Đề thi thử Anh chuyên vào 10 Sở Hà Nội 2021 - Lần 2

5/7/2021 2:59:00 PM

Choose the word which has the underlined part pronounced differently from the others.

  • intrude

  • imprudent

  • hallucinate

  • input

Choose the word which has the underlined part pronounced differently from the others.

  • rout

  • mould

  • moult

  • dough

Choose the word which has the underlined part pronounced differently from the others.

  • absent

  • absolutely

  • advertise

  • atmosphere

Choose the word that differs from the rest in the position of the main stress.

  • swallow
  • compete
  • oblige
  • august

Choose the word that differs from the rest in the position of the main stress.

  • mosquito
  • herbicide
  • decision
  • deposit

His landlady gave him a week’s _____ to leave the flat.

  • threat
  • notice
  • advice
  • caution

I am _____ tired to think about that problem at the moment.

  • far too
  • simply
  • much more
  • nearly

It’s advisable to _____ any contact with potential rabies animals.

  • escape
  • avoid
  • prevent
  • evade

_____ reaches the cells of the body, it is oxidized, or slowly burned.

  • Digested food that
  • Food is digested
  • Why does digested food
  • As digested food

His new house must have cost _____.

  • an eye
  • the earth
  • the bank
  • a leg

The earlier model is _____ for its unreliability and now we are almost unlikely to find it on the market.

  • disreputable
  • irreverent
  • notorious
  • pre-eminent

_____ with being so busy at work and at home, she became increasingly tired and bad-tempered.

  • How
  • What
  • Which
  • Where
Doctors are often _____ to accidents in rural areas.
  • called up
  • driven out
  • called out
  • rung up
Our class monitor had a brilliant speech yesterday although he spoke _____ the cuff then.
  • about
  • with
  • off
  • on
_____ the meeting began.
  • After we have sat down
  • All of us having taken the seats
  • Our having seated
  • Once we had seated

Fill each of the following blanks with ONE suitable word.

Most people I know never go to a martial arts movie, even if you paid them, but I defy anyone not to enjoy seventy minutes in the dark with Jackie Chan. For a start, Chan is simply interested in evading the bullies who want to do him over - and if he bumps into someone as he's running away, he's invariably apologetic. His screen persona is never to bombast. Chan is a likable, bumbling. Every man who tries to extricate himself from scrapes with his astounding athletic : as he leaps up the side of a building, you swear he was on wires. With the kind of agility limited to monkeys and flies, Chan seems of scuttering up any surface. But it is extremely for him to go on the offensive. The films of lesser action stars like Jean-Claude Van Damme provide a diet of relentless violence, punctuated now and by some semi-moronic 'witticism' but Chan's balletic altercations with his enemies are as a oriented around the art of comic evasion.

Think of ONE word only which can be used appropriately in all three sentences.

1. The club's _____ of wins was abruptly broken by an unknown football team from the south.

2. His knowledge of Japanese was so limited that he could hardly _____ a sentence together.

3. Jane looked gorgeous in her low-cut dress with a _____ of pearls around her neck.

Answer:

Think of ONE word only which can be used appropriately in all three sentences.

1. The press believed his answers to the questions were not _____ true.

2. _____ speaking, she is a teaching assistant, not a qualified teacher.

3. You must act _____ in accordance with the wishes of your colleagues in this matter, regardless of what you yourself want.

Answer:

Think of ONE word only which can be used appropriately in all three sentences.

1. The policeman was subjected to a _____ of abuse when he asked what the young men were doing on the roof of the building.

2. Sensibly, Mick decided to postpone his purchase of a CD player until the recently advertised models came on _____.

3. When Jenny returned to school after the holidays, she was surprised to find that she had been placed in a higher _____ for maths.

Answer:

Read the following passage then choose the best answer to each question below.

