Đề số 25 ôn thi Chuyên Anh vào 10 CNN

6/1/2021 8:27:05 AM

Choose the word which has the underlined part pronounced differently from the others.

  • nootropic

  • moodiness
  • oodles

  • kookiness

Choose the word which has the underlined part pronounced differently from the others.

  • eternal

  • enchanted

  • erratic

  • emerald

Choose the word which has the underlined part pronounced differently from the others.

  • fortunate

  • questionnaire

  • combustion

  • initiative

Choose the word which has the underlined part pronounced differently from the others.

  • adobe 

  • finale 

  • forte

  • facsimile

Choose the word that differs from the rest in the position of the main stress.

  • bootleg
  • heinous
  • destined
  • divine

Choose the word that differs from the rest in the position of the main stress.

  • atrocious
  • optimal
  • monastic
  • deniable

Choose the word that differs from the rest in the position of the main stress.

  • spectroscopy
  • telomere
  • aquaculture
  • tranquillizer

Choose the word that differs from the rest in the position of the main stress.

  • macaron
  • espresso
  • tortilla
  • granola

Choose the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s).

That comment could be construed in either of two ways.

  • mistaken
  • interpreted
  • utilized
  • advanced

Choose the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s).

Her refusal to answer was tantamount to an admission of guilt.

  • common
  • counted
  • unlikely
  • equivalent

Choose the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s).

Eventually, her efforts bore fruit and she got the job she wanted.

  • got successful results
  • was full of herself
  • was good to go
  • gain time

Choose the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s).

I've made the rounds of all the agents, but nobody has any tickets left.

  • ask around
  • take turns
  • disconnect
  • refuse

Choose the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s).

The insomniac musician from Washington released an album under the moniker Sleepless in Seattle.

  • nickname
  • pen name
  • big name
  • real name

Choose the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s).

The company saw a few bright spots early in the year, but overall demand for their products remained lackluster.

  • dull
  • abundant
  • scattered
  • median

Becky runs the office and Sue is her apprentice, _____.

  • as it were
  • as it was
  • as if it were
  • suppose she were

After a lengthy debate, the spokesman announced the board had _____ a unanimous conclusion.

  • committed
  • solved
  • reached
  • compromised

Mr. Smith ate his breakfast in great _____ so as not to miss the bus to Liverpool.

  • speed
  • pace
  • rush
  • haste

The handwriting is completely _____. This note must have been written a long time ago.

  • inedible
  • indelible
  • illegible
  • unfeasible

It's no wonder the children felt disappointed because first their parents promised to take them to Disneyland and then they _____ on their word.

  • played down
  • drew out
  • came off
  • went back

Read the text and choose the best answer to fill in the blanks.

Few inventions have had more scorn and praise them at the same time than television. And few have done so much to unite the world into one vast audience for news, sport, information and entertainment. Television must be alongside printing as one of the most significant inventions of all time in the of communications. In just a few decades it has reached every home in the developed world and an ever-increasing proportion of homes in developing countries. It took over half a century from the first suggestion that television might be possible before the first pictures were produced in laboratories in Britain and America.
In 1926 John Logie Baird's genius for publicity brought television to the of a British audience. It has since such heights of success and taken on such a pivotal function that it is difficult to imagine a world of this groundbreaking invention. 

- "What can I do for you, madam?"

- "_____."

  • No problem
  • No, thanks. I'm just browsing
  • No. None your business
  • I can handle it myself

- "_____"

- "For sure."

  • This soup is delicious.
  • I bought some snacks.
  • Could I have another helping of mashed potatoes?
  • I'm stuffed.

- "Is there anything good on?"

- "_____."

  • There are too many commercials
  • Yeah, there is a rerun
  • It's the season finale
  • I've already seen this episode

- "This purse is nice, isn't it?"

- "But _____."

  • I have one
  • check the price
  • that's a good deal
  • it's a rip-off

- "It's freezing."

- "_____."

  • Make sure to bundle up
  • We're expecting some winter weather
  • I got caught in a downpour
  • I think it's letting up

Choose the best way to rearrange the following sentences in order to make a meaningful conversation.

1. I wish I had a talent like that.
2. I see that you're pretty talented.
3. Thank you very much.
4. Oh, so you took an art class?
5. I'm sure you have a talent. It's just hidden.
6. Yeah, I loved that class.

  • 4-6-2-3-1-5
  • 4-2-5-6-3-1
  • 1-3-4-6-5-2
  • 2-3-4-6-1-5

Choose the best way to rearrange the following sentences in order to make a meaningful conversation.

