Đề số 21 ôn thi Anh Chuyên vào 10 CNN

3/15/2021 11:38:00 AM
Choose the word which has the underlined part pronounced differently from the others.
  • generative

  • hemispheric

  • penurious

  • nepotistic

Choose the word which has the underlined part pronounced differently from the others.
  • socialist

  • species
  • specimen
  • specialist
Choose the word which has the underlined part pronounced differently from the others.
  • immunity
  • inundated
  • munificent
  • humorously

Choose the word which has the underlined part pronounced differently from the others.

  • beliefs
  • chopsticks
  • museums
  • classmates

Choose the word whose stress pattern is different from the others.

  • regional
  • physical
  • ethereal
  • functional
Choose the word whose stress pattern is different from the others.
  • freedom
  • standard
  • blitzkrieg
  • parade
Choose the word whose stress pattern is different from the others.
  • voluntary
  • compulsory
  • necessary
  • stationary

Choose the word whose stress pattern is different from the others.

  • immense
  • gentle
  • penal
  • adverse

Choose the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s).

Pierre often helped her, and they devoted all their time to working in their laboratory.

  • dedicated
  • assigned
  • entrusted
  • bargained

Choose the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s).

Earthquakes are regarded as one of the most devastating forces known to man.

  • hideous
  • alarming
  • destructive
  • deplorable

Choose the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s).

On second thoughts, I think I will go with you to the theater.

  • Upon reflection
  • After discussing with you
  • For this time only
  • For the second time

Choose the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s).

The manager of this company is always courteous to customers.

  • moderate
  • disappointed
  • uncouth
  • optimistic

Choose the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s).

The caffeine in coffee invigorates a coffee drinker.

  • galvanizes
  • extrudes
  • fatigues
  • activates

Choose the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s).

Most universities have trained counselors who can reassure and console students who have academic or personal problems.

  • satisfy
  • sympathize
  • please
  • discourage
Capital punishment was done _____ in Britain nearly half a century ago.
  • out for
  • away with
  • off by
  • over from
Migrants to European countries often take _____ journeys over the sea.
  • perilous
  • secure
  • innocuous
  • painless
I asked him what to do but his instruction was so _____ that I still didn't understand.
  • explicable
  • garbled
  • decipherable
  • legible
You will undergo _____ at the end of your first month with us, which will involve both a written assessment and a progress interview.
  • an appraisal
  • an entitlement
  • a commission
  • an outlook
The new law will soon come into ______ after being passed by the constitution.
  • practice
  • force
  • influence
  • reality

Read the text and choose the best answer to fill in the blanks.

Sunday May 4th will be World Laughter Day. Dr. Madan Kataria, who introduced this annual event, says we need more laughter in our lives to the global rise of stress and loneliness. But surely that strange sound that we make periodically can't be the to such problems.

If an alien were to land on our planet and take a stroll among a crowd of earthlings, it would hear a lot of 'ha-ha' noises. It might wonder what this strange habit served. If we ask ourselves what a good laugh, the obvious answer is that it is a response to something funny. But one scientist, Robert Provine, says humor has surprisingly little to do with that. Instead, it lies at the of such issues as the perception of self and the evolution of language and social behavior.  

Provine realized that you cannot capture laughter in the lab because as soon as you it under scrutiny, it vanishes. So, instead, he gathered data by hanging around groups of people, noting when they laughed.

He collected 1,200 laugh episodes and episodes being defined as the comment immediately preceding the laughter and the laughter itself. His analysis of this data revealed some important facts about laughter. "If it's a message we send to other people — it disappears when we're by ourselves," he says. "And it's not a choice. Ask someone to laugh and they'll either try to fake a laugh or say they can't do it on command."

Read the passage then choose the best answer to each question.

In the early 19th century, football was very popular in the top private schools in England. Initially, each school had its own rules, and while the pupils were still at school the fact that they played by these particular rules hardly mattered. When, however, they left for the universities or for business in the provinces, it became clear that if they were to continue playing football they were going to need a universal set of rules, acceptable to all teams.

Up until the 1850s, two teams at, say, Oxford University, would only be playing a familiar game if every player had been to the same school. As things turned out, a major game was often preceded by a long correspondence with lengthy arguments about the rules. Was handling to be allowed? How many players on each side? How long should the pitch be? How wide the goals? Would carrying the ball be permitted? ('Yes', would say all the ex-pupils of Rugby school; 'No', would say almost everyone else.) And even when the game got underway, confusion and protests would necessitate long midfield conferences between the two captains.

In the time it became usual for the ex-Rugby students and their small but growing company of followers from other schools to play 'rugby' football on their own, and for the others to come to some agreement over the rules of the more popular version. Few of these early codes of rules have come down to us complete, but snatches from them give a clear idea of the patterns of the early game, and in particular how boring it must have been to stand in the cold and watch.