The Creators of Grammar

No student of a foreign language needs to be told that grammar is complex. By changing word sequences and by adding a range of auxiliary verbs and suffixes, we are able to communicate tiny variations in meaning. We can turn a statement into a question, state whether an action has taken place or is soon to take place, and perform many other word tricks to convey subtle differences in meaning. Nor is this complexity inherent to the English language. All languages, even those of so-called 'primitive' tribes have clever grammatical components. The Cherokee pronoun system, for example, can distinguish between 'you and I', 'several other people and I' and 'you, another person and I'.  In English, all these meanings are summed up in the one, crude pronoun 'we'.  Grammar is universal and plays a part in every language, no matter how widespread it is.  So the question which has baffled many linguists is - who created grammar?

At first, it would appear that this question is impossible to answer. To find out how grammar is created, someone needs to be present at the time of a language's creation, documenting its emergence. Many historical linguists are able to trace modern complex languages back to earlier languages, but in order to answer the question of how complex languages are actually formed, the researcher needs to observe how languages are started from scratch. Amazingly, however, this is possible.

Some of the most recent languages evolved due to the Atlantic slave trade. At that time, slaves from a number of different ethnicities were forced to work together under colonizer's rule. Since they had no opportunity to learn each other's languages, they developed a make-shift language called a pidgin. Pidgins are strings of words copied from the language of the landowner. They have little in the way of grammar, and in many cases it is difficult for a listener to deduce when an event happened, and who did what to whom. Speakers need to use circumlocution in order to make their meaning understood. Interestingly, however, all it takes for a pidgin to become a complex language is for a group of children to be exposed to it at the time when they learn their mother tongue. Slave children did not simply copy the strings of words uttered by their elders, they adapted their words to create a new, expressive language. It included standardised word orders and grammatical markers that existed in neither the pidgin language, nor the language of the colonizers. Complex grammar systems which emerge from pidgins are termed creoles, and they are invented by children.

Further evidence of this can be seen in studying sign languages for the deaf.  Sign languages are not simply a series of gestures; they utilise the same grammatical machinery that is found in spoken languages.  Moreover, there are many different languages used worldwide. The creation of one such language was documented quite recently in Nicaragua. Previously, all deaf people were isolated from each other, but in 1979 a new government introduced schools for the deaf.  Although children were taught speech and lip reading in the classroom, in the playgrounds they began to invent their own sign system, using the gestures that they used at home. It was basically a pidgin. Each child used the signs differently, and there was no consistent grammar.  However, children who joined the school later, when this inventive sign system was already around, developed a quite different sign language.  Although it was based on the signs of the older children, the younger children's language was more fluid and compact, and it utilised a large range of grammatical devices to clarify meaning.  What is more, all the children used the signs in the same way.  A new creole was born.

Some linguists believe that many of the world's most established languages were creoles at first. The English past tense –ed ending may have evolved from the verb 'do'. 'It ended' may once have been 'It end-did'. Therefore it would appear that even the most widespread languages were partly created by children. Children appear to have innate grammatical machinery in their brains, which springs to life when they are first trying to make sense of the world around them. Their minds can serve to create logical, complex structures, even when there is no grammar present for them to copy.

In paragraph 1, why does the writer include information about the Cherokee language?

  • To show how simple, traditional cultures can have complicated grammar structures
  • To show how English grammar differs from Cherokee grammar
  • To prove that complex grammar structures were invented by the Cherokees
  • To demonstrate how difficult it is to learn the Cherokee language

What does the writer want to point out in the sentence: "Grammar is universal and plays a part in every language, no matter how widespread it is"?

  • All languages, whether they are spoken by a few people or a lot of people, contain grammar.
  • Some languages include a lot of grammar, whereas other languages contain a little.
  • Languages which contain a lot of grammar are more common that languages that contain a little.
  • The grammar of all languages is the same, no matter where the languages evolved.

'From scratch' in paragraph 2 is closest in meaning to:

  • from the very beginning
  • in simple cultures
  • by copying something else
  • by using written information

What can be inferred about the slaves' pidgin language?

