield several hundred good-quality prints before the original block or plate begins to show signs of wear. Mass production of prints in the sixteenth century made images available, at a lower cost, to a much broader public than before.

What does the passage mainly discuss?
  • The origins of textile decoration
  • The characteristics of good-quality prints
  • Two types of printmaking
  • Types of paper used in printmaking
The author's purposes in paragraph 2 is to describe _____.
  • the woodcuts found in China in the fifth century
  • the use of woodcuts in the textile industry
  • the process involved in creating a woodcut
  • the introduction of woodcuts to Europe
The word "incised" in paragraph 3 is closest in meaning to _____.
  • burned
  • cut
  • framed
  • baked
The word "distinctive" in paragraph 4 is closest in meaning to _____.
  • unique
  • accurate
  • irregular
  • similar
According to the passage, all of the following are true about engraving EXCEPT that it _____.
  • developed from the art of the goldsmiths
  • requires that the paper be cut with a burin
  • originated in the fifteenth century
  • involves carving into a metal plate
The word "yield" in paragraph 4 is closest in meaning to _____.
  • imitate
  • produce
  • revise
  • contrast

According to the passage 4, what do woodcut and engraving have in common?

  • Their designs are slightly raised.
  • They achieve contrast through hatching and cross-hatching.
  • They were first used in Europe.
  • They allow multiple copies to be produced from one original.
According to the author, what made it possible for members of the general public to own prints in the sixteenth century?
  • Prints could be made at a low cost.
  • The quality of paper and ink had improved.
  • Many people became involved in the printmaking industry.
  • Decreased demand for prints kept prices affordable.
According to the passage, all of the following are true about prints EXCEPT that they _____.
  • can be reproduced on materials other than paper
  • are created from a reversed image
  • show variations between light and dark shades
  • require a printing press

Use the letter A, B, C, D to answer these questions with reference to the passages. There are some passages you can use more than once.

A New Life

A. The Farmer
Matt Froggatt used to be an insurance agent in the City of London but now runs a sheep farm.

"After 14 years in business, I found that the City had gone from a place which was exciting to work into a grind - no one was having fun any more. But I hadn't planned to leave for another five or ten years when I was made redundant. It came out of the blue. I didn't get a particularly good pay-off but it was enough to set up the farm with. My break came when I got to know the head chef of a local hotel with one of the top 20 hotel restaurants in the country. Through supplying them, my reputation spread and now I also supply meat through mail order. I'm glad I'm no longer stuck in the office but it's astonishing how little things have changed for me: the same 80- to 90-hour week and still selling a product."

B. The Painter
Ron Ablewhite was a manager in advertising but now makes a living as an artist.

"My painting began as a hobby but I realised I was getting far more excitement out of it than out of working. The decision to take redundancy and to become an artist seemed logical. The career counsellor I talked to was very helpful. I think I was the first person who had ever told him, "I don't want to go back to where I've been." He was astonished because the majority of people in their mid-forties need to get back to work immediately - they need the money. But we had married young and our children didn't need our support. It was a leap into the unknown. We went to the north of England, where we didn't know a soul. It meant leaving all our friends, but we've been lucky in that our friendships have survived the distance - plenty of them come up and visit us now."

C. The Hatmaker
After working for five years as a company lawyer, Katherine Goodison set up her own business in her London flat, making hats for private clients.

"My job as a lawyer was fun. It was stimulating and I earned a lot of money, but the hours were terrible. I realised I didn't want to become a senior partner in the company, working more and more hours, so I left. A lot of people said I'd get bored, but that has never happened. The secret is to have deadlines. Since it's a fashion-related business, you have the collections, next year's shapes, the season - there's always too much to do, so you have to run a very regimented diary. I feel happier now, and definitely less stressed. There are things I really long for, though, like the social interaction with colleagues. What I love about this job is that I'm totally responsible for the product. If I do a rubbish job, then I'm the one who takes the blame. Of course, you care when you're working for a company, but when your name is all over the promotional material, you care that little bit more."

D. The Masseur
Paul Drinkwater worked in finance for 16 years before becoming a masseur at the Life Centre in London.

"I had been in financial markets from the age of 22, setting up deals. I liked the adrenaline but I never found the work rewarding. I was nearly made redundant in 1989, but I escaped by resigning and travelling for a year. I spent that year trying to work out what I wanted to do. I was interested in health, so I visited some of the world's best gymnasiums and talked to the owners about how they started up. I knew that to change career I had to get qualifications so I did various courses in massage. Then I was offered part-time work at the Life Centre. I have no regrets. I never used to feel in control, but now I have peace of mind and control of my destiny. That's best of all."

(Adapted from FCE)

Which person mentions

1. enjoying their pastime more than the job they used to do? B

2. enjoying being in charge of their own life?

3. being surprised by suddenly losing their previous job?

4. not having other people depending on them financially?

5. missing working with other people?

6. undergoing training in order to take up their new job?

7. a contact being useful in promoting their new business?

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

He enjoys walking in the rain. (PLEASURE)

=> Walking .

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

I took the only course open to me and changed my job. (DID)

=> What I , which was the only course open to me.

She was unsuccessful in seeking for somewhere to shelter. (VAIN)

=> She .

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

Most people can understand him when he speaks Spanish. (UNDERSTOOD)

=> He can make .

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

If you do not pay you will be prosecuted. (RESULT)

=> Failure .

Complete the second sentence so that it has the same meaning to the first.

You're tired now because you stayed up late last night.

=> Had it .

Complete the second sentence so that it has the same meaning to the first.

I have not experienced such a storm since I was a child.

=> Not .

Complete the second sentence so that it has the same meaning to the first.

I will always stand by you whenever you are in trouble.

=> Should

Complete the second sentence so that it has the same meaning to the first.

He had a strong impulse to open the letter.

=> He couldn't resist .

Complete the second sentence so that it has the same meaning to the first.

It can be concluded from the research, heart diseases correlate with smoking.

=> The research shows a .