The first serious attempts at laying down the rules of football were made at Cambridge University in 1848 and these were adapted and tightened up twice in the 1850s. Then in November 1862, the Cambridge Rules have revised yet again and specified 11-a-side, an umpire from each side plus a neutral referee, goals 12 feet (3.7 m) across and up to 20 feet (6.15 m) high, and an hour and a quarter's play only. These rules were said to have worked well; in the following year, they formed a vital part of the rules of the newly formed-Football Association.

The formation of the Football Association was bitter and often ill-tempered. With neither side willing to give way, the split between rugby players and the rest became too wide ever to be mended. The real disagreement was not over running with the ball but over 'hacking'. Rugby players felt it was manly and courageous to tackle an opponent by kicking him on the leg; the others did not and voted against it. The rugby men called them cowards and walked out.

Rugby did, however, leave behind one significant innovation - the more precise name for its competitor. The story may not be true, but the legend is that one Charles Wreford-Brown, who later became a notable official of the Football Association, was asked by some friends at Oxford whether he would join them for a game of rugby or 'rugger', as it was now often called. He refused, claiming that he was going to play 'soccer' - evidently a play on the word 'association'. It caught on.

In the beginning of the 19th century, it became clear that ______.

  • university football was played by a special set of rules.
  • not all football teams were prepared to accept standard rules.
  • each school had different rules for football.
  • provincial footballers players by old-fashioned.

In the mid-19th century, the rules for important games were mainly settled by _____.

  • letters exchanged before the match
  • players from the same school
  • a special meeting between the two captains
  • all the players on the pitch
The word "snatches" in paragraph 3 probably means _____.
  • detailed copies
  • players' descriptions
  • short extracts
  • careful diagrams
We know from the text that football before 1848 was _____.
  • very similar to modern rugby
  • more strictly. regulated than rugby
  • always played with the same width goal
  • not very interesting for spectators
The Cambridge Rules of 1862 laid down _____.
  • the minimum time for a game
  • the number of players and referees
  • the exact size of the goal
  • the maximum length of the pitch
Rugby players could not agree with the Football Association over ______.
  • running with the ball
  • kicking other players
  • what to call the game
  • the shape of the goal
The word "It" in the last paragraph refers to _____.
  • the Football Association.
  • the use of 'rugger' for rugby.
  • the game at Oxford.
  • the new name for football.

What is the passage mainly about?

  • The formation of Football Association
  • The history of rules in football games
  • One successful football player
  • The football rules by Cambridge University

Alex is talking to his colleague, Tom, at the tea break.

Alex: "Do you fancy a drink this evening?"

Tom: "_____"

  • I’m afraid not. I can manage without you.
  • Thank you. I’m glad you could go.
  • Some other time, perhaps. I’m busy tonight.
  • Why not? Pleased to meet you, too.

Lora is talking to Maria about her failure at applying for a job.

Lora: “_____”

Maria: “Never mind, better luck next time.”

  • I have a lot on my mind.
  • I’ve broken your precious vase.
  • I couldn’t keep my mind on work.
  • I didn’t get the vacant position.

Daniel: “Do you think it’s bad to keep all the candy to yourself?”

Jacob: “_____”

  • You are absolutely right. I’m crazy about candy.
  • I’m so sorry. Sometimes I’m too aggressive.
  • I’m sorry. I should not be so selfish.
  • You’re right. I’m a bit jealous.

Two friends are talking about the university entrance examination.

Peter: “My parents gave me no choice but to study business.”

Danny: “_____.”

  • Well, so be it.
  • Of course not.
  • Oh, by all means.
  • No, I can’t get it.

Two high school students, Jane and John, are talking about their plans after graduation.

Jane: "_____."

John: "As far as I’m concerned, there’s no doubt about it."

  • Taking a gap year should be among the best choices for us, don’t you think?
  • Let's take a gap year and see how things go!
  • What do you think about taking a gap year before university?
  • How come you decided to take a gap year before university!

Choose the best way to rearrange the following sentences in order to make a meaningful conversation.

a. Could you possibly tell me how to change a flat tire?

b. I think so. Let me see if I've got that right. First, I use the jack to rise up the car.

c. Of course. Use the jack to raise up the car. Unscrew the bolts and take off the flat tire. Then put on the new tire, put the bolts on tight, and lower the car. Do you follow me?

d. Then I unscrew the bolts and take off the flat tire. And then... Hmm. I forgot the last part. Could you repeat that?

e. Um-hum.

f. You put on the new tire, put the bolts on tight, and lower the car.  