  • It contained complex grammar.
  • It was based on many different languages.
  • It was difficult to understand, even among slaves.
  • It was created by the land-owners.

'Make-shift' in paragraph 3 is closest in meaning to:

  • complicated and expressive
  • simple and temporary
  • extensive and diverse
  • private and personal

Which idea is presented in the final paragraph?

  • English was probably once a creole.
  • The English past tense system is inaccurate.
  • Linguists have proven that English was created by children.
  • Children say English past tenses differently from adults.

All the following sentences about Nicaraguan sign language are true EXCEPT:

  • The language has been created since 1979.
  • The language is based on speech and lip reading.
  • The language incorporates signs which children used at home.
  • The language was perfected by younger children.

Look at the word 'consistent' in paragraph 4. This word could best be replaced by which of the following?

  • natural
  • predictable
  • imaginable
  • uniform

Complete the sentence by changing the form of the word in capitals.

When Bill and Melinda Gates announced on Monday that they would be ending their 27-year marriage, they tweeted in tandem that they “no longer believe [they] can grow together as a couple.” The reasoning wasn’t unusual for a 21st-century divorce, but their private emotional journey has highly (TYPE) financial implications: Between their personal holdings and the charitable foundation they started together, the amount of money they control - somewhere around $180 billion - is roughly equal to the annual GDP of Kazakhstan or Qatar.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which they launched 25 years after Bill co-founded Microsoft, is one of the biggest private charitable foundations in the world, with an endowment of about $50 billion. In a sense, the jobs of its 1,600 employees and its investments in malaria prevention and (CHILD) education have rested on the bedrock of Bill and Melinda’s marriage.

Another wealthy divorcée in the Seattle area, MacKenzie Scott - (FORM) married to Amazon’s Jeff Bezos - has already established a (MARRY) blueprint that Melinda Gates might follow. In their divorce, in 2019, Scott came away with a quarter of the Amazon shares that the couple jointly owned, which worked out to roughly $38 billion at the time and has since appreciated to about $58 billion; in a philanthropic spree late last year, she gave away $4 billion.
In one sense, the Gates divorce is similar in that each involves tech billionaires splitting up after more than 25 years of marriage. But unlike Scott at the time of her divorce, Melinda Gates already has widespread name recognition, and through her and Bill’s work for the foundation, their partnership has become a brand of its own. Their shared fame lends their divorce the feeling of a cultural institution dissolving, kind of like the recent (BREAK) of Kim Kardashian and Kanye West, just with less reality TV and more gentle-colored sweaters.

Read the text and choose the best answer to fill in the blanks.

A life of their own

The best way to deal with computers is to treat them like people

'Pastry,' once wrote a cookery expert: 'like horses and children, seems to sense if you are afraid of it and plays up .' Had she been writing today, she might well have mentioned that computers are just the same. Like small children, they do not well to force, and just as one way of with a fractious child is to send it to its room to off, so quite often, if the machine is giving trouble, the first thing to try is simply switching it off and doing something else, quite why machine works when you boot it up again I have no idea.

human emotions and feelings to inanimate objects is, of course, extremely unscientific; it's only those who don't understand machines who believe that they behave like people. But I would that, although treating machines like people may be misguided, it is , in general, to treating people like machines. 

You are going to read a magazine article about students who have travelled the world before going to university. Choose the section that contains the information in each question. The sections may be chosen more than once.

Taking off

Five young people remember their 'gap year' experiences when they travelled the world between finishing school and going to university.

A. Tom Baker
After my exams, I read through all the gap year literature, but I'd had enough of having to turn up to lessons every day at school. So I flew to New Zealand, without any structured plans, just to see what happened. I had to live very cheaply, so I didn't use public transport, preferring to hitch-hike the long distances between the towns. I was amazed how generous people were. I was always being picked up by strangers and invited into their homes after nothing more than a conversation at the roadside. My hosts invited me to climb volcanoes, go trekking with them, even play a part in a short film. In a way, I learned just as much about life as I did when I was at university back in the UK. 