1. So I'll see you next time.
2. We should hang out some time.
3. Is there anything you would like to do next time?
4. I'd like that.
5. I think that would be nice.
6. Do you want to go out to eat?

  • 2-4-1-5-3-6
  • 6-4-5-3-2-1
  • 2-5-3-6-4-1
  • 1-5-6-4-2-3

Choose the best way to rearrange the following sentences in order to make a meaningful conversation.

1. I have to do some things, and besides, it's not polite to be nosey.
2. I've enjoyed conversing with you.
3. I wasn't done talking to you.
4. I've got to go.
5. I'm not like that. I'm just asking.
6. Is there a reason why you're trying to get off the phone so fast?

  • 2-6-5-3-1-4
  • 2-6-4-3-1-5
  • 4-3-5-2-1-6
  • 4-3-6-2-5-1

Choose the best way to rearrange the following sentences in order to make a meaningful conversation.

1. That's the reason it was such a great game.
2. Our team won 101-98.
3. Sounds like it was a close game.
4. The next game, I will definitely be there.
5. It was a great game.
6. What was the score at the end of the game?

  • 4-5-1-6-3-2
  • 3-2-5-1-2-6
  • 2-5-3-1-4-6
  • 5-6-2-3-1-4

Choose the best way to rearrange the following sentences in order to make a meaningful conversation.

1. I'm throwing a party on Friday.

2. Hey, what's good with you?

3. I'm sorry. I'm already doing something this Friday.

4. Not a lot. What about you?

5. That sounds like fun.

6. Do you think you can come?

  • 2-4-1-5-6-3
  • 1-3-2-4-6-5
  • 6-3-2-4-1-5
  • 3-4-5-1-6-2

You are going to read an article about a man who makes works of art out of seashells. Choose the answer which you think fits best according to the text.

THE SHELL ARTIST 

At the age of 83 Peter Cooke has become a master of his art.

There are still many things that Peter Cooke would like to try his hand at - paper-making and feather-work are on his list. For the moment though, he will stick to the skill that he has delighted to perfect over the past ten years: making delicate and unusual objects out of shells.

"Tell me if I am boring you" he says, as he leads me round his apartment showing me his work. There is a fine line between being a bore and being an enthusiast but Cooke need not worry; he fits into the latter category, helped both by his and by the beauty of the things he makes.

He points to a pair of shell-covered ornaments above a fireplace. 'I shan't be at all bothered if people don't buy them because I have got so used to them, and to me, they're adorable. I never meant to sell my work commercially. Some friends came to see me about five years ago and said, "You must have an exhibition -people ought to see these. We'll talk to a man who owns an art gallery".' The result was an exhibition in London, at which 70 per cent of the objects were sold. His second exhibition opened at the gallery yesterday. Considering the enormous prices the pieces command - around $2,000 for the ornaments - an empty space above the fireplace would seem a small sacrifice for Cooke to make.

There are 86 pieces in the exhibition, with prices starting at $225 for a shell-flower in a crystal vase. Cooke insists that he has nothing to do with the prices and is cheerily open about their level: he claims there is nobody else in the world who produces work like his, and, as the gallery-owner told him, 'Well, you're going to stop one day and everybody will want your pieces because there won't be anymore.'

'I do wish, though,' says Cooke, 'that I'd taken this up a lot earlier, because then I would have been able to produce really wonderful things - at least the potential would have been there. Although the ideas are still there and I'm doing the best I can now, I'm more limited physically than I was when I started.' Still, the work that he has managed to produce is a long way from the common shell constructions that can be found in seaside shops. 'I have a miniature mind,' he says, and this has resulted in boxes covered in thousands of tiny shells, little shaded pictures made from shells and baskets of astonishingly realistic flowers.

Cooke has created his own method and uses materials as and when he finds them. He uses the cardboard sent back with laundered shirts for his flower bases, a nameless glue bought in bulk from a sail-maker ('If it runs out, I don't know what I will do!') and washing-up liquid to wash the shells. 'I have an idea of what I want to do, and it just does itself,' he says of his working method, yet the attention to detail, color gradations and symmetry he achieves look far from accidental.

Cooke's quest for beautiful, and especially tiny, shells has taken him further than his Norfolk shore: to France, Thailand, Mexico, South Africa and the Philippines, to name but a few of the beaches where he has lain on his stomach and looked for beauties to bring home. He is insistent that he only collects dead shells and defends himself against people who write him letters accusing him of stripping the world's beaches. 'When I am collecting shells, I hear people's great fat feet crunching them up far faster than I can collect them; and the ones that are left, the sea breaks up. I would not dream of collecting shells with living creatures in them or diving for them, but once their occupants have left, why should I not collect them?' If one bases this argument on the amount of luggage that can be carried home by one man, the sum beauty of whose work is often greater than its natural parts, it becomes very convincing indeed.