  • c-f-b-a-d-e
  • e-b-f-d-a-c
  • a-c-b-e-d-f
  • d-a-e-c-b

Choose the best way to rearrange the following sentences in order to make a meaningful conversation.

a. I pulled the fire alarm, rushed into the house, and quickly took the two children being stucked in their bedroom out of the house.

b. I ran toward the smoke and saw a house on fire.

c. So what did you do?

d. Well, I was walking along the sidewalk when suddenly I saw a lot of smoke rising into the air.

e. What did you do next?

f. What happened?

  • f-d-c-b-e-a
  • a-d-c-e-b
  • e-d-a-c-b
  • d-a-e-c-b

Choose the best way to rearrange the following sentences in order to make a meaningful conversation.

a. Good idea! I should also take a sports jacket. Which one do you think looks best on me?

b. How about the dark brown one I have for your birthday?

c. I'd take the blue one with black stripes.

d. Okay. I'll also need to take along a few ties.

e. Which suit do you think I should take?  

  • f-e-a-d-b-c
  • e-c-a-b-d
  • a-b-c-e-f-d
  • a-d-f-e-c-b

Choose the best way to rearrange the following sentences in order to make a meaningful conversation.

a. He did?

b. I have some bad news.

c. I'm afraid so.

d. My husband just lost his job.

e. Oh? What is it?

f. That's too bad. You must be very upset.

  • b-e-d-a-c-f
  • b-d-e-a-c-f
  • e-d-a-c-b
  • d-a-e-c-b

Choose the best way to rearrange the following sentences in order to make a meaningful conversation.

a. Have you by any chance ever been to Tokyo?

b. I'm going there with my family for a vacation next month. Can you tell me what it's like there?

c. Really? That's good to hear.

d. Well, it's a very exciting place. As a matter of fact, it's probably one of the most exciting places I know.

e. Yes, I have. Why?

  • f-e-a-d-b-c
  • a-b-e-c-d
  • a-e-d-b-c
  • a-e-b-d-c

Choose the sentence CLOSEST in meaning to the sentence given.

If Dick had John's position in the company, everybody believes he would be able to motivate the workers better.

  • Everybody who works in this company thinks that John motivates the workers well, so that is why he has a better job here than Dick.
  • It is believed that John is not as good at encouraging the company’s workers as Dick would be if he had the same job.
  • If Dick were able to motivate the workers better, he would be given John’s present job in the company.
  • Everybody in the company thinks that the workers were motivated far better when Dick was doing John’s present job.

Choose the sentence CLOSEST in meaning to the sentence given.

The opinions of the teaching staff were divided as to whether they should change the course book or follow the old one.

  • Some members of the teaching staff were in favour of following a new course book, while others thought they should continue with the old one.
  • There were different opinions among the teaching staff about the new course book, and in the end, those who were against choosing a new one won.
  • The teaching staff could not agree upon a new course book, so they decided to continue with the old one.
  • There was no general agreement among the teaching staff about which they should choose as their new course book.

Choose the sentence CLOSEST in meaning to the sentence given.

Communicating with locals in a foreign country is a bit like becoming a mime since you must often rely on hand gestures.

  • In foreign countries, you will often see local mimes who communicate solely by using their hands so that everyone can understand what they are trying to say.
  • Locals in a foreign country who don’t know another language often communicate with tourists by miming.
  • You often feel like a mime when trying to speak to someone in a foreign country because of frequently having to use your hands to convey what you want to say.
  • When miming, it is important to remember to use your hands, especially when you are speaking to locals in a foreign country.

Choose the sentence CLOSEST in meaning to the sentence given.

It is her sense of humour and the supportive friends surrounding her that make it possible for her to endure these difficult times.

  • She believes that if you have a sense of humour and friendly people surrounding and supporting you, you can always make it through hard times.
  • Difficult times are hard to endure when you don’t have a sense of humour or friends around you who can support you, as far as she is concerned.
  • With a sense of humour and supportive friends around her, she could have endured these difficult times a lot better.
  • Without the support of the friends around her and her sense of humour, she wouldn’t be able to make it through these hard times.

Choose the sentence CLOSEST in meaning to the sentence given.

When she arrived in New York fresh from college and a trip abroad, she was broke but excited.

  • Her trip abroad cost a lot of money and now she is broke, but she is thrilled to be finally in New York after graduating from college.
  • When she moved to New York, she didn’t have any money left because she had spent it all on tuition and a holiday abroad.
  • After she graduated from college in New York, she was excited about taking a trip overseas, but she was running out of money.
  • She didn’t have any money, but was full of enthusiasm at the time she came to New York, having just completed college and a holiday overseas.

Choose the sentence that best combines this pair of sentences.

Coral reefs create underwater habitats that are essential for many species of marine organisms. There are also some fish who use them as a refuge from predators.