B. Robin Talbot
It all began when I was on summer holiday staying at a friend's house in New York. By the autumn, I was convinced I didn't want to leave and I stayed there for a year. I worked three days a week in a bar and two nights in a restaurant, which gave me plenty to live on. The Brazilian band that worked in the bar offered me a room in their apartment, and we played salsa music and had barbecues all summer. I realised eventually that I couldn't be a waiter forever, so I came back to university.

C. Mark Irvin
I couldn't face another three years studying straight after school so, like many of my classmates, I decided to do a round-the-world trip. I wanted to set off at the end of the summer, but it took six months of working before I had enough money. I'd planned my route so that I'd be travelling with friends for part of the way and alone the rest of the time. In Japan, I met some incredibly generous people who invited me into their homes. I found their culture fascinating. But in Australia it was less interesting because it was more difficult to meet the locals, as I could only afford to stay in hostels and these were full of British travellers like me.

D. Simon Barton
Going to Latin America was quite a courageous decision for me, and the first time I had travelled without a fixed route or any companions. I was worried that my last-minute Spanish course would not be enough. I was originally planning to fly to Mexico, then go overland by bus to Belize, but a hurricane intervened and it was too risky. So I went west by bus to Guatemala. The people were very friendly, but as I'm blond-haired and blue-eyed they stared a bit, which didn't bother me. I just smiled. I dutifully kept all my important stuff on me, as suggested in the World Travellers' Guidebook, but I didn't run into any trouble at all. And despite what I thought might happen, I ate anything and everything and didn't have any problems. It was great! I'm already saving for my next trip.

(Adapted from Cambridge FCE)

Which student needed not have worried about health problems?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student had to delay the start of his trip?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student was concerned about an aspect of his preparations for the trip?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student gained unexpected benefits from a limited budget?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student found different ways of earning money while he was away from home?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student was unaccustomed to travelling alone?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student wanted to avoid having a fixed programme?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Which student found accommodation through some colleagues?

  • Tom Baker
  • Robin Talbot
  • Mark Irvin
  • Simon Barton

Pick out the verbs and particles given to form phrasal verbs to fill the gaps in these sentences. Remember to use all the verbs given and don’t forget to use the correct forms of the verbs.

[ adhere | wire | gobble | go | take | sail | riddle ] [ up | down | for | to | off | through | with]

 

1. If you the rules in prison, you might be set free soon.

2. Spending hours everything is a distant memory. All you have to do is switch on and connect.

3. Don't your food - take your time, enjoy it.

4. The house $900,000, which was more than we had expected.

5. He was put in charge of security, but he was the job after a week as he was not strict enough.

6. Helena had failed the driving test more than 10 times, but she finally it.

7. His argument is inconclusive points.

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

Employees were not allowed to bring food into the meeting room.

=> The company ..........

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

The organizers planned everything as carefully as they could possibly have done. 

=> Everything was planned with ..........

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

He told us that getting a later plane was our only option. 

=> 'You have no ..........'

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

The phone bill was so expensive that Dave was furious.

=> Dave was up ..........

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

The man over there lost his temper in the public meeting. 

=> That's the man who flew ..........

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

Inefficient treatment of customers creates a bad impression of the company. (REFLECTS)

=> Treating customers with a lack the company.

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

'I've decided I really want to go on a cruise around the Med this summer,' said Molly. (HEART)

=> Molly says on a cruise around the Med this summer. 

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

We honestly all found it almost impossible not to laugh when we saw Joslfs new haircut. (FACE)

=> Honestly, almost impossible when we saw Josh's new haircut. 

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

Being inexperienced was a disadvantage to her when she applied for promotion. (COUNTED)

=> Her when she applied for promotion.

Complete the second sentence using the word given so that it has the same meaning to the first.

You have to use logic and lateral thinking in equal measure in this job. (STRIKE)

=> You have to logic and lateral thinking in this job.