What does the reader learn about Peter Cooke in the first paragraph?

  • He has produced hand-made objects in different materials.
  • He was praised for his she objects many years ago.
  • He hopes to work with other materials in the future.
  • He has written about his love of making shell objects.

When looking round his apartment, the writer _____

  • is attracted by Cooke's personality.
  • senses that Cooke wants his products to be admired.
  • realises he finds Cooke's work boring.
  • feels uncertain about giving Cooke his opinion.

The 'small sacrifice' refers to _____

  • the loss of Cooke's ornaments.
  • the display of Cooke's ornaments.
  • the cost of keeping Cooke's ornaments.
  • the space required to store Cooke's ornaments.

When the writer enquires about the cost of his shell objects, Cooke _____.

  • cleverly changes the subject.
  • defends the prices charged for his work.
  • says he has no idea why the bevel is so high.
  • notes that his work will not always be so popular.

What does Cooke regret about his work?

  • He is not as famous as he should have been.
  • He makes less money than he should make.
  • He is less imaginative than he used to be.
  • He is not as skilful as he used to be.

When talking about the artist's working method, the writer suspects that Cooke _____

  • accepts that he sometimes makes mistakes.
  • is unaware of the unique quality his work has.
  • underrates his creative contribution.
  • undervalues the materials that he uses.

What does the reader learn about Cooke's shell-collecting activities?

  • Other methods might make his work easier.
  • Not everyone approves of what he does.
  • Other tourists get in the way of his collecting.
  • Not all shells are the right size and shape for his work.

What does 'it' in the last paragraph refer to?

  • Cooke's luggage
  • Cooke's argument
  • the beauty of Cooke's work
  • the reason for Cooke's trips

Choose the sentence that is closest in meaning to the following question.

As there was a great deal of rain in the spring we are expecting a good fruit harvest this year.

  • It rained so heavily all through the springtime that fruit harvest will certainly be affected.
  • This year we can expect a better fruit harvest ever, though we didn’t have a wet spring.
  • Though it rained often this spring, the fruit trees are yielding plenty of fruit.
  • There should be an abundance of fruit this year as it rained so much in the spring.

Choose the sentence that is closest in meaning to the following question.

I've been out of the country for nearly a year, so I'm out of touch with everything.

  • A year or so abroad will make you feel different about your own country.
  • On my return after almost a year, I was touched to find so few changes here.
  • I feel quite like a stranger now that I’m back after almost a year abroad.
  • The year abroad has estranged me, so I don’t want to go back to my own country.

Choose the sentence that is closest in meaning to the following question.

Both dogs and cats have been domestic animals for millennia, yet in general, cats have retained their independent nature much more than dogs.

  • Cats, unlike dogs, have never become fully domestic, and so they have managed to preserve their independent spirit for millennia.
  • Cats have generally remained more self-reliant than dogs, though both kinds of animals have been domesticated for thousands of years.
  • Although neither animal has really been wild for millennia, cats have never been totally dependent on people like dogs.
  • Dogs and cats are both domestic animals that have kept their independent nature ever since they were domesticated thousands of years ago.

Choose the sentence that is closest in meaning to the following question.

As I understand it, the advantages of the scheme and the disadvantages just about balance each other out.

  • I really cannot decide whether the advantages of the scheme outweigh the disadvantages, or whether it is the other way round.
  • If you want my opinion, I would say the scheme has fewer advantages than disadvantages.
  • In a scheme of this sort one would expect there to be both advantages and disadvantages.
  • It is essential that the advantages and the disadvantages of the scheme are given equal attention.

Choose the sentence that is closest in meaning to the following question.

The West's main response to events in Yugoslavia has been to avoid any direct involvement.

  • The West could have responded to the situation in Yugoslavia with a policy of active involvement.
  • By and large the West has been reluctant to commit itself actively to affairs in Yugoslavia.
  • The involvement of the West in Yugoslavia was in response to certain major events.
  • Direct intervention was the response of the West to happenings in Yugoslavia.

Choose the sentence that best combines this pair of sentences.

He fulfilled his dream of traveling the world. He decided to get a job and settle down.

  • If he had fulfilled his dream of traveling the world, he would have decided to get a job and settle down.
  • Having fulfilled his dream of traveling the world, he decided to get a job and settle down.
  • Although he had fulfilled his dream of traveling the world, he decided not to get a job and settle down.
  • As he decided to get a job and settle down, he didn't fulfill his dream of traveling the world.