  • Many fish tend to stay in coral reefs because there they are both safe from predators and supplied with a rich food source.
  • Coral reefs are very important for many kinds of marine life forms because they provide a place to live as well as a place for some fish to hide from them enemies.
  • Coral reefs provide a place to live for many types of sea creatures, including predators who use them as a place to rest.
  • Coral reefs are becoming scarce and this creates an important problem for the many marine animals which use them as a place to live as well as a place of protection.

Choose the sentence that best combines this pair of sentences.

That film can't have been the one that Susan was telling us about. The story of it was far too simple and it wasn't in French.

  • Susan was talking about a film that sounded far too simplistic and wasn’t even French; she must have meant this one.
  • Susan told us about a movie in French with a complex storyline; the one we went to see must have been a different one.
  • The film we watched may not have been the one Susan said; it was in French, but the story didn’t seem very complex.
  • That movie couldn’t have been French; the story was very easy to understand, like the one Susan was telling us about.

Choose the sentence that best combines this pair of sentences.

There are few truly natural places left in the world. Most of them are practically inaccessible.

  • There’s no way to get to most of the world’s nature spots, and so, they remain almost intact.
  • It’s true that the number of official nature areas is declining, but you can visit them with some effort.
  • It’s hardly possible to gain access to most of the few remaining genuinely natural places on this planet.
  • It isn’t very practical to try to go to natural places any more as there are simply too few left.

Choose the sentence that best combines this pair of sentences.

Peter didn’t realize Frances, who cycling behind, had lost track of him. Therefore, he continued travelling without stopping at the corner.

  • As he was under the impression that Frances was following him on her bike, Peter did not stop to wait at the corner.
  • Peter waited until Prances appeared around the corner cycling, and then continued travelling.
  • Peter wouldn’t have stopped at the comer if he’d realized that Frances was following him at a close distance behind.
  • Peter forgot what he’d arranged with Frances, and cycled past the corner without checking whether she was following or not.

Choose the sentence that best combines this pair of sentences.

James Bond is the best-known hero of spy fiction in the late 20th century. It is created by British novelist Ian Fleming.

  • Ian Fleming was a famous British spy late in the 20th century who created and wrote about a fictional character by the name of James Bond.
  • Ian Fleming is considered a British hero for his creation of James Bond, a fictional spy whom he wrote of in the late 20th century.
  • Ian Fleming wrote extensively about the British spy James Bond in the late 1900s, but most of what he wrote was fiction.
  • James Bond, the most well-known fictional spy character of the late 1900s, is the creation of the British author Ian Fleming.

Read the passage and choose the correct answer.

(1) ____________. This, however, couldn’t be further from the truth. According to a recent study carried out by the Media Insight Project, 85% of youngsters say that keeping up to date with the news is important to them, and 69% receive news on a daily basis. Perhaps what some of the older generation fail to understand is that just (2) __________. Born into a digital age, or more specifically the age of the internet, the younger generation simply accesses news through the digital devices they grew up using: (3) ____________ A recent study produced by Ofcom revealed that 60% of youngsters in the UK use the internet or apps for news, compared to just 21% of those in the older age range. (4) ___________. Most youngsters actually don’t seek out news from social media but choose to follow it once they see it there. (5) ___________, they encounter it accidentally and therefore following the news is secondary.

Choose the correct answer for (1)

  • In recent years, there has been a growing concern by researchers and indeed the older generation that the younger generation are somewhat disengaged from the news
  • In recent years, researchers and the older generation are worried about the younger generation reading news from digital devices instead of buying newspaper
  • In recent years, researchers and the older generation believe that the younger generation are indifferent to foreign and domestic affairs
  • In recent years, researchers and the older generation are convinced that technologies have badly affected the younger generation’s reading habits

Choose the correct answer for (2)

  • the younger generation, however, has other interests rather than being engaged in the daily bad news which may upset them
  • as they prefer watching news to reading newspaper, the daily consumption of newspaper is that low
  • because the younger generation does not buy a daily newspaper, obviously, it doesn’t mean that they don’t follow the news
  • the younger generation do not follow long reads, instead they prefer to keep up with short, quick and up-to-minute news

Choose the correct answer for (3)

  • laptops, smartphones, tablets, etc.
  • fridges, washing machines, ovens, etc.
  • TVs, radios, CD players, etc.
  • cars, motorbikes, planes, etc.

Choose the correct answer for (4)

  • The younger generation prefer using social media to read news to electronic news channels
  • Social media also plays an important part in consuming the news for the younger generation
  • Facebook is the best tool for the younger generation to update news from different sources
  • The older generation, instead, hardly find digital news a credible source of information

Choose the correct answer for (5)

  • Besides
  • As a result
  • Meanwhile
  • In other words