Choose the sentence that best combines this pair of sentences.

Wealthy venture investors are willing to pour money into African startups. It is their poor understanding of this market that restrain the development of the young's innovative ideas.

  • The ignorance about the African market by the deepest-pocketed investors has stunted many indigenous youths on the continent with promising ideas.
  • There are a lot of issues as a black founder raising money abroad from outside ventures, which reforms their ideal business plans.
  • Abroad investors have a lot of money, but they hardly have any experience in African markets, especially emerging start-ups.
  • African business has been not attractive to outside partners due to its uncreative strategies of young start-ups.

Choose the sentence that best combines this pair of sentences.

She prepared so thoroughly for a talk show about the solution to the crisis. Unfortunately, it has not been widely spread by the public.

  • She suggested some solutions for the crisis but no one cares about it.
  • Her speech about the need for a pacific solution to the crisis fell on stony ground.
  • The solution to political situation is spoken, thus it is popular in public.
  • Her suggestive solution for the crisis has been ignored.

Choose the sentence that best combines this pair of sentences.

There is no need to worry about the sales drop. Just wait and hope the situation will be improved.

  • Waiting for the higher sales is everything that should be done at this time.
  • Some actions like exaggerating about current case cannot solve the problem.
  • Don't panic about the low sales - let it ride for a while and see if business picks up.
  • Try to stay calm because the situation will quickly rise up.

Choose the sentence that best combines this pair of sentences.

There are many criticisms around his personal life. All he does is keep silent and brushes them off.

  • Criticisms seem not to affect much to his normal life.
  • He ignored to be gossiped about his privacy and stayed in quiet.
  • The matter of his life is revealed to all, and he does nothing but let it be.
  • He refuses to listen to what critics sarcastically say about his private life.

Read the passage and choose the correct answer.

(1) _____, one usually associated with tailpipe exhaust and factory and power plant smokestacks. Now new research shows that 16,000 U.S. deaths are the result of air polluted by growing and raising food—and 80 percent of those result from producing animal products like meat, dairy, and eggs.

Additional deaths are attributable to products we don’t eat, including ethanol, leather, or wool. (2) _____.

(3) _____. But the new study is the first to identify which individual foods and diets have the biggest effect on the air pollution that causes asthma, heart attacks, and strokes.

“The long-term effects of climate change are daunting and quite frightening, but this is killing people now, too,” says Jason Hill, a University of Minnesota biosystems engineer and senior author. “These are emissions that happen every year, that affect people, that lead to a poor quality of life.”

(4) _____. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, an industry trade group that reviewed the findings, dismissed the study as “based on faulty assumptions and riddled with data gaps.” The association characterized the study as a “misleading” contributor to “a false narrative around animal agriculture.” The American Farm Bureau Federation made similar claims saying it stretched “the definition of cause and effect.”

(5) _____, Hill explained that their data came from peer-reviewed and public government data from the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “All the models have been extensively peer-reviewed and have been widely used by our group and by many others,” says Hill.

Choose the correct answer for (1)

  • Air pollution remains a major cause of death in the United States
  • There are many reasons for the pollution in the United States
  • Some parts in the United States are at risk of air pollution
  • Industrial manufacturing has caused worse effects on some parts of the world

Choose the correct answer for (2)

  • Agriculture is a major source of air pollution, killing an estimated 17,900 people in the U.S. every year, according to a new study
  • That brings the total number of deaths from agricultural air pollution to 17,900 a year
  • We spend a lot of time thinking about how the food we consume impacts our health, but the food we eat impacts other people’s as well
  • Growing corn for food, fuel, and livestock feed, for instance, corresponds to 3,700 deaths every year as a result of toxic air

Choose the correct answer for (3)

  • In contrast, vegetables, the category encompassing the corn that humans eat, contributes to 100 deaths
  • The study’s authors looked at what it takes to produce them - such as fertilizing crops, tilling land, burning diesel engine tractors, and managing the waste produced by livestock
  • The environmental impact of certain foods - such as their carbon footprint and land or water use—has been researched for more than a decade
  • It’s striking to see how they’re concentrated in a few food groups

Choose the correct answer for (4)

  • So much of our agriculture is driven by animal agriculture.
  • Individuals can affect change, as well.
  • This brings it to the forefront.
  • Industry groups criticized the study.

Choose the correct answer for (5)

  • In response to this criticism
  • To support the arguement
  • Last but not least
  • Inasmuch as